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Shirts with patterns on inside of collar and cuffs

bjswifty

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I recently have had the liking of shirts with contrasting patterns (floral, pasley, ect) on the inside of the collars and cuffs for dress shirts. Brands I have been purchasing include English Laundry, and Bugatchai, and Burberry. I wear these to work with a tie and the cuffs buttoned so they do not show the pattern, but on the weekends or on Fridays (no tie day) I wear it with top button unbuttoned and the cuffs flipped back to show off the pattern..

I am curious to what other people think of these types of shirts, and if there is a proper way to wear them to show off the inside of the cuff. More specifically, I am talking about either keeping it unbuttoned and flipped back, or flipped back and buttoned, which I see displayed in the department stores.. This makes the cuff obviously very tight, and since it is flipped back, it sinches up the arm.. One of my Bugatchai shirts is convertible cuffed, so it has an extra button hole to put a cuff link on...

I know this is most likely personal preference, but I'd like to hear about how others treat these types of shirts, either leave them on the shelf, or flaunt the colors and patterns.

Oh, also a couple of the English Laundry shirts with patterns on the cuffs are french cuffs, and you can't flip them back to show the pattern, but I do like how the manufacturer has one of the corners stitched back to display it.. I wear these on the weekends with jeans un-tucked and unbuttoned and no tie, or with a tie/suit to work...

Ok, thanks!

bjswifty
 

bmf895

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Originally Posted by gladhands
I think they can work as "party shirts", but they run the risk of coming off a little douchey.

+1

If you're going to do it anyway, keep it subtle. Stay away from loud and highly contrasting fabrics.
 

bjswifty

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Yes you are right, one I would never wear to work because of just the flamboyant colors, checkered all over the shirt with an almost shiny look to it (the shirt is also made of some pajama type material and looks almost like a robe, haha)... But, I do have a couple which look like ordinary dress shirts, such as all white with woven vertical stripe texture, or white with solid blue vertical stripes.. the white one with a silver lining on the inside with black checkers, and the blue stripe has dark navy lining.. The burberry of course is solid white with the nova check on the inside..
 

MalfordOfLondon

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Not my thing personally but Paul Smith does this with most of their french cuff shirts.
 

Shirtmaven

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I am so over that look.
I have been doing these for over 15 years. yes. this is not a new trend

in another year you will be tired of these robert Graham/rufus etc shirts with weiord colored buttonholes.
 

George

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I have several shirts done like that, It's certainly not new amongst shirtmakers. On my shirts, for example, if the shirt was stripes the shirtmaker would line the inside of the collar and cuffs with the check version of the cloth. Most of my shirts are made from Acorn fabric who tend to do both striped and checked versions of the 'same' colourway wise cloth.

I think about it the same way I think about suit coat linings. Plus, the fact that few will ever see it.

RTW seem to have appropiated it, but so what?
 

Douglas

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Do it. Do it loud.

Improves the odds for the rest of us.
 

ljrcustom

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TRINI

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How is this any different from Rubinacci lining their jackets with tie-silk?
 

TheFoo

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Originally Posted by TRINI
How is this any different from Rubinacci lining their jackets with tie-silk?
Under no circumstances would you see the lining of a jacket while it's worn. It's a more genuinely personal choice. Different fabrics under your shirt cuff and collar are specifically intended to be shown. Also, you need to have a different fabric lining your jacket than the one that makes up it's exterior, anyway. That said, I'm not hugely enthusiastic about overly expressive jacket linings myself. I prefer plain, solid colors.
 

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