Shotgun recommendations/secondhand issues.

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by durstgt, Mar 3, 2011.

  1. BP348

    BP348 Senior member

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    You guys are right about the Ruger red label but I've heard that most people either love 'em or hate 'em.
     


  2. andrew96

    andrew96 Senior member

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    One word number is all you need to hear:

    870

    [​IMG]
     


  3. Kyoung05

    Kyoung05 Senior member

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    One word number is all you need to hear:

    870

    [​IMG]


    Normally, this is what I'd recommend too. However, the OP said the gun would be primarily used for trap/skeet. IMO, learning to play either of those games with a pump gun is tough - the 870 is much longer than an O/U with a comparable length barrel, and thus, tougher to swing. Additionally, unless he'd devoted a lot of time to practicing with the 870, shooting doubles is going to be difficult. If he said he wanted just an all-around shotgun for field, clay sports, home defense, etc., I'd recommend the 870 in a heartbeat (and hell, if he had said his budget was $300 or so, I'd recommend it here). However, given that the OP appears to have a $1k budget, and is primarily interested in trap/skeet, I don't think the 870 is the best option. That said, I've heard good things about SKB O/U's.
     


  4. crazyquik

    crazyquik Senior member

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    A lot of 'not-so-great' information in this thread [​IMG] Trap and skeet are very different games; different enough that you really need shotguns that are choked differently (or, have interchangeable choke tubes). Luckily, most new guns have interchangeable choke tubes. I hate to be "that guy," but I would recommend a sporting clays grade/version semi-auto to begin with; a Beretta 391, a Remington 11-87, or comparable. These are flexible, target grade shotguns that can be used for a variety of purposes. Generally, a semi-auto will be cheaper than an O/U. This means you can get closer to a 'top of the line' semi-auto for your budget. The gas gun will also have less felt recoil than the breakaction. Also, while pheasant hunting, a semi will give you 3 shots while an O/U will give you 2 (granted, the O/U will allow you to have a tighter choke for the second shot). With that said, and moving to O/Us, Huntsman has good advice. A Red Label (particularly used) is right in your price range. You can also get a field grade (and, occasionally) a target grade Browning Citori in your price range (if you shop on gun boards, as opposed to brick & mortar stores). Hell, if you search long and hard you can get an old Browning Superposed in your price range, although it will have fixed chokes (most likely) and thus be an inferior choice for your three disciplines of trap, skeet, and pheasants. I have heard great things about Yildiz, but if it's new it will lose value. A quality O/U will outlast all but the most high-volume target shooters (the top 1-2% of owners (those who measure their shooting in cases instead of boxes and buy shot by the ton). If you buy a used Ruger or Browning stackbarrel, and you don't like it, you'll be able to sell it for roughly what you paid for it (maybe more if you really shopped around the first time). If you buy a new O/U, it will undoubtedly decline in value.
     


  5. andrew96

    andrew96 Senior member

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    Normally, this is what I'd recommend too. However, the OP said the gun would be primarily used for trap/skeet. IMO, learning to play either of those games with a pump gun is tough - the 870 is much longer than an O/U with a comparable length barrel, and thus, tougher to swing. Additionally, unless he'd devoted a lot of time to practicing with the 870, shooting doubles is going to be difficult. If he said he wanted just an all-around shotgun for field, clay sports, home defense, etc., I'd recommend the 870 in a heartbeat (and hell, if he had said his budget was $300 or so, I'd recommend it here). However, given that the OP appears to have a $1k budget, and is primarily interested in trap/skeet, I don't think the 870 is the best option. That said, I've heard good things about SKB O/U's.



    Fair enough, however unless the OP is wealthy and money is no option then the 870 could still save him a lot of money. I learned on an 870 and had no trouble. I'd rather have the $700 and a nice shotgun than a slightly more fitting shotgun(considering the job at hand) and $700 fewer dollars.
     


