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Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by sipang, Dec 8, 2011.

  1. sipang

    sipang Senior member

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    Hulu doesn't work outside the US saddly.



    oh why not

    Follow me
     
  2. thatoneguy

    thatoneguy Senior member

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  3. dotcomzzz

    dotcomzzz Senior member

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    ...
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2013
  4. the shah

    the shah Senior member

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    since the movie thread ship sailed off to a new shadowland, i'll just share this: LTE is fast

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    Last edited: Feb 26, 2013
    1 person likes this.
  5. wurm

    wurm Senior member

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    i'd like to join the movie club but can't really guarantee i'll be able to participate every week.
     
  6. the shah

    the shah Senior member

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    In Pursuit of Taste, en Masse
    by J. PEDER ZANE
    FEB. 11, 2013
    source

     
    3 people like this.
  7. the shah

    the shah Senior member

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    The Mughal dynasty (1526–1858) was among the richest and longest ruling in India, and at its peak controlled large portions of the Indian subcontinent. The Mughals were Muslims of Central Asian origin, and Persian was their court language. Their intermarriage with Hindu royalty and establishment of strong alliances with the diverse peoples of the subcontinent led to profound cultural, artistic, and linguistic exchanges.

    The Mughal dynasty claimed descent from the Mongols ("Mughal" is from the Arabized transliteration of "Moghol," or Mongol). The Mughal emperors were among India's greatest patrons of art, responsible for some of the country's most spectacular monuments, like the palaces at Delhi, Agra, and Lahore (in present-day Pakistan) and the famous mausoleum, the Taj Mahal (fig. 28).


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    Fig. 28. Taj Mahal, Agra, India, 1632–53. Commissioned by Shah Jahan

    The tastes and patronage of the first six rulers, known as the Great Mughals, defined Mughal art and architecture, and their influence has endured to this day. The works of art featured in this chapter highlight artistic production during the reigns of Jahangir (1605–27) and his son Shah Jahan (1627–58).


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    Fig. 29. Portrait of Jahangir (detail), about 1615–20; India; ink, opaque watercolor, and gold on paper; 14 x 9 1/2 in. (35.6 x 24.1cm); The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of Alexander Smith Cochran, 1913 (13.228.47)

    Emperor Jahangir (fig. 29) remains best known as a connoisseur and patron of the arts. His memoirs, the Tuzuk-i Jahangiri, describe opulent court events and sumptuous gifts in great detail. They also reflect the emperor's intense interest in the natural world—most evident in the meticulous descriptions of the plants and animals he encountered in India and during his travels. Jahangir is notable for his patronage of botanical paintings and drawings. In addition to works made at his own court, botanical albums with beautifully drawn and scientifically correct illustrations were brought to India by European merchants (see fig. 33). These inspired many of the works in Jahangir's court.

    Emperor Shah Jahan's court was unrivaled in its luxury. Like his father Jahangir, Shah Jahan (fig. 30) also had a strong interest in the natural world and a taste for paintings, jewel-encrusted objects (fig. 31), textiles, and works of art in other media. In spite of his large collection of portable works, Shah Jahan is best known for his architectural commissions, which include a huge palace in Delhi and the Taj Mahal (fig. 28), a mausoleum built for his favorite wife. Shah Jahan's architectural projects also reflect the Mughal love of botanical imagery; many of the Taj Mahal's walls are carved with intricate images of recognizable flowers and leaves (fig. 32).


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    Fig. 30. Shah Jahan on a Terrace, Holding a Pendant Set With His Portrait: Folio from the Shah Jahan Album (recto) (detail), dated 1627–28; artist: Chitarman (active about 1627–70); India; ink, opaque watercolor, and gold on paper; 15 5⁄16 x 10 1/8 in. (38.9 x 25.7 cm); The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Purchase, Rogers Fund and The Kevorkian Foundation Gift, 1955 (55.121.10.24)


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    Fig. 31. Mango-shaped flask, mid-17th century; India; rock crystal, set with gold, enamel, rubies, and emeralds; H. 2 1/2 in. (6.5 cm); The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Purchase, Mrs. Charles Wrightsman Gift, 1993 (1993.18).

