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Site Topics - Part II

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by j, Feb 4, 2010.

  1. rach2jlc

    rach2jlc Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I just thought that with the recent poetic posts you have made, coupled with the reference to Conne in the aforementioned user's initial post, that you may have given puppetry of teh socks a try. I also remember a post saying you couldnt do a sock puppet, and i agreed claiming you were too smart, so i thought you might try one that was dumbed down. Just a thought.'
    I think I'd write limericks, were I to try. Something like: There once was a Willy from Dallas, Who cruised boys out in front of the Palace He found him one nice, And smashed it but thrice, Then sang liturgy songs by T. Tallis.
     
  2. CDFS

    CDFS Senior member

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    ^Very believable low brow 'poetry'. Excellent.
     
  3. JustinW

    JustinW Senior member

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    Neighbour is Canadian/British, whereas neighbor is American. Other examples of words like that would be labour (Canadian/British) vs. labor (American) and colour (Canadian/British) vs. color (American).

    edit: lawyerdad beat me to it


    Is there a more correct/precise term for the two versions of English?

    I was taught 'English' at prep school and told never to write in 'American'. Then, at Uni, we were taught to avoid 'Americanisms' in favour of Commonwealth English. Of course, Canada is in North America and doesn't write in 'American'. Fiji and Mozambique are both members of the Commonwealth, yet writes 'American' when writing in English.
     
  4. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    Is there a more correct/precise term for the two versions of English?

    I was taught 'English' at prep school and told never to write in 'American'. Then, at Uni, we were taught to avoid 'Americanisms' in favour of Commonwealth English. Of course, Canada is in North America and doesn't write in 'American'. Fiji and Mozambique are both members of the Commonwealth, yet writes 'American' when writing in English.


    I refer to the two as, "The Queen's English," and " 'Murican."
     
  5. Incman

    Incman Senior member

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    Is there a more correct/precise term for the two versions of English?

    I was taught 'English' at prep school and told never to write in 'American'. Then, at Uni, we were taught to avoid 'Americanisms' in favour of Commonwealth English. Of course, Canada is in North America and doesn't write in 'American'. Fiji and Mozambique are both members of the Commonwealth, yet writes 'American' when writing in English.


    To be honest with you, I have absolutely no idea. Language is not my strong suit. Perhaps one of the more knowledgeable members could chime in.
     
  6. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Senior member

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    Thank you very much. I find that English English -- British English sounds much better than American English. Very classy. [​IMG] [​IMG]

    You probably know this, but just in case: (1) the different spellings don't imply different pronunciation; and (2) "British English" and "American English" are both very broad terms -- there are variants of British English that likely would not strike you as classy.
     
  7. Incman

    Incman Senior member

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    You probably know this, but just in case: (1) the different spellings don't imply different pronunciation; and (2) "British English" and "American English" are both very broad terms -- there are variants of British English that likely would not strike you as classy.
    Quiet, you chav. [​IMG] edit 2: this comment was meant entirely in jest, just in case the laugh didn't give it away.
     
  8. Thomas

    Thomas Senior member

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    WHOA: this just happened -

    I had finished typing a post and hit sumbit reply. A minute later, my brower times out. arg. I hit 'back' and re-submit my eloquent prose. A warning box comes up: This is a Duplicate Post...

    This is way cool. Is this a new feature?
     
  9. edmorel

    edmorel Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    WHOA: this just happened -

    I had finished typing a post and hit sumbit reply. A minute later, my brower times out. arg. I hit 'back' and re-submit my eloquent prose. A warning box comes up: This is a Duplicate Post...

    This is way cool. Is this a new feature?


    No. You are not a special flower. Has happened to me often. Whenever it does, I open another window to SF and see if the poast was posted. Most times, it has posted.
     
  10. Thomas

    Thomas Senior member

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    No. You are not a special flower. Has happened to me often. Whenever it does, I open another window to SF and see if the poast was posted. Most times, it has posted.

    Well, some of us aren't sufficiently big-time to afford second windows!

    And - more to the point - I'd seen enough duplicate posts in the past (from other posters) to indicate that this wasn't always the case.
     
  11. edmorel

    edmorel Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Well, some of us aren't sufficiently big-time to afford second windows!


    I am King Kong!!!!
     
  12. Thomas

    Thomas Senior member

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    I am King Kong!!!!

    I saw the dictures. No need to rub it in.
     
  13. why

    why Senior member

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    'Commonwealth English' is known as Received Pronunciation (usually stated as RP), while 'American English' is commonly referred to as General American (GA). Americanisms are not really part of RP or GA since they're usually morphological.

    The loss of 'u' in American dipthongs (neighbour, colour, armour, valour, candour, etc.) is partly due to Webster and others who felt America should have a distinct and official language. Some leaders of young America played with the idea as well (there's a document attributed to John Adams where he tries to argue the necessity of an official language) but these ideas obviously never got very far.
     
  14. Teacher

    Teacher Senior member

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    'Commonwealth English' is known as Received Pronunciation (usually stated as RP), while 'American English' is commonly referred to as General American (GA). Americanisms are not really part of RP or GA since they're usually morphological.

