Shirt Collars - Fused or Unfused?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Grammaton Cleric, Jul 16, 2010.

  1. mafoofan

    mafoofan THE FOO Dubiously Honored

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    I think every Good shirtmaker not only in Naples will give you options.
    I have never been to Naples but I try to accomodate
    Freddy Vandecasteele


    The "formal" white shirt my Neapolitan shirtmaker made for me has a fused collar, but none of my other shirts from her do. My point is not that you can't get a fused called from a shirtmaker in Naples, but that fused collars are not typical of the archetypical Neapolitan shirt.
     
  2. Professor Chaos

    Professor Chaos Senior member

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    I think a lot of people prefer sewn-in interfacing just because it's rarely used in ready-to-wear shirts. If you want a neat-looking collar, that stays neat, that's easy to keep neat after laundering, etc., stick with fusing. If you want an imperfect look, a little puckering at the seams, etc., or an extremely soft collar, then you should avoid it. But thinking sewn-in interfacing is superior because most people don't use it seems silly to me.
    +1 I would say that it's not just silly, it's pretentious.
     
  3. Frodo

    Frodo Senior member

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    A non-fused shirt will last as long as the fabric holds together, and can look good even if it's threadbare. A fused shirt basically lasts until the fusing fails, at which point it looks pretty lousy.
     
  4. Orphan

    Orphan Member

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    I actually prefer fused, this does seem to become an issue with cheaper shirts - I guess they use lesser adhesive or something but a couple of my cheaper fused collar shirts (OTR) have lost the fuse and the collar is terrible now, however my good shirts (made to measure) with a fused collar the collar is as crisp and defined as the day I got it. I can't stand a floppy/messy collar on work/dess shirts though unfused are fine with casual gear where a really crisp defined collar can look overdone. A cheap fused collar can be bad but when it comes to quality shirts fused/unfused is personal opinion and shirt use rather than one being higher quality than the other.
     
  5. James Perry

    James Perry New Member

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    There are several different weights of fusing. A fine shirt should be hand fused via a dry iron, this melts the glue better than using a heavy press method which can also dis-color the fusing.
    Where it puckers this shows where the glue has not melted properly into the cotton. You can use a 3 fold collar top in either 2 self and one plain color that will best match the top collar fabric. This allows for the fusing to be attached to the 3rd layer of top collar thus reducing the effects of any puckering to the top layer of the collar top.
     
  6. Axel Ferguson

    Axel Ferguson Senior member

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    Fused is preferable for me as I almost never wear a tie and a fused collar just looks neater while unbuttoned.
     
  7. bjornb17

    bjornb17 Senior member

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    i don't mind the fused collar, is rigid enough to hold itself in place when not wearing tie.
     
  8. andreyb2

    andreyb2 Senior member

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  9. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Non-fused take more time to iron for sure, but I kind of think that the bit of puckering and such caused by subtle shrinkage at the seams is charming and more relaxed looking.
     
  10. bloke11

    bloke11 Well-Known Member

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    Anyone tried separating the fusing from the fabric? I've actually done that before and now it feels very much like a soft, unfused collar.
     
  11. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    It's quite possible that you ruined your shirt.

    I much rather wear a soft collar, they're just more comfortable and it's easier to turn your collar down after knotting your tie.
     
  12. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I always turn my collar down before buttoning the top button as to not bend the whole collar as much.
     
  13. spitfirees20

    spitfirees20 Senior member

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    Anyone tried separating the fusing from the fabric? I've actually done that before and now it feels very much like a soft, unfused collar.

    I hope this is a joke.
     
  14. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    I always turn my collar down before buttoning the top button as to not bend the whole collar as much.

    I dont.
     
  15. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

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    Interfaced collars tend to feel stiffer because of the glue, but you wouldn't get rid of it by separating the shell fabric from the interfacing. So I don't see how that would make the collar any softer.

    As someone said above, fusible and sew-in interfacings come in lots of weights and stiffnesses. Just because it's sew-in doesn't mean it'll be soft (and vice versa).
     

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