Shoe Damage Report & Shoe P0rn Central - Part II

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Oyaji, Feb 20, 2010.

  1. fritzl

    fritzl Senior member

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    Thank you guys. The sole is Vibram.

    good quality but it looks geriatric...
     
  2. TylerDurden

    TylerDurden Senior member

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    Don't do it! - Those shoes are hardly worn. - You'll be wasting your money!!! The insole will mould to your feet. That moulding process is a permanent one, not like stepping into a Plaster-of-Paris dish. The insole will re-align to your feet. Wear them about half a dozen times, and you won't notice, they were once worn by a different person.
    To late! Mailed them yesterday morning for the $99 fix..... Oh well...... They'll last another 10 years or so before they'll need it again....
     
  3. fritzl

    fritzl Senior member

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    To late! Mailed them yesterday morning for the $99 fix..... Oh well...... They'll last another 10 years or so before they'll need it again....

    it's still a waste and they'll likely lose a bit of their character they had. though depending on your wearing habits, it's unlikely to expect ten years before the next fix...
     
  4. adagio

    adagio Senior member

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    I'm sure someone else has probably posted these before but I think they deserve another outing. C&J Tetbury in brown suede. Got them from Bodileys http://www.shoesnorthampton.co.uk/. Excellent service and they don't charge for shipping making them about €20 cheaper overall than PLAL. Oh, and a 17 hour delivery time [​IMG] JL Romsey below for comparison. [​IMG][​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  5. NOBD

    NOBD Senior member

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    What's the colour name of that suede, adagio?
     
  6. adagio

    adagio Senior member

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  7. NOBD

    NOBD Senior member

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  8. jhcam8

    jhcam8 Senior member

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    Don't do it! - Those shoes are hardly worn. - You'll be wasting your money!!!

    The insole will mould to your feet. That moulding process is a permanent one, not like stepping into a Plaster-of-Paris dish.
    The insole will re-align to your feet. Wear them about half a dozen times, and you won't notice, they were once worn by a different person.


    This has not been my experience.
     
  9. Lord-Barrington

    Lord-Barrington Senior member

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    This is a great thread. Some if the most twisted, dark, and perverse porn ever. It's better (worse?) than "Backdoor Sluts 9".
     
  10. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    This has not been my experience.
    ^+1 I don't want to pursue this but I thought an additional observation might add some perspective... Have those who think an insole will re-form, ever seen a "tooled" belt? Or a saddle that was ornately tooled? Do you understand how this is accomplished? The leather is thoroughly moistened and then allowed to dry back to the original colour and reduced moisture content. This process is called "tempering." It is not unlike the wetting and drying that take place in a shoe. At that point, the surface of the leather is carved (for definition) and "stamped." The stamping compresses the fibers of the leather. The carving is not necessary to achieve this compression. Carving merely creates sharp edges...in fact, some older "schools" of tooling do not carve at all. Then the leather is allowed to finish drying. Years and years later, after many uses, a belt or saddle will retain that tooling to a remarkable degree. Even after the saddle is ridden in the rain or put up wet. Saddle leather is significantly softer than insole leather. It would not be impossible to "tool" insole leather but it wouldn't be as easy as saddle leather. That said, once a footbed has been created in an the insole, it is very similar to the tooled saddle. The fibers have been compressed under the weight of the foot and the impact pressure of walking. Other fibers have been displaced to form contours that are proud to the surface. Because the insole leather starts out firmer than "tooling leather" it will hold the impressing more persistently. If a saddle can hold the tooling after decades of hard use...sometimes even a century or more... how does it make sense to expect an insole to relax and "forget" the contours that have been beaten into it?
     
  11. fritzl

    fritzl Senior member

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    If a saddle can hold the tooling after decades of hard use...sometimes even a century or more... how does it make sense to expect an insole to relax and "forget" the contours that have been beaten into it?

    i do not expect that, but the insoles AE is using are pure junk. so this guy would have been better of to use his local cobbler.

    just my two cents.
     
  12. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    i do not expect that, but the insoles AE is using are pure junk. so this guy would have been better of to use his local cobbler. just my two cents.
    Well, without reference to AE, I agree with you...as I said in my earlier remarks. Everything changes--all expectations and assumptions are moot--if you're talking about fiberboard or very thin and/or poor quality insoles backed by cork (essentially heavy sockliners). That said, $100.00 for a re-crafting isn't much more than the local cobbler would have charged for a full sole and heel and the insole would almost certainly not have been replaced. The whole point of course, is to know what you're getting into when you buy used shoes--incompatibly contoured insole is the least of it.[​IMG] I've got a line on some used mattresses (from hotels in NY) I might want to sell cheap.[​IMG]
     
  13. fritzl

    fritzl Senior member

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    1. Well, without reference to AE, I agree with you...as I said in my earlier remarks. Everything changes--all expectations and assumptions are moot--if you're talking about fiberboard or very thin and/or poor quality insoles backed by cork.

    2. That said, $100.00 for a re-crafting isn't much more than the local cobbler would have charged for a full sole and heel and the insole would almost certainly not have been replaced.


    1. this

    2. point is. the soles and the heels are in good condition. all he had needed would have been a skilled guy, who replaces the insoles. i'm not familiar with cobbler prizes in the U.S., but it seems that they are definitely lower in the neck of my woods. not talking hungary. they are really low.
     
  14. jhcam8

    jhcam8 Senior member

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    Just in - Rider Boots from Leffot
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  15. Sander

    Sander Senior member

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    Are those khaki-colored jeans? They look interesting.
     

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