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Solid (non-navy) Sport Coats

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Parker, Jul 15, 2011.

  1. tchoy

    tchoy Senior member

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    Herringbone solids are great.

    Have this one in the works at the moment blue Donegal herringbone from London Lounge Cloth Club. Here is a picture of Michael Alden wearing it splendidly.



    [​IMG]



    I am thinking about this one as the next commission silvery grey Loro Piana Cashmere as a sports coat.

    [​IMG]
     


  2. james_timothy

    james_timothy Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    NOBD doing a good job with a solid jacket.
     


  3. Exin

    Exin Well-Known Member

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    Go for something more texturized like linen and fresco, or camelhair for the winter
     


  4. Exin

    Exin Well-Known Member

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    Go for something more texturized, like linen and fresco, or camelhair for the winter
     


  5. tim_horton

    tim_horton Senior member

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    Couldn't agree more.
     


  6. NorCal_1

    NorCal_1 Senior member

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    I think the key to single color sportcoats is to go with something more sophisticated than the single color - ie. a melange - that appears to be a single color from afar, but becomes much more interesting up close

    the variety in the weave of tweeds makes this easy to accomplish

    from afar, this swatch below looks like a brown herringbone tweed, but up close, the flecks of green and rust give it a much more complex look. Why choose a flat tweed when something like this is readily still available?

    spend time finding tweeds like this

    [​IMG]
     


  7. Achilles_

    Achilles_ Senior member

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    I missed out on a brown birdseye belvest SC recently, I've been kicking myself since :facepalm:
     


  8. Achilles_

    Achilles_ Senior member

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    I really like this look! I know some people on here hate blue/navy pants, but I love them!

    PS - How do you use spoiler tags in this new forum?
     


  9. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    I like jackets that are "functionally solid" rather than actually solid. Aside from blue. Also, I like to wear the jacket from a linen suit in summer.

    But, otherwise, herringbone is nice. It works as a solid without being quite as boring or looking like a suit. I have herringbone in brown, gray and blue gray. The brown gets worn probably more than any other fall/winter coat. I think it's the same cloth as the swatch posted above. Looks like that anyway.
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2011


  10. Parker

    Parker Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Yeah, I really like herringbone, too. Just enough pattern to keep it interesting. This one caught my eye. I tend to like a lot of medium toned cloth, but then have to make sure there is enough contrast with my medium gray trou.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2011


  11. TRINI

    TRINI Senior member

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    The Loro Piana herringbone that PSG picked for his latest Mina commission looks heavenly...and right up your alley.
     


  12. wmb

    wmb Senior member

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    I have a P&H very similar to this -- it is very versatile [​IMG][​IMG]
     


  13. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    I would be careful with Harris, guys. It's really thick and warm. Nice stuff but somewhat impractical unless you live somewhere really cold and/or spend a lot time out of doors. Shetland is more versatile.
     


  14. Parker

    Parker Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Thanks Manton. I would probably burn up in the Harris. Any advice on who makes a good shetland?
     


  15. Holdfast

    Holdfast Senior member

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    At risk of perhaps playing Devil's Advocate and taking the thread off-topic, it seems we're reaching an warm and fuzzy consensus (which I agree with) that solid non-navy odd jackets look best when either in a fairly heavily textured fabric/weave or have a faint other pattern but are functionally solid from a distance.

    Why then is there such wide general acceptance of flat-looking worsted solid navy blazers? While traditionally one might argue that navy blazers should have texture (I think they were made in a serge originally, so would have had at least a moderately prominent weave), most RTW blazers these days are a very flat - IMO boring - smooth worsted finish. It's not as if SF is a lone island immune to this either. At least, judging from various pics posted over the years, for "proper" blazers, many remain fond of flat-looking blazers still, even when there is the opportunity to order a rougher/textured or subtly patterned finish. I think if I were to get a true navy blazer (as opposed to occasionally using half a summer suit with cream MOP buttons as one occasionally), I would definitely want a significant extra interest to the fabric. Anyway, I'm curious as to whether there is a divergence between navy and non-navy odd jacket feeling?
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2011


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