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Synthese

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classic mashups



This one's one of my favorites...picks up on some weird shit from the original star trek that is absolutely there if you've ever watched it

[VIDEO][/VIDEO]​
 
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tween_spirit

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No, not remotely...you must have impeccable luck on YouTube :D

This isn't a technically a mashup but is fun to watch anyway :)

I like it when homemade music videos work like this, instead of generic archival footage and stuff like that.

[VIDEO][/VIDEO]

edit: 5 years ago! damn..
 

sipang

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classic mashups



This one's one of my favorites...picks up on some weird shit from the original star trek that is absolutely there if you've ever watched it​



Haha

"Many people consider Spirk to be canon, because of the Backrub Scene in the TOS episode, Shore Leave."
 

pickpackpockpuck

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Excerpts from the Here, Anywhere series by the photographer Tamas Dezso. The photos are of Hungary.








From his website:
"The map of Hungary is speckled with capsules of time. During the political transformation twenty years ago, as the country experienced change it simply forgot about certain places – streets, blocks of flats, vacant sites and whole districts became self-defined enclosures, where today a certain out-dated, awkward, longed-to-be-forgotten Eastern Europeanness still lingers. There are places which seem to be at one with other parts of the city in a single space, but their co-existence in time is only apparent; places which decompose in accordance with their own specific chronology, determined by their past, such that what remains would then either be silently reconquered by nature or enveloped by the lifestyles of tomorrow’s generations. Of the inhabitants, who have never fully integrated with majority society, soon only traces will remain, until they, too, disappear in the course of time.

I do not observe these mini-universes in the hope of recording entirety, but rather aim to capture the essence of these worlds by elevating certain arbitrarily chosen details into embodiments of a disappearing existence. The series begun in 2009 examines the typically transitional period and symbolic locations of post-communist space which, due to disinterest or thoughtlessness, are slowly vanishing, fading into images, with the result that their inimitable existence may cease to be present by tomorrow. But for the time being, they are still around. Here."
http://www.tamas-dezso.com/index.php?page=work&id=4
 

the shah

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anyone else enjoys arabic/turkish coffee ?

well anyway ... this is what i do. would be interested in alternatives but it's still tasty like this


  • boil water before hand, and to the little stove-top pot with cardamom seeds.
  • pour in the sugar but don't stir -- this allows the sugar to slowly collect at the bottom and caramelize rather than sweeten the whole liquid. it will have a distinctly different flavor
  • for each small cup of coffee, one cup of water and one heaping spoon of beans is used, ultra fine grind of course
    * no need to mix the grinds either as the water will soon boil over it and drag them into the chaotic interior​
  • allow the mixture to boil and rise up, remove from heat. repeat this 3 times, or 7 times. (no idea why, but it's 3 or 7 and nothing else)
  • after removing the final time, there will be a filmy layer on the top, crema as it's known in the espresso world. scoop some into the bottom of each cup
  • gently pour the coffee into the serving cups and let sit for a minute or two
  • enjoy

 

miran

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shahinshah, you sure know how to make a person homesick when they get back!

Firstly shahinshah, It's called Greek or Turkish coffee...wtf is Arabic coffee? Stop adding shit to it...cardomom?!? must be an arabic thing.

Use the thing they call a briki (in Greek language) or jezve (in Turkish language). The long handle will allow you handle it easily and the Erlenmeyer-like shape means it will bubble up nicely without boiling over. I think in your stupid language, it's called Ibriq or Abriq or something..."Water-holder"...

Add your roasted grinds to it...you don't have to use Turkish grind...any good grind that's nicely roasted will do. My Mamma uses a coarser grind to get a smokier flavour. If you like coffee to be "sketo"...add no sugar. If you like "metrio"...add sugar and mix it all up in the jezve.
Add your water. Stir, but leave the coffee chunky/suspended....and then throw away your spoon....after this, you don't touch the liquid.

Place on your heat source. Any heat source will do. Just don't touch the liquid...let it do its own thing and the magic will follow. Allow it to heat up, but don't boil it... It's so easy today because we can control the heat setting on the stovetop, but in the old days, they used heat diffusers over the coals. My yiayia still does this.
Once it brews up....the foam will form..you are right. The shape of the briki will allow the foam to nicely form. It's called "kaimaki" in Greek language, schiuma in Italian language. I don't know why you call it crema in the USA....but then I don't know why you call a sugary coffee-flavoured drink a latte either...latte just means "milk".

You are right...once it froths up, take it off the heat....don't touch the liquid. Allow it to subside...and place it back on the heat...and repeat. You are right, you do it 3 times....once for each of the Holy Trinity. I have never heard of 7 times...maybe that's something you people do....one for each of the 7 layers of hell that La Divina comedia says you people will go through...

Pour it into a cup, carefully pouring in a nice thick layer of schiuma into each cup. A coffee with no schiuma is called in Greek "barefoot coffee". It comes from a famous proverb in Greek..."We may be peasants, but we still wear shoes"....meaning some things are essential in life, no matter how poor or humble you are...essentials like shoes and schiuma on your coffee.

Finally, shahinshah....coffee making is woman's work, ideally old lady work.....I thought you people would know that better than most....

Happy Feast of the Epiphany/Thephany/Twelfth Night/Twelfth Day of Christmas...
 
