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Southwest Style, Decor, Food, Travel, Arts & Culture Thread

Gus

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This thread is for all things Southwest. Feel free to contribute anything about style, decor, design, arts and culture as well as scenic beauty and travel adventures or questions.

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Gus

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Shiprock Santa Fe is an excellent source of vintage Navajo rugs. They are one of the best in the country for several reasons. Jed, the owner, is a third generation trader that grew up on a trading post in Northwestern New Mexico and speaks Navajo. He went to NYC to study fashion in his 20's so he also has a keen eye for style and design. The staff at his gallery are all wonderful and very helpful. When it comes to finding a special vintage rug, I don't know of anyone who has a larger assortment to choose from. They also have many long-time relationships with major collectors around the world so amazing rugs(as well as jewelry, baskets, pottery) come in on consignment all of the time. They get some of the higher prices for rugs, but you get what you pay for - cleaned, repaired (if needed), only better and unique examples. They do offer rugs at more entry level prices and condition however you won't see them on their website. The website only has a fraction of their ever changing inventory.
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Gus

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“We went to Santa Fe, to Taos, to Durango,” Mr. Lauren said of those first explorations. “After I came back, I started coming to work in cowboy clothes every day; it gave me a sense of freedom.”

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Gus

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From Vogue July 17, 2017

Visvim, Santa Fe, NM

New Mexico is having a moment. Its capital, Santa Fe, has long been known for its desert spas and rich Native American culture, but the city has lately become a destination for urban dwellers craving a little peace, solitude, and otherworldly scenery. Visvim’s Hiroki Nakamura and his wife, Kelsi, visit Santa Fe once a year—their friend Jed Foutz owns the gallery and store Shiprock Santa Fe—and when a Victorian house down the street became available, they felt it was the perfect setting for their first women’s-only Visvim store (also known as WMV Visvim). An unlikely location? Yes. But, as Nakamura says matter-of-factly: “We always like to do things differently.”


Fans of the label might say that’s an understatement. While the duo’s peers may have leaned into the streetwear craze or over-the-top runway shows, Hiroki and Kelsi are as focused as ever on fabric development and artisanal techniques like hand-painted washi skirts, rare natural dyes, and other time-intensive crafts. “Our products have a connection to the culture in Santa Fe,” Nakamura says. “People here have an appreciation for crafts and things made by hand. Bigger cities like New York and Tokyo are more commercial [in terms of fashion], but here, it’s really culture- and art-oriented.” There’s a big demand for vintage clothes and casual, desert-friendly pieces—think lots of denim and breezy cotton.

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tweedlover

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“We went to Santa Fe, to Taos, to Durango,” Mr. Lauren said of those first explorations. “After I came back, I started coming to work in cowboy clothes every day; it gave me a sense of freedom.”

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Been to Santa Fe, Taos, and Durango. A bit disappointed in Taos. But my absolute favorite area in the US. Gives me a hankering to return as haven't been there in some 25 years. In your rug photo noticed some rugs with fringe. I have a small southwestern rug I bought nearly 50 years ago-don't remember where-and recently tried to see if it was Navajo by online research which told me Navajo rugs don't feature fringe, which mine has. That so Gus?
 

lefty

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Best Christmas Eve I've ever spent was the procession of the Virgin Mary from the San Geronimo Church at the Taos Pueblo.

Here's a pic:

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lefty
 

Gus

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Best Christmas Eve I've ever spent was the procession of the Virgin Mary from the San Geronimo Church at the Taos Pueblo.

Here's a pic:

View attachment 1824942

lefty

Everyone I've met who has been lucky enough to attend the Christmas event says it is their most remarkable Holiday experience. (Still on my bucket list) It's the only place I know of in the entire US where people have lived continuously for over 1,000 years. Taos Pueblo is the only living Native American community designated both a World Heritage Site by UNESCO and a National Historic Landmark.

And good news: the Taos Pueblo just reopened after its long COVID closure. You can get more details about it and tours on their website https://taospueblo.com Note that it isn't open every day so be sure to check their calendar. If you want a very special or private tour of the Pueblo I recommend contacting https://www.heritageinspirations.com/tours/taos/ a company owned by a Taos resident with personal contacts at the Pueblo.
 

Gus

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In your rug photo noticed some rugs with fringe. I have a small southwestern rug I bought nearly 50 years ago-don't remember where-and recently tried to see if it was Navajo by online research which told me Navajo rugs don't feature fringe, which mine has. That so Gus?
Navajo rugs are woven on an upright loom and don't have fringe. Early Southwest rugs with fringe are "Rio Grande" rugs. Rio Grande blankets are more rare than Navajo blankets. These blankets are becoming more popular as collectors recognize that these objects have their own niche in the world of fine weaving. The Spanish Colonialists made these blankets going back to the arrival of the Spaniards to North America in the late 1500s. These blankets were used as wearing blankets and as bedding. The weaving of these blankets started in the early 1600s as the Spanish moved north well before this area became the United States. The Spanish brought with them the sheep and the horizontal treadle loom and settled in local areas between the Pueblos and Navajo enclaves. So Navajo rugs, no fringe and woven upright while Rio Grande rugs are woven on a horizontal loom and have fringe. Below is a Rio Grande blanket from the mid 1800's of Hispanic origin. Note that there is some fringe.