    No, RP is a very specific accent that is basically unused nowadays. Even the Queen had partially drifted away from it. It arose centuries ago from monarchs being tired of not being able to understand those who held court with them from other parts of England. It has nothing whatsoever to do with diction, spelling, grammar, etc...accent only. "Commonwealth English" is a broad term defining shared characteristics among the Commonwealth nations, particulary spelling, and pertaining less to accent, since the Commonwealth nations display different de facto standard accents.

    Sort of, although these aren't dipthongs, they're diagraphs. Dipthong is a phonetic/phonological term referring to two vowels coalescing and forming the nucleus of a single syllable; diagraph is the use of two letter characters for one sound (like 'th').

    Some people, most notably Ben Franklin*, argued for different spellings for patriotic reasons, but Webster's reason was purely practical. He noted that the '-re' spelling of words made sense in French, but due to the pronunciation changes when English borrowed these words the spelling didn't make sense in English. The same more or less goes for most of his reforms, many of which never caught on ('iz' for 'is,' for example).

    Intensely interested in language, he was one of the main proponents of (a.) widespread and free education, and (b.) standardization. The main speller being used in the late eighteenth century was Dilworth's speller (don't remember the title), which was unabashedly Torry and consisted of moralistic parables. Webster wanted children to think a little more critically, which caused him to self-publish his "blue-backed speller." This began outselling Dilworth and was, I've argued in research I did years ago, the most influential item in the solidification of American spelling. His dictionary is thought by many as his most influential work, but there's evidence that his spellings were taking hold among the young workforce in cities before the dictionary even appeared.

    *Ben Franklin even invented his own alphabet and used it in letters to friends for several years but finally gave up.
     
  15. why

    why Senior member

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    No, RP is a very specific accent that is basically unused nowadays. Even the Queen had partially drifted away from it. It arose centuries ago from monarchs being tired of not being able to understand those who held court with them from other parts of England. It has nothing whatsoever to do with diction, spelling, grammar, etc...accent only. "Commonwealth English" is a broad term defining shared characteristics among the Commonwealth nations, particulary spelling, and pertaining less to accent, since the Commonwealth nations display different de facto standard accents.

    I didn't say it had anything to do with 'diction, spelling, grammar, etc.' I said the opposite, in fact. RP is not 'basically unused'. It is the standard accent taught to non-native English speakers. Hell, it's even called 'BBC English' (cf. 'Walter Cronkite English' in America as an offshoot).

    Sort of, although these aren't dipthongs, they're diagraphs. Dipthong is a phonetic/phonological term referring to two vowels coalescing and forming the nucleus of a single syllable; diagraph is the use of two letter characters for one sound (like 'th').

    They're digraphs now (generally, at least in RP and GA especially when followed by rhotics). Some words in some dialects have smoothed out the dipthongs to single vowel sounds without changing the spelling (e.g. 'about' in parts of Canada). Most English speakers, oddly enough, preserve some falling dipthongs while most others were smoothed to a single vowel.

    Edit: Not really a reply specifically to you...
     
  16. Teacher

    Teacher Senior member

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    I didn't say it had anything to do with 'diction, spelling, grammar, etc.' I said the opposite, in fact. RP is not 'basically unused'. It is the standard accent taught to non-native English speakers. Hell, it's even called 'BBC English' (cf. 'Walter Cronkite English' in America as an offshoot).

    No, BBC English is not RP. They're derived from different accents. RP is is more Kentish, while BBC English -- the more modern of the two -- is derived from the "University English" of the area surrounding London (Oxford, Cambridge, etc.) As for diction, spelling and grammar, I'll repeat: you equated Commonwealth English -- which IS mostly about diction and spelling -- and RP, and they are not the same thing.


    The Canadian example you quote is still a dipthong; it is pronounced by most Anglo Canadians as /Λu/, roughly. But the previous words you were talking about were never dipthongs in English, only French. The diagraphs were used simply to show French origin (as opposed to words from Latin, like governor, which have rarely been spelled '-our'), not English pronunciation.
     
  17. edinatlanta

    edinatlanta Senior member

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    After Franny's latest outburst in CE, can we just get rid of him once and for all (forum wise)?

    Edit: is the "don't make requests for banning" rule in place for this Trans Mod threak or just the old one?
     
  18. unjung

    unjung Senior member

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    After Franny's latest outburst in CE, can we just get rid of him once and for all (forum wise)?

    Link?
     
  19. edinatlanta

    edinatlanta Senior member

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    From the RIP Murtha threak:

    Good riddance. A true piece of shit.
     
  20. MrG

    MrG Senior member

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    From the RIP Murtha threak:

    It was a nasty thing to say, and I'm disappointed AF felt the need to say it, rather than remain silent. I think AF is a nice guy (and I've met him IRL), but it's unfortunate to me that he made that statement. That said, I thought Fuuma made a really good point later in the thread, and I think it's a fair argument against penalizing AF. Moreover, I don't see how not sharing the popular reverence for the dead should be a bannable offense.
     

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