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Silk v. Knit Scarves - Warmth?

luftvier

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Scarves are a cold-weather necessity to keep out biting wind. I've always worn bulky wool or wool blend scarves, operating under the impression that the sheer bulk of the wool would keep the warmth in and the wind out. They are rarely elegant, though.

I've admired a lot of silk scarves in the WAYWYN thread, but always from afar, as I am afraid they they're sacrificing function for form. And while I'd purchase one to try out, they're pricey compared to wool.

For those of you who own both - are silk scarves relatively warm for serious winter wear, compared with the bulkier, less-elegant wool?

Your expertise is greatly appreciated.
 

JayJay

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Originally Posted by luftvier
Scarves are a cold-weather necessity to keep out biting wind. I've always worn bulky wool or wool blend scarves, operating under the impression that the sheer bulk of the wool would keep the warmth in and the wind out. They are rarely elegant, though.

I've admired a lot of silk scarves in the WAYWYN thread, but always from afar, as I am afraid they they're sacrificing function for form. And while I'd purchase one to try out, they're pricey compared to wool.

For those of you who own both - are silk scarves relatively warm for serious winter wear, compared with the bulkier, less-elegant wool?

Your expertise is greatly appreciated.

Are you including cashmere in your assessment of wool? I have light-weight and heavy cashmere that are both terrific this time of year.
 

Sam Hober

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Originally Posted by luftvier
Scarves are a cold-weather necessity to keep out biting wind. I've always worn bulky wool or wool blend scarves, operating under the impression that the sheer bulk of the wool would keep the warmth in and the wind out. They are rarely elegant, though. I've admired a lot of silk scarves in the WAYWYN thread, but always from afar, as I am afraid they they're sacrificing function for form. And while I'd purchase one to try out, they're pricey compared to wool. For those of you who own both - are silk scarves relatively warm for serious winter wear, compared with the bulkier, less-elegant wool? Your expertise is greatly appreciated.
Luftvier, Your question is a very good one and you will find different answers. I used to live in Denver and they have some nice blizzards so I understand your point. I wore a scarf which was a double layer of Thai silk which worked very well for me. By doubling the scarf I found myself warm at all times. Doubling meant 4 layers of silk as the silk was already double layered. I never felt the need for an interlining but I wonder if in Canada near the great lakes where the weather is wet and cold it might be a good idea? In summary I think that in terms of weight, looks and comfort silk scarves are more better.
 

luftvier

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Originally Posted by JayJay
Are you including cashmere in your assessment of wool? I have light-weight and heavy cashmere that are both terrific this time of year.
I had not factored cashmere in at all.
 

fcuknu

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Surpisingly, silk does a very good job insulating. I wouldn't go out in sub zero weather in silk, but it can do the job. Its hard to beat cashmere though. Oh hey, whats that down in my signature?
 

Tomasso

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I like cashmere backed silk scarves.


11592-18--hermes-royal-blue-cashmere-blend-silk-equestrian-print-scarf1.jpg
 

globetrotter

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I have a cashmere backed silk scarf. I am now planning on making a scarf with 3 layers - silk on one side and cashmere on the other, with an inner layer of alpaca. that will be hugely warm.
 

FIHTies

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Originally Posted by globetrotter
I have a cashmere backed silk scarf. I am now planning on making a scarf with 3 layers - silk on one side and cashmere on the other, with an inner layer of alpaca. that will be hugely warm.

Seven fold scarves anyone?
 

Taxler

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Originally Posted by FIHTies
Seven fold scarves anyone?

Loro Piana sells a scarf with 5 different colored panels stitched together along one of the long edges. You choose the inside and outside color you want and squeeze the other 3 inside. It was too complicated for me and way to chunky, but it is an interesting idea if you only want to own 1 scarf.
 

QuarantaLocatel

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We have this gap... We love to produce silk scarves for winter too...but people don't imagine, generally, how silki is good in insulating from the cold when you can fold it just a bit.
 

QuarantaLocatel

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I don't like cold months, but since I discovered silk scarves I use them instead than wool or cachemere most of time.
They are really light but they protect from cold and we generally don't imagine it. Of course there are textiles mixded silk-cachemere, but even just silk is insulating.

 

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