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Shoe question

jcusey

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What do you call it when the throat of the shoe runs all the way back to the heel? For an example, take a look at shoe #1 in this picture from the GJ Cleverley website:
 

AJL

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deep throat...?
 

shoefan

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I don't know that it has a specific name, per se. Most names seem to apply to the toe treatment. I've seen and own a pair of "long-wing tips" from BB/Alden which has a somewhat similar look, except that the perfing extends all the way along the shoe from a wing-tip toe, rather than from the front of the throat, i.e. similar to the styling of the old double-soled, heavy (battleship weight) oxfords and bluchers from the 50's and 60's. Since there are many ways to decorate the quarters, they don't seem to have separate names that I know of.
 

bengal-stripe

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Here in England, it's either called a "Balmoral" or a "Galoshes Oxford". (I know in the States a "Balmoral" is what you call in English an "Oxford"). Samples by John Lobb:
or Edward Green's "Gladstone":
or the boot version "Shannon"
 

T4phage

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I agree with Bengal-Stripe. If you have the current Cleverley catalogue, look at shoe #17, which is described as a Balmoral.
 

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