Shoes and cold states (Michigan, Alaska, Canada and so on)

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by the_sulks, Oct 28, 2012.

  1. gsugsu

    gsugsu Senior member

    Messages:
    894
    Likes Received:
    111
    Joined:
    May 9, 2008
    In and out of a vehicle or for a short walk I wear a derby boot with Ridgeway sole irrespective of temperature if I am wearing a suit or odd jacket.
     


  2. benjclark

    benjclark Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    3
    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2012
    Location:
    Omaha, Nebraska
    When it gets very cold, safety becomes much more important. When it hits that -40 and lower, it's time to bust out the military surplus bunny boots they issue to guys pulling duty in the arctic. I found mine NOS still wrapped up USMC from 1950.
     


  3. bboysdontcryy

    bboysdontcryy Senior member

    Messages:
    1,321
    Likes Received:
    227
    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2010
    Location:
    London
    

    Definitely if it becomes uncomfortable, I wouldn't recommend it, but I've always managed to get by with my Redwings and thick socks on 5 degrees F (-15 C) days.
     


  4. the_sulks

    the_sulks Senior member

    Messages:
    251
    Likes Received:
    4
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2011
    
    Out of the vehicle. Trudging long distances.
     


  5. the_sulks

    the_sulks Senior member

    Messages:
    251
    Likes Received:
    4
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2011
    
    Right now what I'm trying to do is to buy some burgundy or oxblood warm shoes with the fur inside for cold weather. The task seems to be impossible as I see only black or brown colors around.
     


  6. House

    House Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2012
    When it's that cold you wear valenki. Buy some galoshi to wear over them if it's a wet cold or dirty in the city.
     


  7. gsugsu

    gsugsu Senior member

    Messages:
    894
    Likes Received:
    111
    Joined:
    May 9, 2008
    For below zero conditions where I am trudging through snow I wear a form of valenki though more structured. A filzstiefel or felt boot. Goodyear storm welted, Vibram sole, leather boot with wool felt shaft. Can also get them shearling lined. Good to about -30 Celsius. You can extend the comfort range by using different types or combinations of wool felt or shearling insoles. I wear Diemme but there are many makers that do them including Ludwig Reiter.

    Fritzl says traditional winter boot for Austrians is a black scotch grain Norweger on Vibram with or without shearling lining.

    I think Edward Green does a shearling lined Galway. Can't remember if it is on a Ridgeway or Dainite. Also can't remember if it is RTW or MTO. Good combination of form and function but you would not wear them inside.

    Beyond -30 I wear a Steiger mukluk which has the wool felt liner like a Sorel boot but is far lighter. You can go up in size and width to add additional liners and felt and/or shearling insoles. This boot will serve you well if you are outside all day in frigid temperatures or walking to the arctic circle. Not so good for wearing around town with your suit.

    At some point, style does go out the window when it is extremely cold.
     


  8. Claghorn

    Claghorn Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    10,092
    Likes Received:
    21,482
    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2012
    Location:
    Texas.
    This. This X 1000.
     


  9. LeviMay

    LeviMay Senior member

    Messages:
    852
    Likes Received:
    246
    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2011
    Location:
    Alberta
    As was mentioned, the main offenders in winter time are the snow itself, as well as the salt and sludge crap that builds up as the roads are salted and sanded.

    I used to keep my shoes at work and wear boots for the trip, but have since taken to wearing rubber overshoes for any excursions outdoors.
     


  10. JCPhoto

    JCPhoto Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2010
    Location:
    Calgary
    

    This has been what I've done in recent years, got a pair of the LL.Bean Khatadin Iron workers, give them a good wipe down and apply some Obenaufs Heavy Duty LP at the start and once in the middle of the season when they get really salty and a little beat up. Change into my nice shoes once I get to the office. They're on their fourth year and still going strong, with warm socks they're fine to -20 C or so for reasonable periods of time outside, but if it's colder or you're out all day long you'll want something with a liner. Like others have said the real kicker is the salt.
     


  11. dbhdnhdbh

    dbhdnhdbh Senior member

    Messages:
    332
    Likes Received:
    45
    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2012
    Any boots warm enough to protect your feet from meaningful exposure to that kind of cold will be far to warm to wear indoors. So you will have to change into conventional shoes once you get inside. That being the case, avoid frostbite and get boots made for severe cold. These will be big, insulated, but not necessarily heavy. Waterproof bottoms are a good idea in case the cold is accompanied by slush or freezing rain. In cold areas no one expects people to trudge through snow and salty slush in dress shoes.
     


  12. the_sulks

    the_sulks Senior member

    Messages:
    251
    Likes Received:
    4
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2011
    
    Very interesting. Don't you have to wash your outdoors shoes every day to wipe the dirt away. I have to wipe my shoes down every day (especially if it is slushy outside).
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2012


  13. House

    House Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2012
     


  14. House

    House Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2012
     


  15. Gdot

    Gdot Senior member

    Messages:
    5,248
    Likes Received:
    275
    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2011
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA
    

    I no longer live in a cold climate. But I grew up in suburban Chicago - so I know from cold, slush and salt.

    Those zip up overshoes make complete sense to me. Those silly 'swims' that everyone around here seems to love might be good for a drizzle - but for 'normal' winter conditions including salt and grimy slush they are useless.

    Rubber zip up overshoes are great - good protection - easy on and off - stretchy rubber fits over all sorts of shoe shapes. No insulation is about the only drawback. I used to pull heavy wool socks OVER my dress shoes before putting on boots - protected the shoes from scuffing and provided extra insulation.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2012


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by