Shoe Damage... The Bad Kind

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by tjc4golf, Oct 13, 2009.

  1. tjc4golf

    tjc4golf Senior member

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    The evening was off to a good start: left work at a reasonable hour, stopped at a pizza joint and was ready to head home to gorge and watch the Phillies dispatch of the Rockies when it happened. Hands occupied with pizza, I proceeded ass first out of the pizza shop using my booty to open the door then, having made it through the doorway, turned to face forward and was about to take off for home when the door's hyperactive spring mechanism kicked in closing the door on my left heel. As I lifted my heel I could feel the door scrape across the heel. I looked down and was horrified to see:

    [​IMG]


    I realize that they'll never be the same but am hopeful that they can be mended to the point that the damage is not readily noticeable (the location helps) and they're wearable again. I've thought about bringing them to my shoe guy but I'm not sure if he's got any tools at his disposal that I don't as this isn't a standard operation (at least as far as I'm aware) and am thinking about giving this a shot myself. Currently my plan is:
    1. Use a toothpick to apply a small amount of gorilla glue underneath the piece of leather that is flapping in the breeze. This should secure this piece to the shoe and cover up the most noticeable damage.
    2. Antique heels to a darker shade of brown with cream polish
    3. Apply wax polish to even out scuffs

    Anyone had any success with similar damage? Good/bad idea doing this myself? My game plan sound good?
     


  2. Drydis Greis

    Drydis Greis Senior member

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    The evening was off to a good start: left work at a reasonable hour, stopped at a pizza joint and was ready to head home to gorge and watch the Phillies dispatch of the Rockies when it happened. Hands occupied with pizza, I proceeded ass first out of the pizza shop using my booty to open the door then, having made it through the doorway, turned to face forward and was about to take off for home when the door's hyperactive spring mechanism kicked in closing the door on my left heel. As I lifted my heel I could feel the door scrape across the heel. I looked down and was horrified to see:

    [​IMG]


    I realize that they'll never be the same but am hopeful that they can be mended to the point that the damage is not readily noticeable (the location helps) and they're wearable again. I've thought about bringing them to my shoe guy but I'm not sure if he's got any tools at his disposal that I don't as this isn't a standard operation (at least as far as I'm aware) and am thinking about giving this a shot myself. Currently my plan is:
    1. Use a toothpick to apply a small amount of gorilla glue underneath the piece of leather that is flapping in the breeze. This should secure this piece to the shoe and cover up the most noticeable damage.
    2. Antique heels to a darker shade of brown with cream polish
    3. Apply wax polish to even out scuffs

    Anyone had any success with similar damage? Good/bad idea doing this myself? My game plan sound good?


    Who is the maker of the shoe?
     


  3. tjc4golf

    tjc4golf Senior member

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    Testoni Black Label
     


  4. Chips

    Chips Senior member

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    I think I'd do the exact same thing. Except, trouble is, I can't remember if Gorilla Glue is an type that foams up as it dries or not.

    I'd be more inclined to let a cobbler use an appropriate glue to be honest with you. The rest of the creme and pollishing you can do yourself. Take your time, and they should turn out plenty serviceable.
     


  5. j

    j (stands for Jerk) Admin

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    Who is the maker of the shoe?
    That's basically what I do when this happens to me, except I usually have super glue handy. I'm sure either would probably be fine. Also, you may want to set some polish on fire to melt it, then blow it out and smear some on the chipped area to sort of fill in the cracks. But keep in mind it may darken the edges, so try that at your own discretion. Personally I like my shoes to look a little beat up but cared for (mainly just not new looking) so it doesn't bother me at all.
     


  6. Drydis Greis

    Drydis Greis Senior member

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    Testoni Black Label

    E-mail them and ask if they can fix the shoe. If not, take it to a local "trusted" cobbler and see what can be done. You are lucky you didn't loose a body part, or cheek, when that door slammed shut!!!
     


