Shirt Armholes

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by DSM, Feb 22, 2005.

  1. DSM

    DSM Active Member

    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2004
    I recently recieved a MTM shirt from Hong Kong--and am overall fairly happy with it. But the armholes, while fitting snuggly up in my armpits (very comfotably), are showing my perspiration (I don't wear an undershirt). So what are my options here? - either wear an undershirt or lower the armoles? But if I lower the armholes, won't itl change the overall look/feel of the shirt?
     
  2. Luc-Emmanuel

    Luc-Emmanuel Senior member

    Messages:
    1,586
    Likes Received:
    13
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2005
    Location:
    Paris, France
    don't show your armpits. [​IMG] .luc
     
  3. Carlo

    Carlo Senior member

    Messages:
    1,027
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2003
    I don't think you can lower the armholes, perhaps in future shirts.

    Meanwhile.. perhaps a better question would be which anti-perspirants people have had the most success with. Any heavy sweaters out there???

    An undershirt sounds like a good option. I used to hate them but there are some nearly seamless ones out there from Swiss and Italian producers that solve the comfort issue and will make you look better.
     
  4. Tyto

    Tyto Senior member

    Messages:
    386
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2004
    Location:
    SoCal
    My father is a *heavy* sweater and swears by Mitchum roll-on. I'm not in his league, but I overheat easily and I find that the "clear" antipersperants work fine--I use Gillette.

    In the end, though, the undershirt is probably the better option in terms of protecting your MTM investment. I simply buy CK undershirts at TJ Maxx and similar spots ($7-$9 for three), and I've never had comfort issues with them. Do you find undershirts uncomfortable in terms of their substance (seams, labels, etc.), or do you just dislike the extra layer?
     
  5. DSM

    DSM Active Member

    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2004
    I'm thinking in terms of future shirts I order--I suppose I'll have to have the armhole lowered--I'm just worried that it will effect the "Sillhoutte" of the shirt.
     
  6. Alexander Kabbaz

    Alexander Kabbaz Senior member

    Messages:
    1,272
    Likes Received:
    5
    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2003
    Location:
    East Hampton & New York
    Zimmerli - Business Class and Pureness - are designed to control that. They are made with certain odor blockers which reduce the problem greatly and are sufficiently thin so as not to interfere with the fit of your shirt. Non of the other Zimmerli models have that 'blocking' feature. There are probably other brands which feature the same thing, but this is the only one I have familiarity with. Excuse the advertisement, please.
     
  7. FIHTies

    FIHTies Senior member Affiliate Vendor

    Messages:
    2,959
    Likes Received:
    4
    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2004
    Location:
    Back and Better Than Before
    NM [​IMG]
     
  8. Alexander Kabbaz

    Alexander Kabbaz Senior member

    Messages:
    1,272
    Likes Received:
    5
    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2003
    Location:
    East Hampton & New York
    Now that I have a break between cutting linen Summer shirts ... regarding your high armhole: The simplest equation is the higher - the better. That should be the goal of every shirtmaker. After you get used to not wearing a RTW tent, you should begin to find the higher armhole more confortable. If it is too high, naturally, it will cut into your underarm. You'll know it easily from the red marks and dripping blood at the end of the day. If this transpires, ask the shirtmaker to lower it 1/2". If you just feel a bit of discomfort, the ask for 1/4" lower. With each progressive shirt, go 1/4" lower yet until you achieve the balance between no underarm discomfort and as high as it can remain. You'll notice, when you raise your arm out to the side, the shirt will tend to stay in place much better than with the old, low armhole RTW. There are a myriad of other fitting enhancements which are a direct result of the higher armhole ... but the next linen calls. Feel free to ask any specific questions in this regard. P.S.: Sorry, FIHT and others, but humor in the area you broached is gone. Finis.
     
  9. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    41,568
    Likes Received:
    2,807
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2002
    Location:
    In Hiding
    Keep in mind another thing: a lower armhole to the shirt can make the shirtsleeve seem shorter than it really is when you wear your jacket. If the jacket's armhole is higher than the shirt armhole, then the jacket will "pull" the shirtsleeve up, and you may not show as much shirtcuff as you want to show under your jacket sleeve.
     
  10. faustian bargain

    faustian bargain Senior member

    Messages:
    2,523
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2004
    Location:
    Bay Area
    i have a question about armscye width. what considerations are there? on my first pass at a test pattern (for myself), which i am currently working on in humble fits and starts, i noticed that i seem to have placed the armscye front too far 'out', such that there was a bunch of fabric hanging between the chest and shoulder. i widened the arc of the armscye, and brought the curve up a bit under the arm as well. it seemed to help. i'm wondering what you look at when you set out to make that curve around the shoulder? for example, at the yoke/sleeve connection, i can see a natural break at the shoulder's curve which tells me where the seam should be. however, it's a little harder to find that place once you get down to the 'chestal region'. i guess the question is, how to incorporate a bit of ease for front-back movement, while at the same time keeping a nice non-blousey fit. meanwhile i'm having fun learning about how shirts go together. /andrew
     
  11. DSM

    DSM Active Member

    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2004
    Just to further elaborate: I am not a heavy sweater--actually I sweat very liitle (say average). But the armhole fits so well/snug that even a small amount of perspiration shows through (i.e., my shirt is a medium blueon solid colors). For example, if I extend my arm straight up towards the cieling, the fabric will rub up against my armpit and hence pick up any perspiration lingering there.
     
  12. Alexander Kabbaz

    Alexander Kabbaz Senior member

    Messages:
    1,272
    Likes Received:
    5
    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2003
    Location:
    East Hampton & New York
    put it in the sleeve
     
  13. faustian bargain

    faustian bargain Senior member

    Messages:
    2,523
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2004
    Location:
    Bay Area
    i vote for Mitchum brand, i use the gel. just let it dry enough before you put your shirt on. there are stronger antiperspirants on the market, but not as widely available, and besides i'm scared of anything stronger than mitchum.

    also i vote for wearing a t-shirt.

    in the hot summertime, i vote for wearing a fabric that doesn't show sweat very well.

    /andrew - voting early, voting often.
     
  14. faustian bargain

    faustian bargain Senior member

    Messages:
    2,523
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2004
    Location:
    Bay Area
    how to incorporate a bit of ease for front-back movement
    put it in the sleeve
    sweet. hunch confirmed. [​IMG]
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by