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Shoemaking Techniques and Traditions--"...these foolish things..."

DWFII

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Goodyear welt gemming typically sits 1/4 inch inside the edge of the insole, so the seam will sit deeper underneath the upper. When handwelting you can choose where you cut the holdfast, you could even come out the edge of the insole and welt to that for the minimum gap possible.
Many lasts are curved under at the extreme forepart of the toe, just above the featherline. Some makers call that a 'snake head' toe.

If the last is made (or modified) to eliminate that undercut, then cutting the insole to follow the lines of the toe helps. You can't really cut it perpendicular to the plantar surface of the last.

It's hard to describe this whole process---that's why I said you would almost have to be a shoemaker to understand.
 

madhat

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Many lasts are curved under at the extreme forepart of the toe, just above the featherline. Some makers call that a 'snake head' toe.

If the last is made (or modified) to eliminate that undercut, then cutting the insole to follow the lines of the toe helps. You can't really cut it perpendicular to the plantar surface of the last.

It's hard to describe this whole process---that's why I said you would almost have to be a shoemaker to understand.
Searching "snake head toe" yields much more ridiculous examples that what you are likely describing.
 

DWFII

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Searching "snake head toe" yields much more ridiculous examples that what you are likely describing.
Well, what can I say? Shoemakers...Sheesh!! :crackup:

I, myself, wouldn't necessarily call a last (remember it's the last not the shoe I was describing) shaped like that a 'snakehead' unless I was trying to illustrate a point to a student. But I have heard such lasts referred to in that way.
 

bengal-stripe

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In a shoe factory the insoles get cut by dies (think cookie cutters) and hydraulic presses. Every last in every size and width has a corresponding insole die which will cut out the right size to fit the particular last. Due to the nature of cutter and press, all cuts will be perpendicular and will fit the last without individual corrections.

In a handmade shoe the insole, mellow (damp) and still oversized gets fixed to the last. Once dry the insole, still fixed to the last, gets cut manually. Here the shoemaker is not restricted to perpendicular only. He can follow the sweep of a particular section within the last, shaping the insole accordingly. The insole will be cut individually and can can be perpendicular in certain sections but flowing out or moving in in other sections.
 

tallyho

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Sorry if this is the wrong place to post, but someone can shed some light on this stamp? I've never seen them before. I'm about to pick up this one from a local leather shop with a shell cordovan tag. Thank you very much!
1642583887939.png
shell.png
 

SimonC

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It'll be from a Japanese source - I thought Shinki Hikaku had a green label so maybe this is by someone else - possibly Leder Ogawa?
 

Bic Pentameter

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Sorry if this is the wrong place to post, but someone can shed some light on this stamp? I've never seen them before. I'm about to pick up this one from a local leather shop with a shell cordovan tag. Thank you very much!
View attachment 1739591 View attachment 1739592
It is Japanese. It is from the Japanese associate of leather measurers. The blue number is the place where the leather was measured. and the black number is the number of square centimeters.

Bic
 

tallyho

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It'll be from a Japanese source - I thought Shinki Hikaku had a green label so maybe this is by someone else - possibly Leder Ogawa?
Yeah, shinki changed their stamp to the orange, though. Btw, the last time I saw the ogawa, they used ink stamp.
 

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tallyho

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It is Japanese. It is from the Japanese associate of leather measurers. The blue number is the place where the leather was measured. and the black number is the number of square centimeters.

Bic
Thanks! Though, it's not square centimeters but square decimeters, i think???
 

Schweino

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I bought some boots with an unlined shaft where unfortunately the shaft is too wide for my legs.
I am wondering if there are ways to adjust the shaft width on a finished boot.

Because they are unlined the backseam of the shaft can easily be accessed and removed to have the shaft taken in a bit is my idea. My cobbler tells me that he indeed can do it but that in order to blind stitch the backseam of the shaft the leather has to lie flat which cannot be done withouth deconstructing the entire boot.
He can make this adjustment with a more visible stitch though he tells me.

Do any of you have any experience with this type of adjustment or have some advice on how to adjust the shaft width on a boot (without using tongue pads)?
 

j ingevaldsson

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I bought some boots with an unlined shaft where unfortunately the shaft is too wide for my legs.
I am wondering if there are ways to adjust the shaft width on a finished boot.

Because they are unlined the backseam of the shaft can easily be accessed and removed to have the shaft taken in a bit is my idea. My cobbler tells me that he indeed can do it but that in order to blind stitch the backseam of the shaft the leather has to lie flat which cannot be done withouth deconstructing the entire boot.
He can make this adjustment with a more visible stitch though he tells me.

Do any of you have any experience with this type of adjustment or have some advice on how to adjust the shaft width on a boot (without using tongue pads)?
If you adjust the backseam the whole pattern will become unbalanced, so for you not to sort of lean your leg forward but stand straight you will pull the quarters backward with strain and creases likely occuring. So even if one could take in the backseam technically (which could be done with some types of sewing machine, some cobblers and leather repair workshops has them but not all, or potentially by hand depending on skill of the cobbler and type of boot) likely not recommended to do it, will be uncomfortable and look bad.
 

benjamin831

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How does Spigola finish their soles in such a pale leather color? If it's burnished, waxed, and sealed properly, it should be much darker, no?


 

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