  6. Huntsman

    Huntsman Senior member

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    Normally, this is what I'd recommend too. However, the OP said the gun would be primarily used for trap/skeet. IMO, learning to play either of those games with a pump gun is tough - the 870 is much longer than an O/U with a comparable length barrel, and thus, tougher to swing. Additionally, unless he'd devoted a lot of time to practicing with the 870, shooting doubles is going to be difficult. If he said he wanted just an all-around shotgun for field, clay sports, home defense, etc., I'd recommend the 870 in a heartbeat (and hell, if he had said his budget was $300 or so, I'd recommend it here). However, given that the OP appears to have a $1k budget, and is primarily interested in trap/skeet, I don't think the 870 is the best option. That said, I've heard good things about SKB O/U's.
    For trap, at least, the longer action (and hence, longer OAL) is not as much of a big deal as it would be in Skeet, and a little bit in Sporting. People shoot with some LONG barrels in Trap. But, then again, an 870's action is not really longer than an 11-87 or 1100, and those Semis are used heavily in all disciplines. That said, I still wouldn't recommend an 870 (as much as I respect them), as they are a little less wieldy for Doubles trap or Sporting Clays, and hunting, too, but it's less of an issue there. An 870 has some points for versatility (defense, option to put a slug barrel on for deer, turkey barrel, etc) but they seem to be beyond the OP's scope.
    A lot of 'not-so-great' information in this thread [​IMG] Trap and skeet are very different games; different enough that you really need shotguns that are choked differently (or, have interchangeable choke tubes). Luckily, most new guns have interchangeable choke tubes. I hate to be "that guy," but I would recommend a sporting clays grade/version semi-auto to begin with; a Beretta 391, a Remington 11-87, or comparable. These are flexible, target grade shotguns that can be used for a variety of purposes. Generally, a semi-auto will be cheaper than an O/U. This means you can get closer to a 'top of the line' semi-auto for your budget. The gas gun will also have less felt recoil than the breakaction. Also, while pheasant hunting, a semi will give you 3 shots while an O/U will give you 2 (granted, the O/U will allow you to have a tighter choke for the second shot). With that said, and moving to O/Us, Huntsman has good advice. A Red Label (particularly used) is right in your price range. You can also get a field grade (and, occasionally) a target grade Browning Citori in your price range (if you shop on gun boards, as opposed to brick & mortar stores). Hell, if you search long and hard you can get an old Browning Superposed in your price range, although it will have fixed chokes (most likely) and thus be an inferior choice for your three disciplines of trap, skeet, and pheasants. I have heard great things about Yildiz, but if it's new it will lose value. A quality O/U will outlast all but the most high-volume target shooters (the top 1-2% of owners (those who measure their shooting in cases instead of boxes and buy shot by the ton). If you buy a used Ruger or Browning stackbarrel, and you don't like it, you'll be able to sell it for roughly what you paid for it (maybe more if you really shopped around the first time). If you buy a new O/U, it will undoubtedly decline in value.
    Indeed. I thought of a number of great guns that would fit the bill except they don't have interchangeable chokes (say, the Miroku manufactured Charles Daly O/Us), but didn't think to mention how important that would be. You can survive for all those games with a Mod, but you'll be a little hamstrung at times in ways you shouldn't have to be. So yes, OP, make sure you have interchangeable chokes! I prefer an O/U because I like them, but I started with a Semi to knock down the recoil when I was younger. My father shot out a Remington 1100, (40k+ rounds, he thinks) and while Remington was refitting it, got an 11-87, which he put another 20k through. They are both excellent choices. They bring lowered felt recoil, and extra capacity to the table in ways an O/U can't match. ~ H
     


  7. Crane's

    Crane's Senior member

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    I'm really surprised that the Benelli Montefeltro hasn't been mentioned. It's right in the price range of the OP, can handle 2 3/4 or 3 inch shells, has interchangeable choke tubes, nice wood and the inertia drive system makes it one of the quickest and least recoiling semi autos out there.
     


  8. Shikar

    Shikar Senior member

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    I cant believe I missed this thread JustinW!!!

