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cb200

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There been some PR stuff about bio-degradable synthetics from Primaloft over the last two years that they were pushing saying that microbes would easily digest their new Bio insulation. I think that's a hard sell in the market. As much as people want to have nice eco materials, telling them it's a biodegradable synthetic sounds like it'll fall apart. Interesting though harnessing microbes to help at the end of the lifecycle of a garment.
 

King Calder

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Interested in following this thread, though I doubt I'll have much to add. My suspicion is that there may be more innovation going on in the techwear/outdoors space, not necessarily fashion? That said, I have no idea whether a brand like Vollebak is doing something genuinely new/innovative or is just a lot of marketing hype: https://www.vollebak.com/product/indestructible-puffer/
 

snow

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Interested in following this thread, though I doubt I'll have much to add. My suspicion is that there may be more innovation going on in the techwear/outdoors space, not necessarily fashion? That said, I have no idea whether a brand like Vollebak is doing something genuinely new/innovative or is just a lot of marketing hype: https://www.vollebak.com/product/indestructible-puffer/
It's just hype. The only reason to make a jacket (or almost anything) out of dyneema is that it's strong for its weight. If you make a jacket out of dyneema but then use 600+ fill power down (this is what you get in a uniqlo puffy) and make it weigh 2.5kg (this is insanely heavy) you are just spending money to spend money.
 

Symphony

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i think the problem can be summed up very simply by saying that menswear is just really boring compared to what is happening in womenswear.
At the same time, I think a lot of it is also the fact that menswear has better quality products, but nothing particularly interesting/hasn't been done before. I think a lot of menswear designers tend to design garments with a moderate degree of wearability in mind.

Meanwhile, womenswear tends to play with silhouettes and has more interesting stuff all around, however, I think the quality of clothing is usually pretty subpar.
 

cb200

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I think Vollebak has been innovate and likely taken some materials up in an attempt to be first to market. They are definitely working a materials first design ethos with a design and concept pulled down from a bill of materials that may not make ultimate practical sense. Their marketing and copy is famously a bit over the top, but seems to fit for their brand world building. Not for me but hope they have an audience.

Materials wise the outdoors ingredients brands seem to be putting allot of effort in sustainability and eco initiates with a side trip to anti viral properties.

Textile insight is a good place to get a peak at what's being rolled out and the general direction of textiles.
 

FlyingMonkey

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Just wanted to give this thread a bump for the new year, because I think it's important... and in case there are folks out there who haven't seen it and want to contribute.
 

armellod.e

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Have you already read about CFCL? Not too excited by the mens' looks for this season (jackets and bags are nice though) but I think the brand has a lot going for it. I think Yusuke Takahashi has a pretty distinct vision and it's cool to see it working with new technology and materials
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Theriaca (Asuka Hamada) is also producing amazing knitwear designs. She has a nice YouTube channel too (Asuka Creative Studio)
 

cb200

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This is newish model... On running has a shoe subscription service. Circular models and experiments seem to be pushing forward and I've heard of a major brand gearing up for a buyback experiment. The reverse logistics / sustainable implementation and consumer acceptance of returning or not owning a product seems like challenges outside of the technical aspect of disassembly.

 

imatlas

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This is newish model... On running has a shoe subscription service. Circular models and experiments seem to be pushing forward and I've heard of a major brand gearing up for a buyback experiment. The reverse logistics / sustainable implementation and consumer acceptance of returning or not owning a product seems like challenges outside of the technical aspect of disassembly.

Patagonia has been innovating on this front for a while now, but they’re helped by having a customer base that is probably a bit more environmentally concerned than the average.

Runners may have somewhat similar demographics as “outdoor types” in general so that may be another market that’s ready for such an experiment.
 

FlyingMonkey

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This is newish model... On running has a shoe subscription service. Circular models and experiments seem to be pushing forward and I've heard of a major brand gearing up for a buyback experiment. The reverse logistics / sustainable implementation and consumer acceptance of returning or not owning a product seems like challenges outside of the technical aspect of disassembly.

Yes, and they aren't the only one - several start-ups doing this, including Hylo in the UK. Based on circular economy principles.

I should add - I've already signed up for Cyclon - they aim to start producing in Fall 2021, but it won't happen at all unless they get a certain number of pre-registrations.

I've also already bought a pair of Reebok's Forever Floatride GROW running shoes, which are exactly the same as the Reebok Floatride Energy shoes that I already run in but much more sustainable (not 100%, but getting there). I get through quite a few running shoes so I'm particularly concerned to help the industry move towards a circular economic model.
 
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cb200

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Patagonia has been innovating on this front for a while now, but they’re helped by having a customer base that is probably a bit more environmentally concerned than the average.
I think Patagonia's focus on behavioral and expectations for their customers (buy less, we'll fix it if it breaks, and sell obviously repaired things) is probably their biggest win. Still wish they would make a run a re-shoring actual production... but then they wouldn't have the margins to do the cool stuff they do... I know on their input side they are of a scale that they can lean on their supply chain to improve and can improve things for everyone.

@FlyingMonkey


Salomon released a shoe designed for recycling as well the other day. I actually like the look of it... Footwear and running seems to be a good place to leverage acceptance of things having a practical lifespan and taking care of end of product life while remaining technically advance and with performance characteristics.

.
 

FlyingMonkey

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@FlyingMonkey


Salomon released a shoe designed for recycling as well the other day. I actually like the look of it... Footwear and running seems to be a good place to leverage acceptance of things having a practical lifespan and taking care of end of product life while remaining technically advance and with performance characteristics.

.
Mentioned on the previous page!
 

FlyingMonkey

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The turn to limited ownership clothing is interesting. Some people seem to react against this and think it means that the items aren't 'yours'. But this isn't a deal where someone can come into your house and borrow your shoes without your permission. It's the recognition that clothing has a life-cycle, and your use of it isn't either the beginning or the end. It's particularly when we've accepted second-hand has being a thing for a long time, so what's so weird about 'subscription' models that recycle the materials from clothes or shoes into something new when you've finished with them?

This is especially with things like running shoes which have such a limited useful lifespan anyway. The really big questions remaining around this are the transaction costs and particularly the energy and resources (especially water) involved in recycling or remaking, but I very much doubt these will approach the enegy and water costs of say, growing new cotton, which are absurdly large.

But if we combine this with grown and biodegradeable / compostable subsitutes for synthetics (like the mushroom-based material mentioned above), we might actually be getting somewhere in terms of making clothing sustainable. And who cares if your fungus-grown, recyclable / biodegradeable running shoes only last 6 months* if that was the time your running shoe was going to last anyway when it was still made out of petroeum-derived, non-recyclable, non-biodegradeable plastics?

*Talking about actually running in running shoes here; if worn just for walking around / style purposes, I'm sure in either case, these shoes last a lot longer.
 

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