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shoe care supply checklist

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by aybojs, May 9, 2005.

  1. Lendial

    Lendial Well-Known Member

    Messages:
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    Nov 2, 2009
    Location:
    Seattle , WA
    I currently only use kiwi polish but would it be wise to swap to meltonian cream instead? I'm really more interested in prolonging shoe life rather than a shiny finish. or perhaps use both somehow?
     
  2. Boston Tweed

    Boston Tweed Senior member

    Messages:
    106
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    Feb 12, 2009
    I currently only use kiwi polish but would it be wise to swap to meltonian cream instead? I'm really more interested in prolonging shoe life rather than a shiny finish. or perhaps use both somehow?

    I use a mix of both Meltonian (or AE) cream and Kiwi wax...I tend to more or less alternate their use on any given pair of shoes. I've some shoes that have had this treatment are at least a decade old and have been through several resoles and they still look good. While this may not be the absolute optimal process, I think using either product (or any of the well known and recommended products on SF) should be adequate to insure a long, useful and good looking life for your shoes. Honestly, I only think the real differences show up after a LONG time, and unless you are really dealing with high end shoes I wouldn't sweat the difference.
     
  3. westinghouse

    westinghouse Senior member

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    Location:
    NYC
    I use a leather cleaner to remove old wax, followed followed by a leather conditioner, followed by Kiwi wax. All buffed off with a horsehair brush.
     
  4. blazingazn

    blazingazn Senior member

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    Vancouver
    getting no love as a individual thread so I though I'd post here for all you subscribers



    What are your opinions of Moneysworth & Best Leather Care Products?
    I've used them before no real complaints. Are they better or worst than most brands?

    I want to get a shoe care kit, don't want to have to compile a bunch of stuff.


    Basically looks like I'll need
    Cleaner
    Conditioner
    Polish
    Waterproofing (Wax, oil or spray)
    Shine Brush x 2
    Polish Applicator Brush x 2
    Polish Cloth x 2
     
  5. FidelCashflow

    FidelCashflow Senior member

    Messages:
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    Oct 15, 2007
    Location:
    Canada
    What are your opinions of Moneysworth & Best Leather Care Products? I've used them before no real complaints. Are they better or worst than most brands?
    No experience with them, but some cheaper brands use synthetic chemicals which do more damage in the long run (like those "instant shine" sponges.) If you want something reliable and easy to get, go for Allen Edmonds shoe care products. They're sold on allen edmonds website and pretty much anywhere that has allen edmonds shoes. I've used those for years and they're great.
    Basically looks like I'll need Cleaner Conditioner Polish Waterproofing (Wax, oil or spray) Shine Brush x 2 Polish Applicator Brush x 2 Polish Cloth x 2
    Allen Edmonds does a 2 in one cleaner/conditioner, so you don't need those separately (just wipe the dust off with a damp cloth, rub this stuff in with a terry cloth) Skip the waterproofing crap. I've used these before and it just ruins the polish of the shoes. I use it for suede but never for leather. You don't want to wear any good pair of dress shoes in the pouring rain, regardless of whether you water-proofed them or not (get rubber overshoes.) If it's very light rain, any good shoe polish will have some wax content which will give it a very basic water resistance. Shine brushes are essential (get horsehair ones.) If you use allen edmonds shoe polish cream, the tubes actually have the applicator sponge right on the tube, so you can skip the applicator brush. For polish clothes, if you have a ton of old shoe storage bags lying around, you can just cut those into squares and they're perfect for polishing with. My shoecare kit basically consists of the following: -A bottle of AE leather conditioner -Some tubes of AE shoe polish -2 horsehair brushes -a few old cut up shoe bags It gets great results.
     
