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slow roasting prime cuts

Mr Herbert

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I have a large scotch fillet (rib eye steak) which id like to roast. usually id do this in a very hot oven but the problem is that leaves the fat vein pretty much in tact and chewy. My wife thinks all fat is bad (i tried to explain this is grass fed beef) so id like to try and slow cook it to give the fat time to render.

my plan is to do it in an oven ~200F for as long as it takes (its 6lb so im guestimating about 6 hours).

My question is, if i still want to get the caramelisation on the outside should i give it a blast in a hot oven to start with (and brown it) or wait until the internal temp is nearly where i want it and jack up the temperature of the oven at the end?

The other option is to pan fry the whole thing before or after.

Any suggestions>
 

alliswell

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Your wife is right about the fat - grass-fed has nothing to do with it. You're right about the fat - it tastes great.
 

kaxixi

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Originally Posted by alliswell
Your wife is right about the fat - grass-fed has nothing to do with it.

Oh?
 

zippyh

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We did two 4 bone roasts for xmas dinner. Seared them on the stove before doing the 200 degree oven thing. I set the temp probe to beep at 123(I think). Then I cranked the oven to 500 and let it go until 125. I liked the results. Very pink all the way through.
 

indesertum

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Originally Posted by alliswell
Your wife is right about the fat - grass-fed has nothing to do with it. You're right about the fat - it tastes great.
ignore this dude. grass fed beef has lower fat and better fat (omega 3s) thomas keller advocates using a blow torch to lightly brown the fat and then cooking in a 275 degree oven until its 128 degrees at the center (approx 2 hours) for 4 1/2 lb. apparently lightly browning will help it develop a nice browned surface even at such a low temperature
 

alliswell

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Originally Posted by indesertum
ignore this dude. grass fed beef has lower fat and better fat (omega 3s)


While the analysis is favorable to grass-fed beef, it's not clear whether the nutritional differences in the two types of meat have any meaningful impact on human health. For instance, the levels of healthful omega-3s are still far lower than those found in fatty fish like salmon. And as the study authors note, consumers of grain-fed beef can increase their levels of healthful CLAs by eating slightly fattier cuts.
http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/0...rass-fed-beef/
 

jblazing

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Originally Posted by indesertum
ignore this dude. grass fed beef has lower fat and better fat (omega 3s)

thomas keller advocates using a blow torch to lightly brown the fat and then cooking in a 275 degree oven until its 128 degrees at the center (approx 2 hours) for 4 1/2 lb. apparently lightly browning will help it develop a nice browned surface even at such a low temperature


I thought fat was fat. It's metabolized and turned into fat by a cow. If it has omega 3's it's helpful, but that is only if the feed contained omega 3 fatty acids. By the way, that fat is also fat.
 

indesertum

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While the analysis is favorable to grass-fed beef, it's not clear whether the nutritional differences in the two types of meat have any meaningful impact on human health. For instance, the levels of healthful omega-3s are still far lower than those found in fatty fish like salmon. And as the study authors note, consumers of grain-fed beef can increase their levels of healthful CLAs by eating slightly fattier cuts.
Originally Posted by alliswell
http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/0...rass-fed-beef/

all your quote says is that grass feed beef doesnt have as much omega 3s as fatty fish and if you eat a lot of fat you can also get a lot of CLAs

if i was in kindergarten here i would say something like duh

1. the healthiness of grass feed beef is in comparison with grain fed beef. obviously fatty fish has more omega3s. does this mean you should only eat fatty fish? no it means when you eat beef you should eat grass fed beef as it it relatively more nutritious than grain fed beef.

2. the point is eating as much as CLAs as possible without eating too much fat. sure you can eat a ton of beef fat and get the same amount of CLAs, but I would think that you would agree that this isn't optimal.

