1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

SF Film/Cinema Thread

Discussion in 'Entertainment, Culture, and Sports' started by Manny Calavera, May 28, 2007.

  1. Manny Calavera

    Manny Calavera Senior member

    Messages:
    2,744
    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2006
    Location:
    New York
    Over 500 views and 38 posts!!?? Common people let's hear about films you like and why.

    I created this thread with the idea of me posting constantly, however I've been busy working on construction of a gallery these last few weeks. I still haven't read through all of your lists. [​IMG]
     
  2. Baron

    Baron Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    7,190
    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2004
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Fuuma - great films in your posts. I've seen and love enough of your choices that I've gone ahead and put several of the others you mention on my Netflix queue.

    A few recent films that I really loved:

    The New World, Terrence Mallick. This came and went in a flash. I saw the second version, which is apparently shorter than the first. I heard it benefited from the cuts. Amazing, beautiful, intelligent and moving film about the Jamestown colony and their interaction with the Powhantan Indians. I know a lot of people hated this film, but I was completetly taken with it. I wept more than once before it was over.

    The Lives of Others, Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck. I can't believe this was the work of a first time director. Masterfully told story about a Stasi officer and the artists he is surveilling, and the way surveillance effects all involved, especially the listener. Incredible performances all around. I was emotionally drained by the time is was over.
     
  3. Ivan Kipling

    Ivan Kipling Senior member

    Messages:
    2,114
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2006
    TOPKAPI: 1964
    Melina Mercouri, Maximilian Schell, Robert Morely, Peter Ustinov (Oscar for best supporting actor.)
    First rate thriller, showcasing jewelry heist inside an Istanbul museum. Perfectly cast, thoroughly engaging, witty, musical, fast paced. I mean, this one is excellent. Stunning location photography.
     
  4. countdemoney

    countdemoney Senior member

    Messages:
    3,911
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2005
    Location:
    USSA
    Tunes of Glory - Alec Guinness, John Mills. Directed by Ronald Neame. Guinness is fabulously brilliant. This was Guinness favorite movie that he made.

    One of my favorite scenes happens when a slightly intoxicated Guinness visits Kay Walsh in her dressing room.

    KW: Have you been drinking long?

    AG: (slurring) I have not been drinking long!

    KW: You've just been drinking all day.

    AG: How'd you know?

    KW: Your eyes . . .

    AG: Ahh mary, that's very romantic of you.

    The film is a wonderful study in two very diverse characters meeting. Guinness energy in his role is breathtaking. Dennis Price also provides a wonderfully cryptic performance. John Mills is always fascinating.
     
  5. Ivan Kipling

    Ivan Kipling Senior member

    Messages:
    2,114
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2006
    REPULSION, with Catherine Deneuve. Great thriller. [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  6. gdl203

    gdl203 Senior member Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

    Messages:
    36,649
    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2005
    Location:
    New York
    Repulsion is great. On a related note, why is it that I can never mention Polanski here in the USA without having to go through a lecture on how he is a monster (because of the statutory rape case 30 years ago). Some people seem so blinded by this one event that they cannot appreciate the fact that he is one of the most important filmmaker of the 20th century (Repulsion, Le Locataire, Cul-de-Sac, Rosemary's Baby, Chinatown, Bitter Moon, etc...)? Alright, he's also done his share of shitty films too (the Ninth Gate?...), but who hasn't? I can only think of Kubrick...
     
  7. Ivan Kipling

    Ivan Kipling Senior member

    Messages:
    2,114
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2006
    why is it that I can never mention Polanski here in the USA without having to go through a lecture on how he is a monster
    *********************************
    Yes, Repulsion is a terrific movie! Re. Roman Polanski, I don't know. I'd rather talk about Rosemary's Baby. One of my all time favorites. Love being inside the Dakota. [​IMG]
     
  8. Fuuma

    Fuuma Senior member

    Messages:
    25,818
    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2004
    Repulsion is great. On a related note, why is it that I can never mention Polanski here in the USA without having to go through a lecture on how he is a monster (because of the statutory rape case 30 years ago). Some people seem so blinded by this one event that they cannot appreciate the fact that he is one of the most important filmmaker of the 20th century (Repulsion, Le Locataire, Cul-de-Sac, Rosemary's Baby, Chinatown, Bitter Moon, etc...)? Alright, he's also done his share of shitty films too (the Ninth Gate?...), but who hasn't? I can only think of Kubrick...

    +1

    Repulsion and Chinatown are really really good. In fact I even enjoyed the ninth gate (not a great movie though + the book is infinitely better) and the Pianist was also masterfully directed.
     
  9. JBZ

    JBZ Senior member

    Messages:
    2,281
    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2003
    Repulsion was a good, creepy thriller (I remember citing it as an example in the "paranoia aesthetic" thread we had going awhile back). I absolutely love Chinatown, and rate amongst my favorites.

