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So...my cutting board died

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by otc, Sep 22, 2008.

  1. otc

    otc Senior member

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    I found out today that my nice bamboo cutting board took a run through the dishwasher. The "wood" looked pretty much dried out and felt rough.

    Is there anything I should do? It's a small bamboo board that I use mainly for cutting limes for drinks...so its not a huge loss but it had quickly become one of my favorite kitchen items.

    Currently I have it sitting in a pool of mineral oil, hoping I can soak some moisture back into it. Maybe I will have to sand it smooth again afterwards (the 2 edges where the bamboo fibers come to an end got especially rough feeling).
     
  2. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    Sand it- probably best had you done so before oiling.... and I probably would have used a food-grade oil... but I'm not sure bamboo reacts well to oiling anyway.
     
  3. J Simulcik

    J Simulcik Senior member

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    Mineral oil: As long as it's a food-grade mineral oil, you're good. Mineral oil is actually preferable to vegetable oil for those chefs still using wooden boards because a board so treated will not pick up aromas as easily.

    Dishwasher: I've washed bamboo boards in the dishwasher before with no soap and they turn out fine. I only worry that with the heat of the dishwasher, the fibers will have expanded and trapped soap particles once they compressed again. Cutting on such a board would introduce soap into your food, something you probably don't want.
     
  4. otc

    otc Senior member

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    yeah, it is food grade mineral oil that I use on all of my wood kitchen products.

    This would have been a standard soap run of the dishwasher, possibly with heated dry turned on (I was not the one to run or load it). It probably should have been sanded before oil but I didnt realize just how rough it was until feeling it slathered in oil. Hopefully soaking it in oil won't cause a sudden influx of moisture and cause it to warp/split.

    I have quite enjoyed my bamboo items, I'm glad to see it becoming more prevalent--if I was ever in the position to choose a flooring material, I think it would be high on my list.
     
  5. amerikajinda

    amerikajinda Senior member

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    if I was ever in the position to choose a flooring material, I think it would be high on my list.
    Bamboo flooring is beautiful! [​IMG]
     
  6. Thomas

    Thomas Senior member

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    Bamboo flooring is beautiful! [​IMG]


    Installing it in the house at the moment. Well, not RIGHT NOW, but when I get home. It's very nice.
     
  7. amerikajinda

    amerikajinda Senior member

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    Installing it in the house at the moment. Well, not RIGHT NOW, but when I get home. It's very nice.
    Very cool! I'd love to see pictures when your project is complete... [​IMG]
     
  8. Thomas

    Thomas Senior member

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    Very cool! I'd love to see pictures when your project is complete... [​IMG]

    Will happen once power returns and I can rip the last row of boards to width. Should be done this weekend.

    However, it is manufactured and pre-finished. I did a maple floor with raw tongue-and-groove utility-grade wood, and it was a bear to do up right. I resented wood for a long time afterwards, between the patching and the sanding and the multiple layers of varnish.

    Just don't want you gents to think I'm out on the back patio splitting bamboo reeds and tying them together into a floor.
     
  9. esquire.

    esquire. Senior member

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    Mineral oil: As long as it's a food-grade mineral oil, you're good. Mineral oil is actually preferable to vegetable oil for those chefs still using wooden boards because a board so treated will not pick up aromas as easily.

    If we're talking about bamboo cutting board, is there a difference between using mineral oil or bamboo oil?

    I'm not a fan of bamboo floors- they scratch rather easily and once scratched, you really can't sand them down like other wood floors.
     
  10. Reggs

    Reggs Senior member

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    Bamboo is a bad material for cutting boards. There is too much drag, and it dulls blades quickly.
     
  11. Working Stiff

    Working Stiff Senior member

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    What is a good material for cutting boards? I need a new one.
     
  12. Infrasonic

    Infrasonic Senior member

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    What is a good material for cutting boards? I need a new one.

    Virgins thighs...quite pricey though.
     
  13. Douglas

    Douglas Senior member

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    I have never had a real big-timer cutting board, but I have come to the conclusion that all wooden cutting boards are a massive PITA and a good old, nice, big plastic one from Sam's Club is the way to go. Easy to clean, plenty of working space, not a pain to lug around to the sink, low maintenance, impervious to nasties. I keep a nice looking one on the countertop for effect, but actually try to do most chopping on plastic these days.
     
  14. otc

    otc Senior member

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    What is a good material for cutting boards? I need a new one.

    Epicurean; go one size bigger than the size you think you want because cramped workspaces suck.

    Also, why did my thread get revived? While the mineral oil soak did revive the original bamboo board...I have stopped using bamboo as a serious cutting surface due to the dulling issue.
     
  15. Dmax

    Dmax Senior member

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    What is a good material for cutting boards? I need a new one.
    Maple is the golden standard. Walnut, cherry, mahagony and some other hard woods are also good. End grain construction is superior to edge grain. Big timers should look here: The Boardsmith . Small timers and average timers should check out some butcher block makers on Ebay. I like wood for veggies and other ready-to-eat stuff. For raw meats I prefer a synthetic white poly board which is easy to sanitize. The commercial Sani-tuff yellow rubber boards are durable and easy to clean but rather ugly.
     
  16. greg_atlanta

    greg_atlanta Senior member

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    big plastic one from Sam's Club is the way to go. Easy to clean, plenty of working space, not a pain to lug around to the sink, low maintenance, impervious to nasties.

    I've heard bacteria actually thrives on plastic cutting boards, while wood has more natural resistance to nasties.

    The new thing is color-coded flexible plastic mats (they look like placemats) which you use for each food group... but haven't tried them.
     
  17. ama

    ama Senior member

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    Maple is the golden standard.

    The commercial Sani-tuff yellow rubber boards are durable and easy to clean but rather ugly.


    I have a maple Boos that more or less stays on my counter and a couple of these: http://www.globeequipment.com/Catalog/TEK!157628.html in different sizes for messier tasks. I highly recommend the rubber boards, really easy to care for and use.
     
  18. Dmax

    Dmax Senior member

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    I've heard bacteria actually thrives on plastic cutting boards, while wood has more natural resistance to nasties.
    It appears wood actually absorbs bacteria through capillary action which makes them less likely to contaminate other things cut on the same board later. Plastic doesn't absorb the bacteria but is easier to clean as long as it does not have substantial gouges that bacteria can collect in. Here is a good article about cutting boards by Chad Ward, who wrote a book about kitchen knives.
     

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