  6. SpallaCamiccia

    SpallaCamiccia Senior member

    Messages:
    2,364
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2010
    Location:
    Between Pinkos land and the sanitarium.
    No experience with them, but some cheaper brands use synthetic chemicals which do more damage in the long run (like those "instant shine" sponges.) If you want something reliable and easy to get, go for Allen Edmonds shoe care products. They're sold on allen edmonds website and pretty much anywhere that has allen edmonds shoes. I've used those for years and they're great. Allen Edmonds does a 2 in one cleaner/conditioner, so you don't need those separately (just wipe the dust off with a damp cloth, rub this stuff in with a terry cloth) Skip the waterproofing crap. I've used these before and it just ruins the polish of the shoes. I use it for suede but never for leather. You don't want to wear any good pair of dress shoes in the pouring rain, regardless of whether you water-proofed them or not (get rubber overshoes.) If it's very light rain, any good shoe polish will have some wax content which will give it a very basic water resistance. Shine brushes are essential (get horsehair ones.) If you use allen edmonds shoe polish cream, the tubes actually have the applicator sponge right on the tube, so you can skip the applicator brush. For polish clothes, if you have a ton of old shoe storage bags lying around, you can just cut those into squares and they're perfect for polishing with. My shoecare kit basically consists of the following: -A bottle of AE leather conditioner -Some tubes of AE shoe polish -2 horsehair brushes -a few old cut up shoe bags It gets great results.
    Nice lesson. I wanted to buy a waterproof spray for soles. Is it a good idea? I only use conditioner, the same I use for leather car seats. I don´t like the tube cream or kiwi rounded metal one . It makes my shoes pasty and attract more dirt. I do well?
     
  7. FidelCashflow

    FidelCashflow Senior member

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    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2007
    Location:
    Canada
    Nice lesson.

    I wanted to buy a waterproof spray for soles. Is it a good idea?

    I only use conditioner, the same I use for leather car seats. I don´t like the tube cream or kiwi rounded metal one . It makes my shoes pasty and attract more dirt.

    I do well?


    I've honestly never thought about using waterproof spray for the soles of the shoes. I don't suppose it can hurt, but if you're walking through lots of puddles, I don't know how effective it will be. Although they call them "waterproof" sprays, in my experience they're more "water repellant". If it's a light rain and you get a few drops on your shoes, it rolls right off, but if it's alot of water, it will eventually soak through.

    I've heard of other people using the car leather conditioner for shoes. At the end of the day, it's all dyed leather so it really shouldn't matter whether it says its made for hang bags, shoes, or car seats. As long as it gets good results, thats what matters most.
     
  8. SpallaCamiccia

    SpallaCamiccia Senior member

    Messages:
    2,364
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2010
    Location:
    Between Pinkos land and the sanitarium.
    I've honestly never thought about using waterproof spray for the soles of the shoes. I don't suppose it can hurt, but if you're walking through lots of puddles, I don't know how effective it will be. Although they call them "waterproof" sprays, in my experience they're more "water repellant". If it's a light rain and you get a few drops on your shoes, it rolls right off, but if it's alot of water, it will eventually soak through.

    I've heard of other people using the car leather conditioner for shoes. At the end of the day, it's all dyed leather so it really shouldn't matter whether it says its made for hang bags, shoes, or car seats. As long as it gets good results, thats what matters most.



    Yes you´re right, is " water repellant" Sorry for my basic English. It hardly never rains where I live but I want to avoid damaging the soles as most of the time the streets are very wet from the street cleaners.

    Should I buy one spray ? It´s worth 6 euros
     
  9. Swan Song

    Swan Song Senior member

    Messages:
    349
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    Jun 17, 2009
    Location:
    South of the Red, North of the Brazos
    Is there anyone selling a cognac/tan edge dressing?

    I find "brown" does not accent my lighter colored boots
     
  10. cet2119

    cet2119 Member

    Messages:
    12
    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2010
    Is there anyone selling a cognac/tan edge dressing?

    I find "brown" does not accent my lighter colored boots

    Meltonian has cream in color cognac. You can use the cream for edge dressing.
     