  7. j

    j (stands for Jerk) Admin

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    I think I'd do the exact same thing. Except, trouble is, I can't remember if Gorilla Glue is an type that foams up as it dries or not.

    I'd be more inclined to let a cobbler use an appropriate glue to be honest with you. The rest of the creme and pollishing you can do yourself. Take your time, and they should turn out plenty serviceable.

    Or this. Probably worth taking them in if you want it done properly.
     


  8. acidboy

    acidboy Senior member

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    I'd bring it to a cobbler just because the scuffed area around it also needs to be fixed.
     


  9. Tarmac

    Tarmac Senior member

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    I would probably rip the flap off and condition it a few times. then polish
     


  10. ThinkDerm

    ThinkDerm Senior member

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    crazy glue the flap back on, allow to sit for 24 hours.

    condition the scuffs with liberal lexol, wait 24 hours

    gently buff the back of the shoe with a soft non-ribbed undershirt

    condition the scuffs with lexol again, wait 24 hours.

    gently buff the back of the shoe with a soft non-ribbed undershirt

    apply appropriate shoe saphir cream to area (slightly darker than shoe) - pick this up cheap from www. francos.com - allow to sit for 24 hours.

    gently buff the back of the shoe with a soft non-ribbed undershirt

    then take a bit of shoe wax - slightly darker than cream, melt it down with lighter (gently) - apply using soft bristle clean USED toothbrush to area to be treated. allow to dry for 15 minutes.

    aggressively buff the back of the shoe with a soft non-ribbed undershirt

    do the melted shoe wax again. allow to dry for 15 minutes. spritz the back of the shoe with champagne (moet works fine for this). gently buff the back of the shoe with a soft non-ribbed undershirt.

    then apply final wax - non melted to area. allow to sit for 1 hours. then buff like your life is depending on it.

    shoes will look good as new if you follow these directions.

    take photos along the way.
     


  11. tacitvs

    tacitvs Senior member

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    take photos along the way.
    I like this suggestion. Curious to see what you do and how it comes out. My vote is for DIY and keeping the flap (as long as it flattens back and won't appear as a bump when you are done).
     


  12. mr monty

    mr monty Senior member

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    I would probably rip the flap off and condition it a few times. then polish

    +1 I would cut it off with a razor blade
     


  13. imatlas

    imatlas Senior member

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    If you glue down the flap, use barge cement or crazy glue, but definitely not gorilla glue - it foams up and will make a mess.
     


  14. MyOtherLife

    MyOtherLife Senior member

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    Do not use crazy glue. It will make the leather brittle on that spot.
    Have your cobbler use a drop of contact cement on the shoe & the flap of leather.
    The same cement he would use to fasten TOPY's.
    Then he can buff out the rest for you.
    Or if you are brave enough, you can do it yourself. Just let the contact cement dry under the flap, and the spot of leather that the flap will glue back to. then press hard with the back of a spoon, then buff out the scratches. It will be fine.
     


  15. tjc4golf

    tjc4golf Senior member

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    Thanks to all who have responded with suggestions.

    I still haven't decided whether I'll take it to the cobbler or do it myself. My hesitation with the cobbler is twofold:
    (1) I prefer taking him the type of work for which I understand exactly what he's going to do and what the finished product is going to look like. I've never taken this sort of work to him, or any cobbler for that matter, so I don't know what to expect. I realize that this spot is never going to be perfect again and when I look at it I'd rather think "I did a shitty repair job" than "the cobbler did a shitty job".
    (2) I like doing stuff myself and it might be fun to take photos along the way.

    Whether I decide to do it myself or take it to the cobbler, I'll update the tread with after photos when done.

    It sounds like a few people have had sucess with the crazy glue but Man of Lint warns it could dry the leather. Has anyone who has used the crazy glue experience drying? Man of Lint, is this the same type of contact cement that a cobbler would use?
     


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