    This small flask typifies the Mughal interest in natural forms and their transformation into richly decorated objects. The realistic mango shape was carved from rock crystal and encased in a web of golden strands of wire punctuated by rubies and emeralds. This flask is a practical vessel—possibly used to hold perfume or lime, an ingredient in pan, a mildly intoxicating narcotic popularly used in India—as well as a jewel-like decorative object that would have displayed the wealth and refined taste of its owner.


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    Fig. 32. Detail of wall showing highly naturalistic floral decoration, Taj Mahal, Agra, India, 1632–53.

    During the golden age of Mughal rule (approximately 1526–1707), the emperors had a marked interest in naturalistic depictions of people, animals, and the environment. They employed the most skilled artists, who documented courtiers and their activities as well as the flora and fauna native to India. Informed by Mughal patronage, a new style of painting emerged in illustrations made for books and albums, which combined elements of Persian, European, and native Indian traditions. These works demonstrate keen observation of the natural environment and the royal court. The emperors collected their favorite poetry, calligraphy, drawings, and portraits in extensive albums, which were among their most valued personal possessions and were passed down to successive generations.

    In addition to works on paper, the decorative arts of the Mughal court engaged a broad range of natural forms in carpets, textiles, jewelry, and luxuriously inlaid decorative objects, and used precious materials ranging from gemstones and pearls to silk.

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    The Emperor Shah Jahan with His Son Dara Shikoh: Folio from the Shah Jahan Album (verso)
    About 1620
    Artist: Nanha (active 1605–27)
    India
    Ink, opaque watercolor, and gold on paper; margins: gold and opaque watercolor on dyed paper; 15 5/16 x 10 5/16 in. (38.9 x 26.2 cm)
    The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Purchase, Rogers Fund and The Kevorkian Foundation Gift, 1955 (55.121.10.36)

    Mughal empire, courtly life, Emperor Shah Jahan, natural world, album, figural art, plants, birds, watercolor, ink

    This painting demonstrates the Mughals' focus on portraiture as well as their love of precious objects (see fig. 30). It presents two realistic depictions of the Mughal royal family—the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan and his eldest son, Dara Shikoh, who are shown examining precious stones.

    The painting comes from an album begun by Emperor Jahangir and continued by his son Shah Jahan. The album was created for private viewing and study by the emperor.

    Two figures are seated on a golden throne furnished with luxurious cushions. Shah Jahan admires the large ruby clasped in his right hand, while his son—who is facing him—looks toward the bowl of precious stones resting in his father's left hand. The emperor is clad in a red and yellow striped turban with a plume, a white double-breasted gown called a jama, a richly embroidered sash, and a violet garment called a pajama. On his right thumb is a jeweled ring, which could be used to draw the string of a hunting bow. The handle of a jeweled dagger, signaling his supremely important position in the court, is visible just above his waist.

    Prince Dara Shikoh is dressed in a yellow jama fastened with a sash. In one hand he holds a turban pin, in the other a fly whisk made from a peacock feather. Multiple strands of pearls adorn Dara Shikoh; under Mughal rule, pearls were a hallmark of nobility, and princes and princesses were almost always portrayed with them.

    The patron of this painting was most likely Shah Jahan's father, Emperor Jahangir, who was interested in realistic and masterfully drawn depictions of people, animals, and plants. The wide border that frames the painting contains precisely rendered images of flowers and birds. In the upper right corner are flowers, including narcissus, roses, poppies, and crocus. The Mughal style of creating botanically accurate flowers was informed by the presence of European botanical prints in the court (fig. 33). Birds, such as chukar partridges, demoiselle cranes, pigeons, Indian peafowl, and Birds of Paradise (symbolizing royalty), are also depicted with skillful realism. All the birds are native to the Mughal territories and still exist in present-day India and Pakistan.


