shoe construction...behind the veil

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by DWFII, Jul 24, 2010.

  1. fritzl

    fritzl Senior member

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    no issue
     
  2. handmadeboots

    handmadeboots New Member

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    They use lemonwood pegs because it swells with the leather.
     
  3. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    and shrink as it dries.
     
  4. Xenon

    Xenon Senior member

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    Is that an issue? or does the leather shrink simultaneously together?
     
  5. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    It's a particular issue in dry climates. The peg and the leather shrink at different rates. But again, you have a "vertical" attachment that fundamentally has little or no flexibility (that's why a shoe that has a pegged forepart will be stiffer than a welted shoe...marginally or moreso, depending on how many rows of pegs are driven and how close together they are), so the peg is constantly working in opposition to flex. It's not a perfect marriage.
     
  6. TKDKid

    TKDKid Senior member

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    I don't know of any English shoe manufacturer whose name ends with "an". The only shoe brand I can think of is Mezlan, but they are neither English, nor are they highly touted (at least on this forum).
     
  7. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    I don't know what that label said...it wasn't my shoe. I do know the maker, however, and you're correct the name doesn't end in "an." However, if you look a little closer you'll see the insole has been stamped , and says "Made in England"
     
  8. KObalto

    KObalto Senior member

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    Probably Cole Haan. Some of their shoes are/were made in England.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2012
  9. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    No, sorry. The name does not end in ''an"
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2012
  10. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    You are right, the label is Cole Haan.

    In the late 80s and early 90s, in addition to their American-made range which consisted mainly, or maybe even exclusively, of moccasins, Cole Haan offered an "English collection" . Those were made until maybe 88 by Edward Green and were labelled as "Edward Green for Cole Haan". Subsequently manufacture was shifted to Cheaney, those shoes were labelled with Cole Haan and nothing else.

    The shoe in the photograph are Cheaney, easily recognized by the markings of the insole:" Leather Insoles" surrounded by a circle of "Made in England" (It always looks like "Made in Leather Insoles England"). Cole Haan's English collection was stopped sometime between 1992/94. Thereafter Cole Haan offered an Italian range (no idea who manufactured them). Cole Haan was bought in 2000/02 by Nike and their products are now solely of Asian manufacture.

    These shoes pictured are approximately 20 years old. We haven't seen any photographs of the shoes themselves, who knows they might have had a hard life in intervening decades (in and out of cobbler shops) and it might be rather unfair to put the blame on the process or the manufacture.

    As comparison

    [​IMG]

    Fully hand-made bespoke shoes (of finest provenance), made sometime after 1992.


    [​IMG]

    Cole Haan made by Edward Green (about 1987) and refurbished in the factory 2007

    Would you put the responsibility for the state of those shoes onto the owner or the shoemaking firm?
     
  11. RDiaz

    RDiaz Senior member

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    But I can read "COLE" in the first picture too...

    EDIT: Sorry, I didn't notice you meant the actual manufacturer, which as stated above seems to be Cheaney... ignore this.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2012
  12. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    The shoes I posted were said to be Foster's. I have no reason to doubt the owner but I am not familiar enough (just the name) with Cole Haans or their labels or variations to say one way or the other. They had never had a new sole, didn't need one at the time I inspected them and took the photo, and the owner said he hadn't worn them more than about ten times...and then only on carpet.

    Regardless of the maker, whose fault is it that the gemming was slipping? My point of view is that here is only one way to be sure it is not the maker's fault--avoid gemmed shoes.
     
  13. RDiaz

    RDiaz Senior member

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    Are blake/rapid and norvegesse better constructions then?

    I would get shoes made that way (as most hand welted goodyear shoes are out of reach for me) but I'm afrad I'm not gonna be able to have them resoled when needed...
     
  14. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    This is the classic Cole Haan logo, the one featured on the shoes pictured:
    [​IMG]

    Which they have ditched (don’t know when) in favour of this logo:
    [​IMG]


    Cheaney produced for Cole Haan in the early 80s. That is the time those shoes were manufactured. For all we know, your friend might have stored the shoes for twenty years on top of the central heating. (Or he confused them with some other shoes he might have bought from Foster.) Apart from their bespoke shoes, Fosters does not produce any of their ready-to-wear shoes. They come from different Northampton manufacturers (according to price point). All Foster RTW feature the Foster label, but not the name of the manufacturer. So, Foster will never, ever have sold Cole Haan shoes.

    A single pair of faulty shoes is nothing but anecdotal evidence. Church's refurbishes some 500 pairs per week. Someone who works in their repair workshop could give reliable figures, what percentage of repairs need the gemming replaced or re-attached. Upper leather cracking is without doubt a far greater problem for shoe longevity than slipped gemming.

    Remember in the 60s when fusing for garments was introduced, there were problems with fusing "bubbling" after a standard dry clean? That doesn't happen today anymore. Why should gemming (or adhesives) not have improved in the 50-60 odd years it has been in general use?
     
  15. mr monty

    mr monty Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     

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