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shoe care supply checklist

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by aybojs, May 9, 2005.

  1. sanrensho

    sanrensho Senior member

    Messages:
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    Jul 18, 2007
    Is it possible to get a glaze shine on cordovan? I know that the mfg. recommend only occasional, light polishing.

    Yes, but it will not get a mirror-like finish like calfskin. Still, it looks very nice. I polish my burgundy shoes with black polish.

    I don't think there's anything wrong with polishing shell more often that the manufacturer recommends. The only downside I can see is the wax buildup in the creases that "flexes out" as you wear the shoes. I just brush it out before I leave for work, and do it again when I arrive at work.
     
  2. ziggyosk

    ziggyosk Senior member

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    You did nothing wrong, don't worry. The situation with this particular pair is that the toe is corrected grain, so with no grain you get no heat build-up to layer a finish on.....it's already baked on. In order to get the glass effect you see here, you need a full grain upper to work with.

    And I don't say corrected grain to criticize...most of us in the shoe business don't consider this as a negative like some here do. There is a place for everything, and this pattern is one where it looks great, as a compliment to the peccary or deer, depending on the maker.



    Oh don't worry I didn't take offense, thanks because I was thinking I just did it wrong. The corrected grain leather explains it. I just ordered 2 pairs of C&J shoes so I'm guessing those will be full-grain which this glazing technique will work on.

    thanks for your help.
     
  3. creampiggy

    creampiggy Senior member

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    Has anybody used Allen Edmonds shoe creams? How is it compared to Meltonian creams or similar brands? I can't find Meltonian creams in Toronto. Does anyone know where to purchase them? [​IMG]
     
  4. FidelCashflow

    FidelCashflow Senior member

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    Canada
    Has anybody used Allen Edmonds shoe creams? How is it compared to Meltonian creams or similar brands? I can't find Meltonian creams in Toronto. Does anyone know where to purchase them?
    I use the Allen Edmonds shoe polish that comes in the toothpaste style tube. They're great because they have the applicator built right into it, so you just squeeze it out and work it in using sponge tip on the tube. Once it's dried, buff it down with a horse-hair brush and you're good to go. I believe it also serves to moisturize. It really produces a terrific gleam, it's not as messy as other options, and it's a real time-saver. I've tried a few other brands and I wouldn't go back to any of them. [​IMG]
     
  5. creampiggy

    creampiggy Senior member

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    Aug 25, 2008
    I use the Allen Edmonds shoe polish that comes in the toothpaste style tube. They're great because they have the applicator built right into it, so you just squeeze it out and work it in using sponge tip on the tube. Once it's dried, buff it down with a horse-hair brush and you're good to go. I believe it also serves to moisturize. It really produces a terrific gleam, it's not as messy as other options, and it's a real time-saver. I've tried a few other brands and I wouldn't go back to any of them. [​IMG]
    Thanks for your suggestion, but I've got quite a few tins of Kiwi shoe wax already, and I'm looking for shoe cream now. Can anyone who used AE cream before give some comments? Thanks!
     
  6. jhcam8

    jhcam8 Senior member

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    Thanks for your suggestion, but I've got quite a few tins of Kiwi shoe wax already, and I'm looking for shoe cream now. Can anyone who used AE cream before give some comments? Thanks!

    I've used this and it seems to be fine. Having the applicator in the cap is handy. Creams won't give the nice glaze, but are fine for brushing out.

    Just for the heck of it I ordered some Tricker's cream and C&J wax to try. Anyone use these?
     
  7. Golf_Nerd

    Golf_Nerd Senior member

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    Does anyone know where to purchase them?


    On internet?
     
  8. ziggyosk

    ziggyosk Senior member

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    I've used this and it seems to be fine. Having the applicator in the cap is handy. Creams won't give the nice glaze, but are fine for brushing out. Just for the heck of it I ordered some Tricker's cream and C&J wax to try. Anyone use these?
    I use C&J wax, I think it works great. It's nice and smooth and leaves a good shine.
     
  9. jhcam8

    jhcam8 Senior member

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    I use C&J wax, I think it works great. It's nice and smooth and leaves a good shine.
    \\

    Thanks, zig - good to know.
    I sent you a pm about your new shoes and have a further update if you want to pm me. JH
     
  10. audiophilia

    audiophilia Senior member

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    Totally, with the AE polishes. Live by them....
     
