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Split Toe Shoe - Norwegian vs. Algonquin

landshark

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One is made by Alden, and one by Peal & Co. They are likely made on different lasts, meaning they will fit differently. I like the Peal & Co. over the Alden. Much sleeker.
 

tim_horton

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Yes, I know they are different companies. Just wondering if there was something that made an "angonquin" split toe an "algonquin" instead of a "Norwegian" - aside from what company makes the shoe. Doesn't the "Norwegian" refer to the way the welt is constructed, like a Goodyear welt?
 

tim_horton

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Originally Posted by vncrz
Only tangentially related, but what is this type of toe/tip called without the seam at the tip? I'm talking about a loafer type toe on a blucher, like the C&J Onslow:


I'm guessing just plain "Norwegian" without "split toe"? After all that's what Weejuns refer to


The Onslow is Goodyear welted, so isn't considered a Norwegian-type shoe, if I'm not mistaken.
 

DorianGrey

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I always thought they were the same - one name originating from the US and one from Europe.
 

comrade

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Originally Posted by DorianGrey
I always thought they were the same - one name originating from the US and one from Europe.

Actually it's a bit more complicated. The difference in terms dates from the first
encounters between the Vikings under Erik the Red and the Native Americans
(Skrealings) about a thousand years ago.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skræling
 

upnorth

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I believe the ones without the split toes are called "apron front" but I could be wrong.
 

Edify Inc

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Originally Posted by upnorth
I believe the ones without the split toes are called "apron front" but I could be wrong.

I do believe you are right.

Apron front is a type of upper construction, as is the split toe.

Norwegian, Goodyear, Blake, etc, are types of welt and/or outsole constructions.

I may be wrong, please correct if I am.
 

Edify Inc

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Originally Posted by DorianGrey
I always thought they were the same - one name originating from the US and one from Europe.

If I am not mistaken, they are two different techniques.

The Goodyear welt involves the upper being lasted under the feather (or the edge of the insole), before being stitched through to the welt.

The Norwegian welt is lasted out at the feather, and actually rests between the welt and the outsole. On this kind of construction you can usually see 2 rows of stitching instead of 1 on the GYW.
 

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