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    Fig. 33. Crocus, folio 61 of Le Jardin du Roy tres Chrestien Henry IV Roy de France et de Navare, 1608; designer: Pierre Vallet (French, about 1575–1657); The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Harris Brisbane Dick Fund, 1935 (35.67.3)

    This type of illustration, from a European botanical album, influenced the paintings produced at the Mughal court. Notice the crocus in the top right corner of the margin of image 30.

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    Dagger with hilt in the form of a blue bull (nilgai )
    About 1640
    India
    The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of Alice Heeramaneck, in memory of Nasli Heeramaneck, 1985 (1985.58a)

    Mughal empire, royal hunt, dagger, Emperor Shah Jahan, natural world, album, animals, nephrite (jade), steel

    Mughal emperors were keen observers of animals and the blue bull (nilgai)—a large antelope native to India—was among their favorites. The intimate familiarity with the features of the blue bull, as well as the fine quality of the carving, suggest that this dagger was made in the royal workshop by someone with access to the imperial zoo, which would have housed both native and foreign animals.

    Finely carved daggers such as this were seldom used as weapons, but rather were part of the royal ceremonial costume of the Mughal court. Surviving daggers featuring animal heads are relatively rare, and were probably worn by those of the highest status at the Mughal court.

    The head of the blue bull, which forms the handle of this dagger, features thin hollow ears, delicately carved facial features, and grooves along the neckline where the owner could rest his fingers. At the base of the hilt, a lotuslike flower rests in a leaf scroll, which bulges over the edge—a feature that prevents the hand from slipping from the smooth handle onto the sharp blade. The blue tone of the jade (nephrite) resembles the animal's coat, which was admired for its bluish gray hue.

    The Mughal emperors' interest in animals might be considered paradoxical by today's standards. They admired animals for their beauty, enjoyed observing them in the wild and in the imperial zoo, but also were avid hunters and even held animal fights at the court where courtiers could place bets on their favorites. Court painters were often present during these fights and sketched the animals from life (fig. 34).

    While the Mughals' Islamic faith informed their disapproval of large-scale figurative sculpture, India had a rich indigenous sculptural tradition, which influenced Mughal art. This figural tradition was transformed by the Mughals into objects such as this one—small in scale and finely executed. The genre of small-scale animal sculptures and depictions flourished in Mughal India, and the handle of this dagger, with its realistically carved head of a blue bull, is a prime example of this trend.


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    Fig. 34. Blue Bull (Nilgai  ): Folio from the Shah Jahan Album (verso), about 1620; artist: Mansur (active 1589–1629); India; ink, opaque watercolor, and gold on paper; 15 5/16 x 10 1/16 in. (38.9 x 25.6 cm); The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Purchase, Rogers Fund and The Kevorkian Foundation Gift, 1955 (55.121.10.13)

    According to Emperor Jahangir's memoirs, the blue bull (nilgai ) was commonly encountered on royal hunts. This illustration is by the court artist Mansur, who often accompanied the ruler on his hunts. He had a special talent for observing and depicting nature, and shows how the bull would have appeared in the wild. Blue bulls still live in the grasslands of present-day India, Pakistan, and Nepal.

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    Red-Headed Vulture and Long-Billed Vulture: Folio from the Shah Jahan Album (verso)
    About 1615–20
    Artist: Mansur (active 1589–1629)
    India
    Ink, opaque watercolor, and gold on paper; 15 3/8 x 10 1/16 in. (39.1 x 25.6 cm)
    The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Purchase, Rogers Fund and the Kevorkian Foundation Gift, 1955 (55.121.10.12)
     
    4 people like this.
  8. artishard116

    artishard116 Senior member

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    Here is a place I made to store my various creative things, anonymously, that fall outside of the professional realm. Since we don't have a 'Creations' thread I though it might fit here among the other things that don't fit in.

    http://thev01d.tumblr.com/
     
    2 people like this.
  9. slstr

    slstr Senior member

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    Cool stuff man, are those waterfall photos Iceland?
     
