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Should the price of a bespoke suit go up if you keep on requesting more alterations?

tonylumpkin

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Only if there is a significant change in your measurements, which occurs during the time the suit is being constructed.
 

Shirtmaven

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The first suit is always a bit of Trial and error.

assuming that both tailor and customer have communicated what they can do, and what is expected.

As a customer, you cant ask a tailor who makes a traditional garment to make a drape suit.

As the fitting process goes on, if the tailor is off, or wrong, then it is his responsibility.
If you ask for 3" lapels and you get 3 1/2" then the tailor needs to absorb the cost.
but if you get 3 1/2" and decide you wanted narrow lapels but did not express this, then the tailor has the right to charge for this sort of change.

This is the same as a building contractor. change work orders can become expensive.

NOw, there are some customers who will never be happy.
take in a little here. let out a little there shorten this 1/4" angle that a tiny bit more.

In this case the tailor will never win, and the customer will never be happy.
You would be amazed at how many times the tailors will agree to minor changes. send the customer out, and not do a thing to the garment.
 

Don Carlos

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Originally Posted by Shirtmaven
The first suit is always a bit of Trial and error.

assuming that both tailor and customer have communicated what they can do, and what is expected.

As a customer, you cant ask a tailor who makes a traditional garment to make a drape suit.

As the fitting process goes on, if the tailor is off, or wrong, then it is his responsibility.
If you ask for 3" lapels and you get 3 1/2" then the tailor needs to absorb the cost.
but if you get 3 1/2" and decide you wanted narrow lapels but did not express this, then the tailor has the right to charge for this sort of change.

This is the same as a building contractor. change work orders can become expensive.

NOw, there are some customers who will never be happy.
take in a little here. let out a little there shorten this 1/4" angle that a tiny bit more.

In this case the tailor will never win, and the customer will never be happy.
You would be amazed at how many times the tailors will agree to minor changes. send the customer out, and not do a thing to the garment.


/thread
 

dragon8

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Originally Posted by tonylumpkin
Only if there is a significant change in your measurements, which occurs during the time the suit is being constructed.

This is probably the only time. But I would have to imagine it would be difficult to gain/lose that much weight in such a short time.
 

Doc4

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At the start, you and the tailor agree upon the end result both of suit and of price. If during the process you change the desired end result (ooh, I'd like a ticket pocket too!) the tailor is entitled to change the price to reflect that change.

Originally Posted by merkur
On the flip side, if by some miracle it only takes one or two fittings to get the fit and cut right, should you still expect to pay the same agreed upon price even though you didn't get or need the extra fittings/tailor time?

Of course. You are paying for the end result, not the process.
Originally Posted by Arrogant Bastard
/thread

+1
 

sartorial_marxist

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are you intending to show this to your tailor if the results are positive?
 

F. Corbera

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The cost of a bespoke suit should go up incrementally with each new order, like gasoline or school tuition.
 

RSS

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Absolutely not. If however if your requests for alterations become ridiculously absurd ... the tailor has every right to refuse your future orders.
 

celeste_pista

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the tailor needs to get it right...bottom line. if that takes longer than expected it should be on his t/dime...if he does get it right (even after a # of tries) you should respect that (whether skill on the first try or persistence on a number of tries) and give him some future business, however small. at the end of the day, though, each fitting takes up your time too and so the tailors who know their shit are worth finding...
 

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