  11. Douglas

    Douglas Senior member

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    Threads like this remind me of why StyleForum is so f***ing fantastic. Thanks to all who have contributed so meaningfully to this thread. I have learned a ton.
     
  12. jhcam8

    jhcam8 Senior member

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    Threads like this remind me of why StyleForum is so f***ing fantastic. Thanks to all who have contributed so meaningfully to this thread. I have learned a ton.

    Lesser members are, no doubt, most eager to take whatever crumb learned SF Seniors are willing to drop in their generous labors to guide the unsophisticated in proper thread contribution. One, for example, might foolishly surmise that a discussion of shoe polish was germane to a thread entitled: Shoe care supply checklist! [​IMG]
     
  13. ziggyosk

    ziggyosk Senior member

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    I have some questions for all the pros.....

    1. what do you shine your shoes on? I've been laying down some newspaper on the kitchen counter and it's a real pain. my shoes flop all over the place, especially when I buff them at the end. I have to hang the toe off the edge of the counter and have someone else hold them down.

    2. Do you use shine boxes? if so how do they work, can I use them by myself and not have a problem? by looking at pictures of them it doesn't seem like they will stay on the pedistal if I go to buff them.

    3. and do you leave your trees in your shoes when shining?
     
  14. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    I take the trees out and put my hand in the shoe. I sit on the floor and use an old bath towel (rather than newspaper).
     
  15. Lear

    Lear Senior member

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    Mar 17, 2007
    I deal with my shoes while I'm still wearing my sweaty, dirty gym clothing.

    Switch the TV on and put an old blanket across the armchair.

    Get comfy, shoes in lap and shine away.

    I only use a brush to get the initial dirt off and a very quick shine. Then it's cotton balls all the way; for as close to a mirror shine as I can get. I still have a way to go to match some here [​IMG]

    I could never get the hang of the cotton cloth coiled around the finger. I always seemed to get a rough edge gouging into the wax.

    I've learnt a LOT about shoe shining/care from reading this forum.
     
  16. ViND

    ViND New Member

    Messages:
    1
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    Aug 6, 2008
    Being new to this shoe care process, I have some beginner questions that are probably ridiculous!

    First, should I remove the shoe laces before starting the whole process? It seems like I would want to avoid getting stuff on them and work on the tongue of the shoe.

    Also, Rider's recommendations seem more exhaustive than other resources I've read. Would people recommend it for every time I polish, or just once in a while?

    Finally, any common pitfalls for the newbie?!

    Thanks to everyone! This thread has been extremely helpful.
     
  17. lomomagix

    lomomagix New Member

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    After browsing the internet for several months for tips on the shoe care process, I finally found one that is actually helpful! Detailed and exhaustive, yes, but worth every word that you read! Rider's post is probably the most useful 3-year old post in any forum, of any topic, in the whole WWW. It was so nice that it actually prompted me to step out of being just a lurker! Thanks to this forum!

    Now, my question: if I have several different shades of brown creams (all dark, but slightly different from each other), how necessary is it to have a separate shoe brush for each one of them? Not that the prices of shoe brushes are very prohibitive, it's the space they will occupy that is my concern.
     
  18. lomomagix

    lomomagix New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2008
    Location:
    US of A
    I have some questions for all the pros.....

    1. what do you shine your shoes on? I've been laying down some newspaper on the kitchen counter and it's a real pain. my shoes flop all over the place, especially when I buff them at the end. I have to hang the toe off the edge of the counter and have someone else hold them down.

    2. Do you use shine boxes? if so how do they work, can I use them by myself and not have a problem? by looking at pictures of them it doesn't seem like they will stay on the pedistal if I go to buff them.

    3. and do you leave your trees in your shoes when shining?


    How about that Grip-N-Shine contraption from shoeshinekit.com? Or even the Shine Butler? Anybody with experience using those? Are they really helpful?
     
  19. mkarim

    mkarim Senior member

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    Sep 24, 2008
    How is Lincoln polish?
     
  20. DoubleDomer

    DoubleDomer Senior member

    Messages:
    101
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    Oct 5, 2008
    Location:
    East Coast, USA
    PSA: STP has some cedar shoe trees on sale. They're seconds but I think they'll do the job for most entry-level SFers like myself. I picked up six pairs for 11.44 each (had an additional 25% discount).

    Just use the STP jump page and search for Woodlore Cedar Shoe Trees.
     

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