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jwjp

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There's an amazing family-run turkish coffee shop in my home town hidden in a cellar down a back street behind the arcade. Almost impossible to find. Every time I've been I (or the group I'm in) have been the only custom and this huge mustachiod man with fists larger than my head and his equally large son bring out these tiny dainty cups of coffee. The best coffee i've ever tasted, and super cheap; I have no idea how they make a living though
 

the shah

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miran i think you're right , the cardamom is afro-arabic style. my somali homie uses it. not you Mediterraneans

There's an amazing family-run turkish coffee shop in my home town hidden in a cellar down a back street behind the arcade. Almost impossible to find. Every time I've been I (or the group I'm in) have been the only custom and this huge mustachiod man with fists larger than my head and his equally large son bring out these tiny dainty cups of coffee. The best coffee i've ever tasted, and super cheap; I have no idea how they make a living though

a hint :

[COLOR=777777]The Arifs are a South East London-based Turkish Cypriot criminal organization heavily involved in armed robbery, contract killing, drug trafficking and other racketeering-related activities within London's underworld since the late 1960s.[/COLOR]​
 

the shah

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btw miran jaan, i was on your disputed island some 2 decades ago. the turkish side was fenced off so i didn't get to go but it was quite a dump at that time anyway. i saw zorba the greek live there, it was quite a hypnotic performance !

[VIDEO][/VIDEO]
 
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miran

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btw miran jaan, i was on your disputed island some 2 decades ago. the turkish side was fenced off so i didn't get to go but it was quite a dump at that time anyway. i saw zorba the greek live there, it was quite a hypnotic performance !

oddly enough shahinshah, another member pm'ed me earlier today also about cyprus, trying to order stuff from online stores there....
cyprus is a shithole, period. it is the dirtiest place in the world. people are filthy...how can you not be when you have to live with those other people? there is garbage everywhere, and garbage outmasses sand on the beaches. a shame really. it's been fucked since 1570 since you people conquered it from the venetians and skinned the last venetian governor alive...it's been a write-off ever since...
Halloumi is good though. Fried Halloumi is fantastic...everything else from there is shit.
what on earth is zorba the greek live?
 

tween_spirit

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pickpack: as far as I can tell it is
 

the shah

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Amin Gholami, right, dances in Azeri-style as Aydin Kanani plays a Gaval, a large tambourine, in the Gharadagh mountainous area in northwestern, Iran, on October 26, 2011. In the 1980s, Iran's music almost vanished. Music schools went into full recession, police or militias stopped cars to check what passengers were listening to and broke tapes playing pre-revolutionary singers, and clerical institutions even banned music as un-Islamic. But Iran's social life has dramatically changed a decade later, with a landslide victory of former President Mohammad Khatami relaxing some of rigid restrictions on cultural and social activities, including bans on music bands, but Iran has recently tightened censorship of books, films, and music since President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad came to power. (AP Photo)

Wearing traditional dress, Salameh Bazmandegan, poses during a visit to "Darreyeh Setaregan" or Stars Valley, a tourist site on the Iranian island of Qeshm, which oversees the strategic waterway, the Strait of Hormuz, on December 23, 2011. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)

Iranian villagers work in a rice field during the annual harvest season on the outskirts of the city of Amol, in Mazandran province, on the southern coast of the Caspian Sea, on July 30, 2011. Rice is the main staple in Iranian cuisine. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

The Chogha Zanbil Ziggurat near Susa, in Khuzestan province, southwestern Iran, photographed on September 29, 2011. The ziggurat was built around 1250 BC by the king Untash-Napirisha, and in 1979 it became the first Iranian site to be included on the UNESCO World Heritage List. (Reuters/Raheb Homavandi)

A view of Palangan village in Kurdistan province, about 660 km (412 miles) southwest of Tehran, on May 11, 2011. Iranian Shi'ite and Sunni Kurds live in harmony with each other in Palangan, although Sunni is the religion of the majority of the people. (Reuters/Morteza Nikoubazl)

A weaver works on a carpet at a carpet workshop in Isfahan, Iran, on November 14, 2011. Persian carpets can be mostly divided into three size groups: large (3x4 meters), medium (2x3 meters) and small (1x1.5 meters), which is called Ghaliche. For a larger 24-square-meter silk carpet, every 70 cm (27.5 inches) section takes about a month to make. The price of each carpet is set by officials from Iran's national carpet company after examining each completed work. (Reuters/Morteza Nikoubazl)

A woman poses for a picture in front of the beached Greek ship Moula F, during sunset off Kish Island, 1,250 km (777 miles) south of Tehran, on April 27, 2011. The ship ran aground on the southwest side of the island en route to Greece and was abandoned after salvage efforts proved unfeasible. (Reuters/Caren Firouz)

Iranian Ghashghai men play a traditional game called Dorna Bazi during a nomadic pastoralist festival in northern Tehran, on September 16, 2011. The Ghashghai are Iran's largest nomadic pastoralist group who live in Fars, Khuzestan and southern Isfahan province. Each year they travel with their flocks from Shiraz in the hot season to the winter pastures near the Persian Gulf. (Reuters/Morteza Nikoubazl)

An Iranian family walks on the solidified salts of Oroumieh Lake, some 370 mi (600 km) northwest of Tehran, on April 29, 2011. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)

An Iranian Sunni Kurd shepherd carries a lamb as he walks on a road next to a grassland in Divandare in Kurdistan province, 540 km (338 miles) west of Tehran, on May 13, 2011. (Reuters/Morteza Nikoubazl)

The stained hand of a worker at a carpet workshop in Qom, 120 km (75 mi) south of Tehran, on November 12, 2011. (Reuters/Morteza Nikoubazl)
 

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