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Shirtmaking as a hobby - is it viable?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by chobochobo, Apr 4, 2007.

  1. instar

    instar Member

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    For those interested in the process, here's a link to a webcast showing how to make a man's shirt step-by-step.

    http://www.expertvillage.com/videos/...asic-tools.htm

    It's pretty basic, but clear. (On thing: Stephanie's expertise aside, I don't advocate sewing a seam without removing the pins as you go.)
     
  2. j

    j Senior member Admin

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    Wow, great link. Thanks.
     
  3. rssmsvc

    rssmsvc Senior member

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    Many fabric shops have sewing classes or continuing ED or colleges. Instruction to sewing a shirt could easily be found in most cities.

    I took a continuing ed class when I was 18 and made a navy blue with white windowpane, very fine wale corduroy shirt.


    I find what you do incredibly interesting, at that point had you any previous tailoring experience ?
     
  4. Despos

    Despos Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I find what you do incredibly interesting, at that point had you any previous tailoring experience ?

    I had begun working in my fathers tailor shop. Had about 6 months of sewing experience. You start out just learning to use a needle and thimble. I don't know why I took that class except I was always looking to learn, anywhere or from anyone I could. Any experience or exposure is good.
     
  5. chobochobo

    chobochobo Senior member Moderator

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    This is encouraging. So with an infinite number of monkeys with an infinite number of sewing machines, we'd get a Kabbaz shirt yet.
     
  6. chobochobo

    chobochobo Senior member Moderator

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    GOOD buttonhole foot are essential.
    Buy a 1/4" edgestitch foot for your machine. They're cheap and worth their weight in gold for shirtmaking.


    seriously though, thanks for the useful post, but what are a buttonhole foot and a edgestitch foot - what do they look like and what do they do? [​IMG] I am a complete newbie with sewing machines, I probably used one for all of an hour twenty years ago.
     
  7. instar

    instar Member

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    seriously though, thanks for the useful post, but what are a buttonhole foot and a edgestitch foot - what do they look like and what do they do? [​IMG] I am a complete newbie with sewing machines, I probably used one for all of an hour twenty years ago.

    In a nutshell, a buttonhole foot makes buttonhole construction much easier. If the link works, here's a picture of one:
    http://cgi.ebay.com/New-Home-Janome-...QQcmdZViewItem

    Essentially you drop in whatever sized button you're going to use on the shirt and the gadget makes a buttonhole to fit. On the newer machines, it's all pretty much automatic. I'm using a Kenmore 19110 right now and it makes a great buttonhole.

    The edgestitch foot is a presser foot that has a metal guide on one side exactly 1/4" from the needle. You keep your fabric against the guide when you're edgestiching and it keeps your seams nice and neat and the same distance from the edge all way around.

    There is also a shirt hem foot that aumatically rolls and stitches the hem at the bottom. Personally, I bind my hems with silk tape handstitched to the back, but a rolled hem is quicker and easier.

    Hope this helps. Believe me, once you start working with a sewing machine, it'll all be very straight forward. It took me longer to type this than it'll take you to get used to using the machine. [​IMG]

    Instar
     
  8. GlenCoe

    GlenCoe Senior member

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    I find this thread very motivational [​IMG]
    Could someone in a nutshell explain the basic process of pattern making? For a beginner, obviously. I always thought the easiest way would be to dissect some well fitting shirt and then take those parts and make patterns out of them.
     
  9. columbia92

    columbia92 Well-Known Member

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    I got interested in shirtmaking due to my experience in buying MTM shirts. I think pattern making is the process of just drawing out the pattern on a piece of fabric so that you can just cut the fabric out and sew it together to make shirts or clothe. You can take the shirts apart and make pattern out of them but then you also have to learn to lay them out correctly on the fabric because if you don't line up the fabric correctly, the check or the stripe won't match when you sew the fabric together. You also need to know if you want to increase certain size at specific locations, which other part you also need to modify as well. My question is, even if I can take apart my clothe and lay out the patterns on a fabric, where can I buy all the fabric I need or the accessories such as buttons, thread and so forth??
     
  10. GlenCoe

    GlenCoe Senior member

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    I got interested in shirtmaking due to my experience in buying MTM shirts. I think pattern making is the process of just drawing out the pattern on a piece of fabric so that you can just cut the fabric out and sew it together to make shirts or clothe. You can take the shirts apart and make pattern out of them but then you also have to learn to lay them out correctly on the fabric because if you don't line up the fabric correctly, the check or the stripe won't match when you sew the fabric together. You also need to know if you want to increase certain size at specific locations, which other part you also need to modify as well. My question is, even if I can take apart my clothe and lay out the patterns on a fabric, where can I buy all the fabric I need or the accessories such as buttons, thread and so forth??

    depends where you live, I've been doing some research for online shops and so far the best I found is this

    http://www.macculloch-wallis.co.uk/Default.aspx
     
  11. Acephale

    Acephale Senior member

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    Barren Isle
    Not a lot to add to this grate threak. . . practice and patience. . . and enjoy all the frustrations of thread (the stuff that comes on spoils - erm maybe I am understanding interwebs speak at long last) breaking, needle threading, clogged erm what are the bottom thread spoils called... pricked fingers... sewn nails... and tension. . .

    Oh and iron every seam after stitching. . . and you will need a sleave ham (like a mini pillow) for the curvy bits...

    Have fun. And enjoy. My Father eventually learnt to make seat covers for 1950's Matchless' whilst wearing Van Heusen shirts so maybe it is a case of picking poison.

    Quilting anyones?
     
    1 person likes this.
  12. Mannix

    Mannix Senior member

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    Denver, CO
    I'm taking a sewing construction class in college currently (it's required for my major) and I plan on making my own shirts and eventually my own sport coats and suits after I take the advanced sewing class. I was talking to my professor the other day and she teaches how to make sport coats in her advanced sewing class, but she teaches it the industry method which is fused.[​IMG]

    She then said she could show me how to make fully canvassed jackets outside of class if I wanted. [​IMG] I am looking forward to the prospect of tailoring my own clothing, it should be a fun hobby.
     

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