Shoes With Character

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by bigbris1, Mar 28, 2008.

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  1. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    What is the approximate translation into English of "Haferlschuh" and what are the shoe's defining characteristics?
    There are two typical characteristics of the Haferl-Schuh:

    [​IMG]

    The raised and overhanging toe part, called: "˜Schiffchen' (little boat) and the raised heel.
    The shoe was designed for mountain-walking (not climbing), for example driving your cow herd
    to high-lying pastures. The toe was to prevent the foot becoming wedged while going downhill,
    while the raised heel gave support while going uphill.

    [​IMG]

    The entire shoe was modelled on the hoof of the chamois.

    [​IMG]

    http://www.haferl.com/

    The shoe became fashionable in the 1920s/30s. That's when English tourists coined
    the name: 'Haferl' comes from the English 'half shoe' (as opposed to boots).
    There is a pair of Haferl-shoes in the Offenburg Shoe-Museum,
    which was made for Marlene Dietrich while holidaying in the Salzburg region.

    Of course, what was once a utility shoe for mountain farmers and hunters
    has these days, become an accessory for beer festivals.
     


  2. dopey

    dopey Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    There are two typical characteristics of the Haferl-Schuh:

    [​IMG]

    The raised and overhanging toe part, called: "˜Schiffchen' (little boat) and the raised heel.
    The shoe was designed for mountain-walking (not climbing), for example driving your cow herd
    to high-lying pastures. The toe was to prevent the foot becoming wedged while going downhill,
    while the raised heel gave support while going uphill.

    [​IMG]

    The entire shoe was modelled on the hoof of the chamois.

    [​IMG]

    http://www.haferl.com/

    The shoe became fashionable in the 1920s/30s. That's when English tourists coined
    the name: 'Haferl' comes from the English 'half shoe' (as opposed to boots).
    There is a pair of Haferl-shoes in the Offenburg Shoe-Museum,
    which was made for Marlene Dietrich while holidaying in the Salzburg region.

    Of course, what was once a utility shoe for mountain farmers and hunters
    has these days, become an accessory for beer festivals.


    Thank you. The first example you posted is actually quite beautiful. I question whether anyone purchasing a pair today for its original purpose would still get a leather sole. Were the original ones hobnailed? What would be used today for a working pair?
     


  3. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    The first example you posted is actually quite beautiful. Were the original ones hobnailed?
    I agree, that pair is really beautiful.

    I try to remember those Marlene Dietrich shoes in the museum. I think you're right, they were hobnailed.

    That reminds me of a story: After the last war, my grandmother thought there would be another war soon and she needed a good pair of solid shoes. So, some local cobbler made for her the heaviest shoes mankind could think of, hobnailed, triple stitched, the works.

    As we know, there was no war and the shoes were never worn in anger. They weren't worn at all. Period. But she never threw them away and those shoe were with her, "˜til she died. As children, when visiting our grandmother, it gave my sister and me the greatest pleasure to play with the "˜war-shoes'.

    They do not make shoes like that anymore!

    Another thing that was wonderful to play with: our grandfather's collapsible top hat (chapeau claque). Such a beautiful: Whooosh!!!
     


  4. bigbris1

    bigbris1 Senior member

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    [​IMG]
    AE Dryden? [​IMG]
     


  5. fritzl

    fritzl Senior member

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    I question whether anyone purchasing a pair today for its original purpose would still get a leather sole. Were the original ones hobnailed?

    [​IMG]

    @dopey
    What would be used today for a working pair?


    Vibram

    The Italian Vitale Bramani survived a severe accident in the mountains in 1935 in which six of his companions died. Back then it was common to walk up to the beginning of the face of the mountain with heavy, nailed shoes, where the shoes would be exchanged for the ones used during the actual climbing. The shoes for climbing were lightweight ones featuring a wound sole made from hemp and a thin linen or leather shaft. These thin climbing shoes, however, were the group's doom when a thunderstorm emerged. Having gone through this cruel experience, Vitale Bramani went about developing a slip-proof and flexible sole for mountaineers made from natural rubber. He simply copied the pattern of the pitched nails common at the time in rubber and together with the tyre manufacturer Pirelli developed the first sole shapes. He named his company VIBRAMÂ[​IMG] and this first sole was given the name Roccia, which is still the name we use for our shoes today.
     


  6. bigbris1

    bigbris1 Senior member

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    Found these. The seller has them in different lengths.
     


  7. fritzl

    fritzl Senior member

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    Found these. The seller has them in different lengths.

    bb,

    these are not flush toe plates, though they are made by Triumph, the company who is producing any kind of metal heel and toe plates.

    I would contact the seller for advise. I am sure he can be helpful. Good luck [​IMG]
     


  8. grimslade

    grimslade Senior member

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    Fritzl, how do you walk with those heel plates without slip-sliding all over the place? I shudder to think of it.
     


  9. fritzl

    fritzl Senior member

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    Fritzl, how do you walk with those heel plates without slip-sliding all over the place? I shudder to think of it.

    No need to shudder [​IMG]

    I am used to. It is like riding a bicycle. As soon you "learned" it, you'll never forget.

    A short anecdote

    Recently I've been a bit tipsy and didn't take care properly. Rummms, and the band began to play [​IMG] The devil never sleeps
     


  10. khaki sack

    khaki sack Senior member

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    Recently I've been a bit tipsy and didn't take care properly. Rummms, and the band began to play [​IMG] The devil never sleeps

    Rock on ,brother. [​IMG]
     


  11. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I wish I could get those flush metal plates on the toes of my shoes.
    Here is the "Repair" catalogue from an Austrian wholesaler to the shoe trade.
    (Probably where Fritzl's fittings came from.)
    http://www.pflueger.at/images/downlo..._reparatur.pdf

    Go to the last page (17 of 17) and you'll find "Schuhbeschläge - Shoe fittings":

    They supply them in relatively small quantities =10 pairs.



    Here is the manufacturer, but I heard, they sell only in full boxes:
    http://www.gowi.de/

    Go to "Schuhbedarf" - 2nd page

    Try to contact either of them.
     


  12. bigbris1

    bigbris1 Senior member

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    Thanks guys, I knew those weren't the flush mounted ones, but much better than the average metal taps you can find at your local shoe repair.
     


  13. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Those are the flush mounted (recessed) toe plates:

    [​IMG]

    Available from Gowi or Pflueger.
     


  14. janne melkersson

    janne melkersson Senior member

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    dopey et all
    I missed this tread but here is a late thank you for the kind words!

    dopey
    You got it right, I made the last and Pelle Kraft made the rest of the shoes and James Doobridge made the trees.
    The leather is reversed waxed calf. JP Myhre in Oslo imported the skin from Austria and treat it with a special dressing and tallow. I am really glad to co-operate with these and other craftsmen, a life time is to short to know all about shoe and boot making.


    I like this leather very much because it has character. Not that only, it is a soft and durable leather which will hold up for a long time of wear. In England they polish this kind of leather and make it glossy. The Queens Household regiment got it on their boots and they are like mirrors! However, I like it better the way your looks.


    Hopefully I will have the chance to visit New York again.

    Janne
     


  15. bigbris1

    bigbris1 Senior member

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    Those are the flush mounted (recessed) toe plates:

    [​IMG]

    Available from Gowi or Pflueger.


    Thanks for that. I wonder how installing these would fair with the welt stitching & all?
     


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