shirt laundering

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by rich, Mar 31, 2006.

  1. rich

    rich Member

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    hey everyone...looking for any tips. i am planning to start washing my shirts since I have some better ones now thanks to reading this forum...

    I read the kabbaz site on washing but don't have the time for all that.
    1. Is a cap full of Woolite good enough to add to shirts?
    2. What is the optimal number of shirts in the load?
    3. Should I just hang them on a hangar until near dry(I don't have a clothesline).

    Thanks all...
     
  2. Pink22m

    Pink22m Senior member

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    I wouldn't recommend Woolite, since I heard that it isn't that gentle on fabrics, although I think much of that criticism comes from its effects on elastic waistbands. Nevertheless, I stopped using it myself, and now use a very gentle detergent called Forever New, which is available in the lingerie department at any Nordstrom.

    To answer your question about optical number of shirts per load, I typically have 3 to 5 dress shirts per load, and set the washing machine water on medium for water level. I set the water temperature to warm, and use the gentle cycle. Make sure you remove all collar stays inside the shirts, and unbotton all buttons, including the gauntlet buttons, if applicable.

    When hanging, you should always use plastic hangers, although often I do not seem to have enough available, and I will resort to using some wood ones that I purchased at Target. Supposedly wood can leave a stain, but I have never had a problem with it doing so. Otherwise, if I have enough plastic hangers available, I use them first. It usually takes my shirts less than 24 hours to dry, and by the next day, they are ready to be hand ironed.
     
  3. lcordaro

    lcordaro Active Member

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    If you launder the shirt and let it dry naturally will that prevent any shrinkage. If there is shrinkage would dry cleaning it be better for the shirt as it relates directly to shrinkage. I hope I am stating this correctly

    Thanks
    Lcordaro
     
  4. pgoat

    pgoat Senior member

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    I like to iron while the shirt is still a bit damp - I find that the bag method works better than hanging to keep the wet distributed evenly. (when hung, the collar and shoulders dry quickly but the sleeves, cuffs, etc stay wet.)

    I've started hanging the shirts for a few hours to let the major water evaporate, then put them in a plastic bag overnight and iron the next day.
     
  5. uslexus

    uslexus Member

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    I would not recommend ironing when they are still damp. I once read, by a custom shirt maker, that ironing when still damp, especially the collar and cuffs can cook the fabric and this is of course not good. Although if I am in a hurry, I do it.
     
  6. Dmax

    Dmax Senior member

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    1. Your washer capacity and type will determine the ammount of shirts and detergent to use. Side loading washers typically need less detergent per load than top loaders. The couple of times I tried woolite it did not rinse out well without additional rinse cycle so I generally use plain Tide or Dreft which is marketed as not to leave any residue.
    2. Again depends on your machine's capacity. I probably load up 14-16 shirts in my Kenmore HE3T.
    3. My machine on medium spin setting produces shirt which are just damp. I usually hang them up to dry on wooden hangers overnight. I can't stomach ironing several shirts in the row and only iron 1 or 2 shirts everyday.

    Dimitry
     
  7. rich

    rich Member

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    thanks guys...now I have to go buy some plastic hangars!
     
  8. rich

    rich Member

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    Is tide safe to use on shirts? It doesn't have bleach, does it? Are we talking about the liquid tide? I don't think my machine has a loader...
     
  9. Renault78law

    Renault78law Senior member

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    tide is fine. the danger of using too little detergent is that your shirts won't be as clean. the danger of using too much detergent is that it won't rinse out completely, casting a yellowish tinge on your whites. try an additional rinse if you have the time and can swing the utility bill. same for presoaking. you should always pretreat stains and go over any ring-around-the-whatever with a nailbrush.

    It's far easier to iron when you shirts are still slightly damp. I typically hang dry my shirts on plastic suit hangers (the ones with wide shoulders). If you can't get to them immediately, I think wrapping them with a towel is preferable to putting them in a bag, but that's just me.
     
  10. rich

    rich Member

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    Is it better to use liquid detergent?
     
  11. pgoat

    pgoat Senior member

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    I would not recommend ironing when they are still damp. I once read, by a custom shirt maker, that ironing when still damp, especially the collar and cuffs can cook the fabric and this is of course not good. Although if I am in a hurry, I do it.

    I meant slightly damp; good point!
     

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