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The Rio Grande blankets evolved in the early 20th century to what are now called Chimayo blankets which are still made today. You can visit the town of Chimaya (between Santa Fe and Taos on the High Road) and see the weaving being done using this method. Below is a Chimayo blanket woven in the style of the 1930's and later.

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lefty

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Everyone I've met who has been lucky enough to attend the Christmas event says it is their most remarkable Holiday experience. (Still on my bucket list) It's the only place I know of in the entire US where people have lived continuously for over 1,000 years. Taos Pueblo is the only living Native American community designated both a World Heritage Site by UNESCO and a National Historic Landmark.

Do it this year, Gus. It's a hell of an experience. Huge bonfires, Virgin Mary, rifles being shot in the air, 1000 people, and cell phones strictly not allowed.

lefty
 

tweedlover

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Navajo rugs are woven on an upright loom and don't have fringe. Early Southwest rugs with fringe are "Rio Grande" rugs. Rio Grande blankets are more rare than Navajo blankets. These blankets are becoming more popular as collectors recognize that these objects have their own niche in the world of fine weaving. The Spanish Colonialists made these blankets going back to the arrival of the Spaniards to North America in the late 1500s. These blankets were used as wearing blankets and as bedding. The weaving of these blankets started in the early 1600s as the Spanish moved north well before this area became the United States. The Spanish brought with them the sheep and the horizontal treadle loom and settled in local areas between the Pueblos and Navajo enclaves. So Navajo rugs, no fringe and woven upright while Rio Grande rugs are woven on a horizontal loom and have fringe. Below is a Rio Grande blanket from the mid 1800's of Hispanic origin. Note that there is some fringe.

View attachment 1824969

The Rio Grande blankets evolved in the early 20th century to what are now called Chimayo blankets which are still made today. You can visit the town of Chimaya (between Santa Fe and Taos on the High Road) and see the weaving being done using this method. Below is a Chimayo blanket woven in the style of the 1930's and later.

View attachment 1824966
Thanks Gus. The last rug in your post does bear a similarity to mine in style. By the way long ago we had visited the Santorio des Chimaya but don't recall where it was located. Would it be in or around Chimaya?
 

tweedlover

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Do it this year, Gus. It's a hell of an experience. Huge bonfires, Virgin Mary, rifles being shot in the air, 1000 people, and cell phones strictly not allowed.

lefty
Rifles shot in the air are never a good idea. What goes up must come down and there have been cases of folks getting shot that way.
 

Gus

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By the way long ago we had visited the Santorio des Chimaya but don't recall where it was located. Would it be in or around Chimaya?

Yes it is in Chimaya. As you may know the Santorio des Chimaya is a church built around 1810 and is considered a holy shrine in the Catholic faith and known as "Lourdes of America" for its reported healings. Many visitors to the church take a small amount of the "holy dirt", often in hopes of a miraculous cure for themselves or someone who could not make the trip. Pilgrams walk from as far away as Albuquerque (90 miles) during Holy Week and the Highway Department has temporary flashing roadside signs, "Watch For Walkers".


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double00

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Navajo rugs are woven on an upright loom and don't have fringe. Early Southwest rugs with fringe are "Rio Grande" rugs. Rio Grande blankets are more rare than Navajo blankets. These blankets are becoming more popular as collectors recognize that these objects have their own niche in the world of fine weaving. The Spanish Colonialists made these blankets going back to the arrival of the Spaniards to North America in the late 1500s. These blankets were used as wearing blankets and as bedding. The weaving of these blankets started in the early 1600s as the Spanish moved north well before this area became the United States. The Spanish brought with them the sheep and the horizontal treadle loom and settled in local areas between the Pueblos and Navajo enclaves. So Navajo rugs, no fringe and woven upright while Rio Grande rugs are woven on a horizontal loom and have fringe. Below is a Rio Grande blanket from the mid 1800's of Hispanic origin. Note that there is some fringe.

View attachment 1824969

The Rio Grande blankets evolved in the early 20th century to what are now called Chimayo blankets which are still made today. You can visit the town of Chimaya (between Santa Fe and Taos on the High Road) and see the weaving being done using this method. Below is a Chimayo blanket woven in the style of the 1930's and later.

View attachment 1824966

the chimayo vests and coats are legit amazing and worth a mention . ortega's is the label i know .
 
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tweedlover

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Yes it is in Chimaya. As you may know the Santorio des Chimaya is a church built around 1810 and is considered a holy shrine in the Catholic faith and known as "Lourdes of America" for its reported healings. Many visitors to the church take a small amount of the "holy dirt", often in hopes of a miraculous cure for themselves or someone who could not make the trip. Pilgrams walk from as far away as Albuquerque (90 miles) during Holy Week and the Highway Department has temporary flashing roadside signs, "Watch For Walkers".


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1 of the rooms in the small church was filled with crutches and prayers of supplication were attached to its walls. Though, I think all that was moved out of that room some time ago. Was cool to see the painted wall murals in the church from 200+ years ago.
 

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