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Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by sipang, Dec 8, 2011.

  1. hoodyear

    hoodyear Senior member

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    Torrent's your best (free) option. Otherwise it's on Amazon instant.


    The use of color in Kagemusha is equally compelling I think:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Kurosawa's transition to color is fascinating to follow.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2013
    2 people like this.
  2. zapatiste

    zapatiste Senior member

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    persevering in trans-dimensional subconsciousness
    

    This is not an endorsement of piracy, but you may find better luck searching
    Code:
    Ran (1985, Akira Kurosawa) x264 AAC multisubs

    yeah i was considering this. assuming we can even know its position, this would tell us nothing about the direction it's moving. there was a group in Israel that recently put out a paper describing a technique to measure (weak measurement, the termed it) the wave function of a system without collapsing it. The abstract was insane and I didn't go through the experimental setup carefully enough to say anything more, but it gave me hope !

    i think in one sense the photon does have a physical presence. if you pass light through a medium, say glass, the reason it appears to slow down is due to the lightwave causing the electrons in the medium to vibrate which in turn create a phase shift in the lightwave, and the wave has to recompose before exiting so there's an apparent delay but it's just due to phase shifting not a decrease in c. but the photons never hit the electrons (or atoms) , just pass close enough to cause this -- else they'd be absorbed and destroyed.


    beautiful, will check it out it's already on my drive queued up and i didn't even realize , thanks for the reminder :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2013
  3. el Bert

    el Bert Senior member

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    Have you ever taken a conceptual physics coarse because color was described much differently that what you said shah.

    Think of it this way everything has the ability to absorb light and reflect light which we in return we consider color. It's what you said is perception which in some way is but it isn't because there are colors that are both real and not real that we make through pigments to fool out brain that they are there.

    Here's an article that kinda describes colors through light and colors through pigments that describes how pink isn't a real color even though its found in nature....but it's a perceptual thing.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencet...nk-doesnt-exist-just-pigment-imagination.html
     
  4. ibringdoom98

    ibringdoom98 Senior member

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    These are related to visualizing photons in slow-mo:
     
  5. MS007

    MS007 Senior member

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    Thats what last years Nobel prize was for.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2013
  6. slstr

    slstr Senior member

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    Link to more info about that, MS007?
     
  7. zapatiste

    zapatiste Senior member

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    Yeah I was looking at their stuff, not exactly imaging them, it's still cool any way
    http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/2012/wineland-lecture_slides.pdf
    http://m.livescience.com/23820-nobel-prize-physics-haroche-wineland.html
    http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/2012/press.html
    Can detect presence of a photon but sending an atom in a superposition of states through the dark cold chamber where a photon happily bounces without getting absorbed, and depending on the status of the atom upon exiting you know whether there was a photon in there. Or something like that anyway

    ElBert the key word in your post is "consider." You're still rely on interpretation through the brain (what you called "fool our brain")

    Those mit guys are real crazy or what..
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2013
  8. zapatiste

    zapatiste Senior member

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    lol what is this nonsense , what if you slapped them faster than the speed of sound ?

    * * *

    An over-elaborate experiment that just verifies more entanglement despite all the convolutions


    This group took it a step further, supposedly demonstrating entanglement across not only space but also time, between two photons that never existed cotemporally :eek:
     
  9. pickpackpockpuck

    pickpackpockpuck Senior member

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    that second example is pretty mindblowing. just the experiments these people come up with to test stuff are mindblowing, let alone the conclusions...

    entanglement occurs almost instantaneously across any distance (linked from that story: http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/...stance-at-least-10000-times-faster-than-light), so I suppose it occurs across any gap of time as well. i have no idea what this means, but it's fun to think about
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2013
  10. MS007

    MS007 Senior member

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    they would'nt see it coming, literally.

    I think your definition of imaging is flawed.




    Also, RIP Seamus Heaney





    "I returned to a long strand,

    the hammered curve of a bay,

    and found only the secular

    powers of the Atlantic thundering."



    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]




     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2013
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  11. zapatiste

    zapatiste Senior member

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    ^^ since all interactions require fields of some sort, there are suggestions that it appears instantaneous from our frames of reference but that they are just communication by reversing the arrow of time (so an electron e+ beceomes a positron e-) , the only restriction being that you can't use it to send information/signals. which is at least comforting.


    why so ? seems like nothing more than focusing of scattered particles of whatever you choose off your target, can be done with electrons on toasters, and reconstruct the image with some math.
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2013
  12. MS007

    MS007 Senior member

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    ok, thats fine. But scattering matter of a single photon is what earned Haroche the nobel prize.

    The problem with photons is, that they only interact with electrically charged matter. Since they are themselves not charged, you cannot scatter photons of photons (at least not classically).
    It is good that it is that way, because we would not see the sun (or anything) otherwise. Photons starting of from the sun would constantly rescatter and our eye would detect an intransparent lightsoup.

    You can in principle scatter electrons of photons. But photons travel with the speed of light. Hitting them in free flight is incredibly hard (we are not talking about a constant stream of light here, where you can move your hand through but a single photon).

    It is also hard to store them. And there is no known way to store photons that would be highly energetic enough to survive a scattering process with an electron. Even for scattering on atoms you need highly energetic laser beams. If you cannot store the photon and cannot hit it in free flight, how can you have something scatter off a single photon and proof the photon is still there?

    What one can store is a considerably less energetic microwave photon with superconducting mirrors for a tenth of a second.
    It basically bounces between two supermirrors until it is absorbed.
    But microwaves are not energetic enough to scatter off regular atoms.
    Thats why Haroche used Rydberg atoms. These are specifically engineered atoms with their electrons on the outermost shell (Those are huge, about the size of a virus). One step further and the atom would be ionized. This is the right size to be sensitive to microwaves. He send one of those Rydberg atoms through his "photon trap", it scatters with the photon and you can measure that by the phase shift of the rydberg atom compared to one that did not go through the trap. How can you show that the photon is still there? Well you can repeat the process and see if the next Rydberg atom entering the trap also has a phase shift.

    tldr: Haroche scattered Rydberg atoms off a single trapped microwave photon.
     
  13. zapatiste

    zapatiste Senior member

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    i know , but that's the whole problem, i'll never be able to see a photon imaged and that's not comforting.

    well, until i figure out how to become pure energy, that is.
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2013
  14. MS007

    MS007 Senior member

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    Yet there is not more to see from a living photon. At some point its a conceptional problem. You cannot smell an atom or hear a molecule, either.

    If you want to see the structure of a photon you need to destroy them (look up photon structure function).
     
  15. MS007

    MS007 Senior member

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  16. dotcomzzz

    dotcomzzz Senior member

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    clyfford still museum in denver. he was his own photon

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2013
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  17. spacepope

    spacepope Senior member

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    Clyfford Still museum so good highly recommended
     
  18. hendrix

    hendrix Senior member

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  19. spacepope

    spacepope Senior member

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    Hosotan (The Story of Smallpox, 1972)
    Hijikata Tatsumi

    nice article about Hijikata and Butoh here
     
  20. diniro

    diniro Senior member

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    this reminds me of some Gerhard Richter paintings.
     
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