Sherlock Holmes?

Discussion in 'Entertainment, Culture, and Sports' started by JLibourel, Dec 22, 2009.

  1. javyn

    javyn Senior member

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    Looks incredibly stupid. I haven't ever, and probably will never watch a Sherlock Holmes movie. The books are so special too me I'm terrified a film may ruin it.
     


  2. RyJ Maduro

    RyJ Maduro Senior member

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    Is it just me, or is this threak a study in this board's latent (or not so latent) Anglophilia?

    Would everyone be this up in arms if the tale being butchered was, say, the Epic of Gilgamesh? The story of the Battle of Thermopylae?

    For what it's worth, I think this Holmes film looks like a bloody travesty.
     


  3. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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    Jeremy Brett FTW
    Brett was undeniably great as he brought mischievousness to Holmes but Rathbone was . . . well, Rathbone. For more on him see my sword fight threap. lefty
     


  4. Pezzaturra

    Pezzaturra Senior member

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    It looks like utter garbage to me. I'll pass.

    +1
     


  5. Teacher

    Teacher Senior member

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    Is it just me, or is this threak a study in this board's latent (or not so latent) Anglophilia?

    Would everyone be this up in arms if the tale being butchered was, say, the Epic of Gilgamesh? The story of the Battle of Thermopylae?
    .


    No, because those stories are not nearly as widely read and reproduced in various media. The Holmes stories, while possibly waning in popularity right now, have been wildly popular for over a century. Now, if a movie were to butcher something like or Mark Twain, we'd be having the same discussion, country of origin notwithstanding.
     


  6. NorCal

    NorCal Senior member

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    Would everyone be this up in arms if the tale being butchered was, say, the Epic of Gilgamesh? The story of the Battle of Thermopylae?
    As I recall more than a few people were put off by 300. I can't speak for the rest of the board but the hollywoodization and bastardization of classic myths such as the Epic of Gilgamesh is rather aggravating.
     


  7. Teacher

    Teacher Senior member

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    As I recall more than a few people were put off by 300. I can't speak for the rest of the board but the hollywoodization and bastardization of classic myths such as the Epic of Gilgamesh is rather aggravating.

    I never really mind it, actually. Whether it's a movie based on history or a novel, I never go in with the expectation that it'll stick right with the original. I'm impressed when it does and still delivers a good movie (Apollo 13, for example), but movies are entertainment, period. A couple of good examples for me would be Bridge on the River Kwai and Gangs of New York: both inaccurate as hell but still good movies. I also don't at all mind it when moviemakers reinterpret literature, and I even quite like some of these movies (Starship Troopers was nothing like the book, and it wasn't a GREAT movie, but it was fun). However, I just don't like it when they take something I like very much and turn it into a steaming pile of suck.
     


  8. NorCal

    NorCal Senior member

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    I guess I'm with you there. I don't mind if a story is reinterpreted or used as inspiration as long as the movie is good. I can't stand when a classic idea or character is just turned upside down and loses all of the feeling of the original. That's when I have to wonder why they even bothered to have source material to begin with. If you are going to use Thor as a character, make him a damn thunder God or don't bother.

    A good example of a movie I thought was not really like the book in content but clearly inspired visually and in tone is Where the Wild Things Are. Really just an original piece of work only loosely based on the
    book but good enough that I didn't feel like Jonze had tried to destroy my childhood.

    An example of the Job done wrong would be the Wizard of Earth Sea sci-fi channel adaptation. Just a fucking insult to a good bit of fantasy. This Homes looks like it's in the same territory.
     


  9. tonylumpkin

    tonylumpkin Senior member

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    I just don't like it when they take something I like very much and turn it into a steaming pile of suck.

    What they did to John Irvings "A Prayer For Owen Meany" was criminal.
     


  10. Fuuma

    Fuuma Franchouillard Modasse

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    Is it just me, or is this threak a study in this board's latent (or not so latent) Anglophilia?

    Would everyone be this up in arms if the tale being butchered was, say, the Epic of Gilgamesh? The story of the Battle of Thermopylae?

    For what it's worth, I think this Holmes film looks like a bloody travesty.


    Dude, I used to love that stuff as a kid and there is no way to classify me as an Anglophile (hmm well, maybe musically see punk/post-punk but I also like US early NYC punkers so...).

    The TV series was good. I even like the Miyazaki animated version w. dogs. This movie looks like generic action crap.
     


  11. Pezzaturra

    Pezzaturra Senior member

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    Soviet Sherlok Holmes is the best.
    They showed it on PBS a few years back. Absolutely book-like with great score and costumes.
     


  12. JLibourel

    JLibourel Senior member

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    Just a few more thoughts on this thread:

    As far as Holmes' knowledge of martial arts goes, Holmes told Watson that he had used the Japanese art of baritsu to hurl Professor Moriarty into the chasm of the Reichenbach Falls. I just asked my colleague Dave Cater, editor of Inside Kung-Fu, if he had ever heard of a martial art called baritsu. He said he had not. In the movie, Dave informed me, Holmes states that he had been studying Wing Chun (a real martial art) for four years.

    I suspect "baritsu" may have been a figment of Doyle's creative imagination. Doyle was very free and easy about making up stuff like that. For example, the "swamp adder, the deadliest snake in India" in "The Speckled Band" is otherwise unknown although people have tried to identify it with the Russell's viper or the banded krait. Doyle obviously didn't know squat about snakes: You can't train a snake with a whistle, they're deaf, and they don't drink milk. The term "Penang lawyer" for a cane weighted with lead seems to have been made up by Doyle. In one of the stories, Dr. Watson mentions using a gun called a "tiger cub." Neither I nor yet my pal Garry James, who knows a great deal more than I do about British firearms of the Victorian era and is quite a Holmesian into the bargain, had ever heard of such a gun.

    For all the reverence paid to the Basil Rathbone/Nigel Bruce Holmes movies, bear in mind that in some ways they do more violence to the stories than the current movie. They yank Holmes and Watson out of the late Victorian era and plunk them down in the 1930s and '40s. In at least one of the movies, Holmes is fighting the cruel Nazis, with whom Professor Moriarty has allied himself. I can recall Holmes expressing his amazement to the evil professor that even he could stoop that low! Mind you, it has probably been about 57 years since I was watching those movies on TV!
     


  13. JLibourel

    JLibourel Senior member

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    The Valley of Fear is a really good SH story, well worth a read.

    ...In which Sherlock played virtually no role at all!
     


  14. Teacher

    Teacher Senior member

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    For all the reverence paid to the Basil Rathbone/Nigel Bruce Holmes movies, bear in mind that in some ways they do more violence to the stories than the current movie. They yank Holmes and Watson out of the late Victorian era and plunk them down in the 1930s and '40s. In at least one of the movies, Holmes is fighting the cruel Nazis, with whom Professor Moriarty has allied himself. I can recall Holmes expressing his amazement to the evil professor that even he could stoop that low! Mind you, it has probably been about 57 years since I was watching those movies on TV!


    My mom loves those movies and has tried practically my entire life to get me to love them, too. I just can't, for those reasons and just because I thought the acting was so stiff.
     


  15. gdc_2008

    gdc_2008 Senior member

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    I thought 300 was a bunch of crap as well. I forgot out The League of Whatever the Hell Was That Piece of Crap (OMFG)....so Holmes uses deductive reasoning to box? Ugh...
     


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