  11. bapelolol

    bapelolol Senior member

    Messages:
    667
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    Jan 27, 2007
    For black shoes.. does it make a difference if I use black shoe cream or neutral shoe cream? Are there any benefits to using neutral over black shoe cream on black calfskin?
     
  12. Don Carlos

    Don Carlos Senior member

    Messages:
    7,527
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    May 15, 2009
    For black shoes.. does it make a difference if I use black shoe cream or neutral shoe cream? Are there any benefits to using neutral over black shoe cream on black calfskin?

    Use black shoe creams and polishes on black shoes. Neutral tends to leave a whitish residue, and it won't restore any lost color or cover scuffs as well as black will. Remember that "patina" on black shoes is not usually the goal; the goal here is to keep them a deep and rich black.
     
  13. andr3pwd

    andr3pwd Senior member

    Messages:
    147
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    Feb 28, 2010
    Great advice.

    For convenience, how good/bad/indifferent are the polishes found a little more easily such as Kiwi or Johnston & Murphy's house brand? Running to an AE store is quite a hike.
     
  14. Boston Tweed

    Boston Tweed Senior member

    Messages:
    106
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2009
    Is there anyone selling a cognac/tan edge dressing?

    I find "brown" does not accent my lighter colored boots


    AE sells one in a cognac/tan which I own, and it comes in a nice little bottle with a built in applicator that is fantastic. I think it costs ~$5, and I highly recommend it. Actually, I'd recommend you buy basically all of the colors, as they are great to have in your shoe kit, and if you are paying shipping once you might as well get your money's worth.
     
  15. cptjeff

    cptjeff Senior member

    Messages:
    4,642
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2010
    Location:
    DCish
    Great advice.

    For convenience, how good/bad/indifferent are the polishes found a little more easily such as Kiwi or Johnston & Murphy's house brand? Running to an AE store is quite a hike.


    Don't know J&M's house brand, but Kiwi is perfectly acceptable, as long as it's the proper tins and not those liquid shine things that dry out your leather.
     
  16. blazingazn

    blazingazn Senior member

    Messages:
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    Mar 23, 2010
    Location:
    Vancouver
    is edge dressing necessary is there any alternatives?

    are most sole edges black?
     
  17. bapelolol

    bapelolol Senior member

    Messages:
    667
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    Jan 27, 2007
    Am I supposed to apply the shoe cream to the shoe so it has a matte finish, let it sit for 10 minutes, then brush/buff it off?
     
  18. wetnose

    wetnose Senior member

    Messages:
    1,013
    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2009
    Am I supposed to apply the shoe cream to the shoe so it has a matte finish, let it sit for 10 minutes, then brush/buff it off?

    Yes. Generally I always do 2 pairs of shoes at 1 go. Apply cream to 1 pair then cream to 2nd pair. Have a drink, then buff off 1st pair, followed by 2nd.
     
  19. vincerich

    vincerich Senior member

    Messages:
    542
    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2010
    - Shoe trees ($20/pair)
    - Show cream (Meltonian is good, can also be used as edge dressing, $3/tin)
    - Shoe polish (Kiwi is good, $3/tin)
    - Cotton or flannel cloths (old t-shirts work fine)
    - Cleaner/conditioner (optional, $5 or so)




    There's my list.
     
  20. contactdo

    contactdo Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    62
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009
    - Shoe trees ($20/pair) - Show cream (Meltonian is good, can also be used as edge dressing, $3/tin) - Shoe polish (Kiwi is good, $3/tin) - Cotton or flannel cloths (old t-shirts work fine) - Cleaner/conditioner (optional, $5 or so)
    Im getting some products to take care of my shoes, but I'm a little confused about whether I need both a shoe cream and a shoe cream polish. I'm confused b/c I saw this picture: http://www.cedarshoetree.com/images/large/MELTC.jpg Newb question. Is that a shoe cream or a cream polish like it says on the tin or are they the same thing? If they are the same thing, does that mean I apply this first, then apply a wax polish such as Kiwi on top of it? Thanks in advance.
     

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