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Sherry Tweed

OlSarge

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Well put. Now from my standpoint I can't imaging wearing a tweed jacket to a upscale restaurant or to work in an office under any circumstances. Those activities, IMO, call for a blazer or possibly a worsted odd jacket. One might even get away with a Donegal tweed but not the herringbone/windowpane/tartan sort. Though the 'no brown in town' concept is long, long dead, tweed is still a material for comfort, not impressing people. It's the gentleman's public answer to a robe and pyjamas at home.
 

JLibourel

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Oh for heaven's sake, Sarge, I can think of exactly one restaurant in our area--the Sky Room in Long Beach--where I categorically would not wear tweed! There might be a couple of others where I might feel a trifle diffident about it, but maybe not.

As to work in an office, In any office I worked in over the 36 years of my career that I worked in offices, I certainly would have been perfectly well dressed in a tweed jacket, and in the latter part of my career I would have been incomparably better dressed than virtually all my fellow staffers when I wore tweed, and so I was, since I very frequently wore tweed in the cooler months.

For that matter, did you ever have an office job in your civilian career? I thought you taught school almost exclusively. In today's office environment (those that don't involve direct public contact, anyway), it's downright ridiculous to pontificate against tweed when most of your peers are running around in T-shirts with wolves or death's heads on them!
 

OlSarge

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For my sins I was a federal bureaucrat for eight miserable years. I don't want to talk about them. We plebeians wore polo shirts and slacks. Those with pretensions toward management wore drab grey suits and white shirts with dull striped ties. Before that I worked in a finance company. White shirt and tie, all the way. And I don't want to talk about that, either.

Never been to the Sky Room but whenever we go to 555 E. Ocean, I do the Calif. tux thing with either white turtleneck or OCBD. Tweeds I reserve for our local trattorie. Very appropriate in those kind of places. Try Musso's some time. I really recommend it.

But thanx for the tip on the Sky Room. After looking it up, I can see a Sunday brunch in our future some time next month. Art Deco, huh? Verrrrrrryyyyyyyy innnnnnnnnnnteresting!
 
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papertiger26

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I tend to agree with JLibourel. I feel the number of restaurants (even very good ones) that require, let alone expect business dress/worsteds are in the vast minority. In fact, tweed might be more appropriate with many restaurants' obsession with "farm-to-table." I am client facing most days, but this would be used sparingly/almost never with anything having to do with business. I am almost always in suit for work as I mentioned.

I am a bit surprised with the idea that 3 patches is inherently dooferish. I feel like it can be done well without looking like a slouch. I can understand the argument that it disrupts the balance, but even that seems like it's stretching the balance argument.
 

OlSarge

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Ah, a misunderstanding. It isn't that I'm concerned about what the restaurant might or might not expect. As Jan pointed out, this is SoCal where "Kazual 'R' Us" and cargo shorts are considered appropriate for funerals. It's what I expect from myself, in this case. And BTW, JLibourel is about the snappiest dresser I personally know. He would never allow himself to be seen in public in shorts and a tee shirt.
 

papertiger26

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Understood, and agreed. I think most people here take some amount of pride in the way they dress and have certain expectations to be met. Otherwise they would not be on here presumably. I also think that as long as something does not look affected, cartoonish or out of place, having a nicely cut jacket in a quality fabric will make the wearer better turned out than the vast majority of men despite possibly being more informal.
 

JLibourel

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Ah, a misunderstanding.  It isn't that I'm concerned about what the restaurant might or might not expect.  As Jan pointed out, this is SoCal where "Kazual 'R' Us" and cargo shorts are considered appropriate for funerals.  It's what I expect from myself, in this case.  And BTW, JLibourel is about the snappiest dresser I personally know.  He would never allow himself to be seen in public in shorts and a tee shirt.  


Thanks so much for the kind words. One of my neighbors professed to be shocked when she caught me watering in my front yard while wearing a T-shirt a few years ago.

As to the business of patch vs. welted pockets, I think that's a matter of personal taste. Patch pockets are certainly not a sine qua non of the tweed jacket. I was looking over a book full of photos of aristocratic British game shoots during the golden age of such things (1870-1914), and the vast majority of the tweed jackets have welted pockets. As on any jacket, patch pockets make it more casual. Of my seven tweed jackets, only one has patch pockets. This is a Porter & Harding Harris tweed. During less than three years it has frayed and pilled into the classic "hairy monster" stereotype tweed jacket. It is the only garment from W.W. Chan that I use as a beater. Ironically, it sees more use than any of my other Chan garments since I wear it with great frequency while walking the dog in chilly weather.

Of course, in the real world, I just wonder how many people are really even going to notice whether a man's jacket has patch or welted pockets!
 
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OlSarge

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Watering the lawn is a perfect reason for a tee shirt. So is pulling weeds. However, years and years ago when I was stationed at the now-closed Ft. Ord, my wife and I took our young selves to Carmel-by-the-Sea to wander around. The thing I remember most was the disheartening sight of a distinguished looking gentleman pruning his roses, gardening you understand, in a tweed jacket that I am sure was worth more than my entire wardrobe of the time. Of course, this was Carmel . . .

And you know? I don't remember whether the pockets were patch or welted.
wink.gif
 

papertiger26

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I can definitively say there will be no gardening in this jacket. I tend to agree that most people won't notice the pocket choice, and I will likely go with whatever I am feeling at the time I request the commission. I appreciate all the help and the interesting discussion. I am actually surprised that two of the biggest contributors were from SoCal. Having been in that locale often enough, I am surprised tweed gets has so much utility in that climate.
 

JLibourel

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You'd be surprised how useful a lighter tweed like those in the Sherry Tweed collection can be in Southern California. It can be worn on many days (or especially in the evenings) from October through June. I was wearing one of my 12-ounce Sherry Tweeds on the eve of the Fourth of July. Sure wouldn't want to wear one right now!
 

OlSarge

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Jan's got that right. Lightweight tweed, especially the softer blends, are a delight in SoCal once the seasons turn. The wind off the ocean, the fog in the morning, the sudden drop in temperature once the sun goes down (which makes this the best cymbidium orchid climate on Earth) all make a 11-12 oz soft woolen just the bee's knees to wear. Even 14 oz isn't too heavy a lot of the time.
 

JonathanCWalker

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I was planning on getting a cold weather alternative to my navy hopsack blazer, a fairly subdued plain or herringbone blue tweed. I have a brown tweed with a rust and orange overcheck and a traditional brown/tan houndstooth as my current fall/winter jackets. I figured a blue would round out my sportcoats nicely. However, the grey with blue guarded windowpane in the Sherry Tweed book caught my eye as something more interesting. I only wish the windowpane was a darker blue.

I primarily wear suits for work, and the jackets are used for casual dinners and weekends. What are your thoughts on whether a subdued blue's utilitty outweighs the more interesting (to my mind) grey with blue overcheck? I have provided a link to the fabric in question below (#4).

http://www.hollandandsherry.com/apparel/collections.aspx?season=AW2011&details=HS1188

Thanks for your help.
Great looking fabrics but also very light and could wear through. Also another good book to look at is the Porter and Harding Glenroyal bunch
 

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