    For 1K you should get a Beretta 391 or newer a400 which is lighter and easier to clean, or Xtrema2 if you duck hunt. Most low cost O/U recoil like crazy since they are light and are not built to take tens of thousands of shells. This is esp true in case you need to shoot a lot at the clays range. As someone mentioned earlier, I am the sort that buys shells by the case, heck I am running low on 12 ga shells as I am down below 50 cases at home.... The finishing on a below $1.5k OU is just below par but if you plan to shoot less than 1-2k shells a year you should be ok.
    The auto will have 5 chokes, can take light loads to monster loads, shims for cast/drop adjustment to fit you better, and generally easily available multiple recoil pad thickness for LOP changes depending on winter clothing or summer.
    Joel Etchen is the place to get a new Beretta.
    Benelli is good for auto too and Browning makes decent O/Us.
    Do not get a 20ga, please only look at 12ga as its a lot more versatile.

    Regards.
     


  9. Geezer

    Geezer Senior member

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    A lot of 'not-so-great' information in this thread [​IMG]

    Trap and skeet are very different games; different enough that you really need shotguns that are choked differently (or, have interchangeable choke tubes). Luckily, most new guns have interchangeable choke tubes.

    I hate to be "that guy," but I would recommend a sporting clays grade/version semi-auto to begin with; a Beretta 391, a Remington 11-87, or comparable. These are flexible, target grade shotguns that can be used for a variety of purposes. Generally, a semi-auto will be cheaper than an O/U. This means you can get closer to a 'top of the line' semi-auto for your budget. The gas gun will also have less felt recoil than the breakaction. Also, while pheasant hunting, a semi will give you 3 shots while an O/U will give you 2 (granted, the O/U will allow you to have a tighter choke for the second shot).

    With that said, and moving to O/Us, Huntsman has good advice. A Red Label (particularly used) is right in your price range. You can also get a field grade (and, occasionally) a target grade Browning Citori in your price range (if you shop on gun boards, as opposed to brick & mortar stores). Hell, if you search long and hard you can get an old Browning Superposed in your price range, although it will have fixed chokes (most likely) and thus be an inferior choice for your three disciplines of trap, skeet, and pheasants.

    I have heard great things about Yildiz, but if it's new it will lose value. A quality O/U will outlast all but the most high-volume target shooters (the top 1-2% of owners (those who measure their shooting in cases instead of boxes and buy shot by the ton). If you buy a used Ruger or Browning stackbarrel, and you don't like it, you'll be able to sell it for roughly what you paid for it (maybe more if you really shopped around the first time). If you buy a new O/U, it will undoubtedly decline in value.


    This is good advice. Except I'd recommend a sporting clays O/U. You'll fit in more with the typical trap and skeet crowd, and may later want to move on to sporting with it. Assuming you are a comparative novice, the manual of arms of an O/U (and associated issues like cleaning) are also simpler. And resale values stronger.

    Heresy perhaps, but for sporting use as opposed to social, an O/U or side by side is all you need. And I've owned or shot a bunch of slide actions and semi-autos oveer the years. The idea that you need a magazine-fed cannon for ducks is also a bit of rural myth. Most of the ducks I've shot have been with a S/S game gun using standard 2 3/4 inch 12 gauge loads. Only geese reallly need the heavy artillery.
     


  10. CrackBaby

    CrackBaby Well-Known Member

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    don't be a pussy with this O/U european bs. get a remington 870, or mossberg 590 and spend the extra money on cartridges and clays.

    you're welcome.
     


  11. andrew96

    andrew96 Senior member

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    don't be a pussy with this O/U european bs. get a remington 870, or mossberg 590 and spend the extra money on cartridges and clays.

    you're welcome.


    It might cause some problems to put a cartridge in a shotgun.
     


  12. CrackBaby

    CrackBaby Well-Known Member

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    It might cause some problems to put a cartridge in a shotgun.

    a shell is still a cartridge... nice try bro
     


  13. Dakota rube

    Dakota rube Senior member

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    Is the fucking moon out of whack or something?
     


  14. csoukoulis

    csoukoulis Senior member

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    One word number is all you need to hear:

    870

    [​IMG]


    Just make sure its not an 870 express
     


  15. csoukoulis

    csoukoulis Senior member

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    It might cause some problems to put a cartridge in a shotgun.

    If the powder and projectile are combined in one unit its a cartridge. Shotgun shell = cartridge.
     


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