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Single needle tailoring vs. double needle tailorin

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Pink22m, Aug 31, 2003.

  1. Pink22m

    Pink22m Senior member

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    I always thought that single needle tailoring was superior to double needle tailoring, but I was told by a coworker that double needle is superior. According to her, double needle tailoring produces twice the amount of stitchwork, thus making the shirt more durable because the stitchin is better reinforced...someone please clarify this for me.
     
  2. A Harris

    A Harris Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Single-needle shirt seams are sewn twice - once up and once down the seam. So that argument is bogus.
     
  3. Pink22m

    Pink22m Senior member

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    Ok, so how does this differ from double needle stitching? I know double needle uses two different needles...
     
  4. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Twin needle employs a chain stitch, single needle a lock stitch (conventional top and bobbin thread). Look at the diagrams here: http://home.howstuffworks.com/sewing-machine.htm Have a look at the inside leg seam of a pair of Levis. That is a twin needle seam. Both fabric edges are folded over and then a twin needle machine, utilizing a chain stitch goes over the lot. Do you feel the roughness of the underside? That is where the thread forms a loop. A single needle seam is equally stitched twice but with a flat felled seam. One row of stitching is hidden inside the fabric. From the topside you see only one row, but you see two rows of stitching from the underside. http://www.backpacking.net/makegear/...latfelled.html Twin needle seams are less labor intesive, but more prone to puckering. Most American shirts are single, most European ones, bar the top makes, are twin needle. Have a look at a Charvet shirt to see single needle at it's finest.
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. HitMan009

    HitMan009 Senior member

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    Pink22m,

    As the everyone has mention, single needle tailoring is the superior of the two. If you go to any department stores, you can check out any shirt there and it will be pretty much double needle tailoring. Only Polo Ralph Lauren seems to use single needle tailoring in terms of the mass marketed shirts(basically shirts under $100). Single needle tailoring creates a more refined, smooth seam that doesn't pucker like with double needle tailoring.
     
  6. mbc

    mbc Senior member

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    I was in Macy's the other day and noticed that Alfani has a new "fitted" dress shirt line which advertises, among other things, single needle tailoring. I am planning to pick one up today to see how fitted it really is.
     
  7. Pink22m

    Pink22m Senior member

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    Thanks guys for the information; I especially found those links to stiching guides very informative. I am going to go share this with my friend who insisted that double needle tailoring was the superior method of the two.
     
  8. Mike C.

    Mike C. Senior member

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    Bengal; great post. Now for the first time since joining this forum I understand the differences between stitching, though this topic has been discussed to great lengths before.
     
  9. naturlaut

    naturlaut Senior member

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    Aside from the durability of single-needle stitch --- which is always done by a single-needle machine (from Charvet to Borrelli), a clean stitch gives a smooth finish and does not rub against your skin --- even after repeated laundering.  This side seam is the only seam that is done by machine on all the 'handmade' shirts.  Some, like Brioni sports shirts, uses two rows of stitching (by machine), but would start to look bad after some washing and pressing.
     
  10. mbc

    mbc Senior member

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    As an update, I purchased one of the "Alfani" fitted dress shirts from Macy's. It does indeed have single needle tailoring, and while the quality is obviously less than perfect (for a $29.99 RTW shirt, what can you expect), but it fits very nicely.. a little short to tuck in, but goes great untucked with some nice jeans for a night out.
     

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