3. something you didnt mention, but i feel like it could be a point of issue is that grass fed beef taste as good as grain fed beef if you have switch the cows over to high quality grain a few weeks before they are slaughtered.
 

indesertum

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Originally Posted by jblazing
I thought fat was fat. It's metabolized and turned into fat by a cow. If it has omega 3's it's helpful, but that is only if the feed contained omega 3 fatty acids. By the way, that fat is also fat.
eating just regular grass not enriched by omega 3s have been shown to produce beef that has omega 3 acids in higher content, not just in the meat but also in the milk. also fat is not just fat, as different fat molecules are digested and incorporated differently into your body. some have more harmful byproducts than others. you are right in that fat is fat if you're just simply talking about energy in the fat molecule, but again different molecules are taken apart at a different efficiency than others (ie some have higher thermic effects leading to your body to gain less energy than otherwise)
 

lemmywinks

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I did my first roast ever for Christmas and I had a $110 piece of meat that I was scared to screw up. http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/p...ipe/index.html I did that and it was great. It takes forever but it is pretty fucking good. Best beef I've ever had except for Kobe Beef which is like comparing apples to oranges. I also added garlic, horseradish, rosemary and thyme to the salt and pepper and I made a really delicious crust. After cooking it was just one piece of burnt meat but once you remove the crust the beef was perfect and the part of the crust that made it was delicious.
 

Mr Herbert

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Originally Posted by indesertum
thomas keller advocates using a blow torch to lightly brown the fat and then cooking in a 275 degree oven until its 128 degrees at the center (approx 2 hours) for 4 1/2 lb. apparently lightly browning will help it develop a nice browned surface even at such a low temperature

ive seen Heston Blumenthal do the same thing on In Search of Perfection.

I dont have a blowtorch but think i will pan fry it instead. Maybe brown it slowly in butter as per a steak.

Ive heard beef fat renders above 58C (~150F) so the aim will be to hold it above this temperature as long as possible. I apreciate Keller is considered the man in these matters around here so i will try 275F even tho im tempted to go even lower (200F).

Just for clarification what i refer to as scotch fillet is the fillet off the bone. i picked up a (large) bunch of these from a local farmer for about $6/lb so will be trying a few different ways of cooking them.
 

Mr Herbert

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as for the debate about fat im convinced grassfed is better for a variety of reasons - omega-3s, beta-carotine, CLAs etc. The fat in this beef is almost orange. Even if there was marginal benefit id still choose grass fed and wouldnt shy away from the fat.

im not opposed to eating large quantities of fat but find most guests prefer not to chew on big chunks of it. better to disperse it through the meat and gravy than have large chunks left on plates.
 

foodguy

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i did a standing rib roast for christmas dinner (blade end, three-rib). Seasoned it the day before (salt, pepper, little allspice and clove), air-dried for a couple of hours, brought to close to room temp for a couple of hours before roasting. Roasted at 200 degrees to about 125. removed from the oven and kept warm until amost ready to serve. After pulling the gougeres, jacked the oven to 550, put the eroast back in for 15 minutes to crisp and brown. have to say it was one of the best pieces of beef i've ever had.
 

oldseed

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i have slow roasted prime rib for years, and everyone who's ever tried mine has loved it.

i don't buy into rubs, adding garlic, etc. etc. i'm sure those are good ideas, but a properly slow roasted prime rib needs no seasoning before it's done. i don't like to risk the salt drying up my meat. slow roasting a rib is ALL about the temperature and little to nothing about how it's spiced.

instructions:

1. bring roast to room temperature. this will take hours. i can't stress how important this is. this is the step everybody skips, and the penalty you pay is huge.

2. put roast on rack, fat side up. preheat oven to 200, 225 or 250.

3. roast about 20 mins (250) to 40 mins (200) a pound.

you'll know it's done when the outside is all browned up and looks awesome. hard to describe but you know it when you see it. you don't need no stink'n meat thermometer.

make sure you rest that meat. 20 minutes to 30 minutes is good.

when it comes out most of he inside will be medium to medium rare. the edges will be medium-well done. this is good for a group as different people like different cuts.

when it comes out, that's when you salt it. salt and pepper liberally the outside. then serve. give everyone a salt and pepper shaker so they can season it as the like it.

serve w/ au jus.

works every time.
 

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