  10. artishard116

    artishard116 Senior member

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    yes indeed. and most importantly GLACIERS
     
    1 person likes this.
  11. slstr

    slstr Senior member

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    More pictures must be posted, Iceland is my dream travel destination.
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2013
  12. artishard116

    artishard116 Senior member

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    It's amazing. Highly recommend. Landscape is so alien, which is sublime (for a sci-fi dork). Also, snowmobiling on glaciers, snorkeling in glacier run-off streams, exploring lava caves, hot springs, etc. Standing on no-man's land which is slowly sinking as the tectonic plates move away from each other. I want to go back.
     
  13. the shah

    the shah Senior member

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    Gnomes, dont forget the gnomes
     
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  14. g transistor

    g transistor Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    art I love it. This is the most metal thing ever
     
  15. artishard116

    artishard116 Senior member

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    It was nuts, there was an entire field of those. The guide told me they ship tons of them to developing areas that have a hard time finding a plentiful protein source. Apparently it's good for soup!
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2013
  16. the shah

    the shah Senior member

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    WHAT ARE YOU?
    The one and only you
    There are flaws in our intuitive beliefs about what makes us who we are. Who are we really, asks philosopher Jan Westerhoff

    WHEN ARE YOU?
    You think you live in the present?
    Our brains create our own version of reality to help us make sense of things. But this means we're living outside time, says Jan Westerhoff

    WHERE ARE YOU?
    Trick yourself into an outer-body experience
    Your mind isn't as firmly anchored in your body as you think, says Anil Ananthaswamy. Time for some sleight of hand

    WHY ARE YOU?
    Why are you like you are?
    You're so vain, you probably think your self is about you, says Michael Bond. The truth is slightly more complicated

     
    4 people like this.
  17. noob in 89

    noob in 89 Senior member

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    What would it take, I began to wonder, for me to transform into a man?

    ...

    Towards the end of the afternoon, Diane gives me her best and most disturbing piece of advice.

    "Don't look at the world from the surface of your eyeballs." she says. "All your feminine availability emanates from there. Set your gaze back in your head. Try to get the feeling that your gaze originates from two inches behind the surface of your eyeballs, from where your optic nerve begins in your brain. Keep it right there."

    Immediately, I get what she's saying. I pull my gaze back. I don't know how I appear from the outside, but the internal effect is appalling. I feel -- for the first time in my life -- an immense barrier rise before my vision, keeping me at a palpable distance from the world, roping me off from the people in the room. I feel dead-eyed. I feel like a reptile. I feel my whole face change, settling into a hard mask.

    -- Elizabeth Gilbert, My Life As a Man (GQ, Aug. 2001)
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2013
  18. KingJulien

    KingJulien Senior member

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    Bump! This thread got away from me, took me like a month to catch up.

    Thick Fog Turns Dubai into a City Above the Clouds

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    Dubai-based German photographer Sebastian Opitz captures the surreal and mystical look of his adopted city as fog rolls in and out at sunrise. The photographer renames the cityscape as Cloud City for the brief moments when the mist takes over and fills the empty space between the towering buildings. Optiz's images offer a serene and dreamy view of a bustling city, re-imagining it as a heavenly metropolis in the sky.
    The photographer says, "I've been living in Dubai for over four years now and always dreamed of taking one of those rare shots from above the fog. This only happens on 4 - 6 days per year and when it happens it will be over by 9 AM. So one has to make sure to be up on the roof of a tower before sunrise and hope for the best." Luckily, Opitz was there to catch the magical event from high above the city on the 85th floor of the Princess Tower.
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    Last edited: Mar 22, 2013
    6 people like this.
  19. Lionheart Biker

    Lionheart Biker Senior member

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    Reminds me of Bioshock Infinite´s Columbia.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2013
  20. sipang

    sipang Senior member

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    [​IMG]
     
    3 people like this.

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