    I mostly enjoy thrillers and police procedurals. Some of my favorites have been A Touch of Evil, The French Connection, L.A. Confidential, The Maltese Falcon, the aforementioned Chinatown, True Confessions, One False Move, Narc, The Usual Suspects, and Se7en. I'm sure there are many others I'm leaving out.
     
  10. Fuuma

    Fuuma Senior member

    Messages:
    25,818
    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2004
    Repulsion was a good, creepy thriller (I remember citing it as an example in the "paranoia aesthetic" thread we had going awhile back). I absolutely love Chinatown, and rate amongst my favorites.

    I mostly enjoy thrillers and police procedurals. Some of my favorites have been A Touch of Evil, The French Connection, L.A. Confidential, The Maltest Falcon, the aforementioned Chinatown, True Confessions, One False Move, Narc, The Usual Suspects, and Se7en. I'm sure there are many others I'm leaving out.


    Narc is quite underrated, an excellent modern take on the 70s gritty cop drama.
     
  11. Ivan Kipling

    Ivan Kipling Senior member

    Messages:
    2,114
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2006
    Seance on a Wet Afternoon. Another, spellbinding thriller. Kim Stanley is masterful as a medium who arranges to abduct a wealthy couple's child, in order to extract money for the girl's 'whereabouts.'
    Suffocating creepiness, throughout. Shadowy, atmospheric, black and white images. Set near London. Kim Stanley plays the entire film in a tightly wound, coiled up state of semi-hysteria. Oscar nomination for her performance.
    But the real star of the show, is 'the house.' It fairly breathes, ominous portents. Great film.
     
  12. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

    Messages:
    20,008
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2004
    Location:
    New York City / Buenos Aires
    When it comes to cinematography, I still think Barry Lyndon has top honors in the film world. Revolutionary technology allowed for it to be shot in environments where lighting volume was three candlepower. It's such a lush movie.

    Yes, and if they could only make a DVD version worth owning! The "˜best' DVD version isn't even really wide screen, and looks, well pathetic. Hopefully the HD-DVD or BluRay version (whichever format it is by whichever studio owns the film and supported one of the 2 formats...) version will be as perfect as the cinematic version.

    Only Stanley Kubrick had the vision to borrow a lens made and owned by NASA to film a movie.

    Jon.
     
  13. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

    Messages:
    20,008
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2004
    Location:
    New York City / Buenos Aires
    The look definitely, the accent not so much.

    koji


    My sentiments exactly (but they captured Miami during that era very, very well).

    Jon.
     
  14. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

    Messages:
    20,008
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2004
    Location:
    New York City / Buenos Aires
    60s
    -Leopard, the/Italy/Visconti/1963: The last days of the aristocratic era presented by a communist prince (I'm talking about Visconti here), who, by virtue of his dual nature, conveys the right mix of hope and melancholy


    It was so damn long. A good movie, but it was hours of basically the same thing...I saw it when I was younger, maybe I should watch it again.

    Jon.
     
  15. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

    Messages:
    20,008
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2004
    Location:
    New York City / Buenos Aires
    70s

    "¢\tAguirre, the wrath of god/Germany/Herzog/1972: Herzog characters are always on the brink of madness as they vainly grasp at something beyond the reach of Man.


    It's always good when both the director and lead actor are always ready to kill each other (literately).

    Jon.
     
  16. Manny Calavera

    Manny Calavera Senior member

    Messages:
    2,744
    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2006
    Location:
    New York
    Alright, he's also done his share of shitty films too (the Ninth Gate?...), but who hasn't? I can only think of Kubrick...
    Surely you're speaking exclusively about directors who did most of their work stateside? Edit: Fuuma, would it be stepping on your feet if I put together something similar to your list? I've been trying to tackle this thread wholeheartedly for a week now and I just haven't had time. I have a "Top 100" list, so little comments akin to your's shouldn't be too hard to tack on. Plus, your list seems a lot more canonical than mine (not to say you're unoriginal, you probably just have better taste than I do), so I think it would be a perfect counter-point to your run-through.
     
  17. gdl203

    gdl203 Senior member Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

    Messages:
    36,649
    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2005
    Location:
    New York
    Surely you're speaking exclusively about directors who did most of their work stateside?

    On the top of my head, I cannot think of any other prolific and talented director who has made only great films. All of my favorite directors (including Kusturica, Polanski, Scorsese, the Coen brothers, Lynch...) have made some crappy movies. I can only think of Kubrick as the only great prolific filmmaker with a perfect filmography
     
  18. JBZ

    JBZ Senior member

    Messages:
    2,281
    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2003
    On the top of my head, I cannot think of any other prolific and talented director who has made only great films. All of my favorite directors (including Kusturica, Polanski, Scorsese, the Coen brothers, Lynch...) have made some crappy movies. I can only think of Kubrick as the only great prolific filmmaker with a perfect filmography

    I don't know that I'd call Kubrick's filmography perfect, but it's quite good and I don't think he ever made a truly horrible film (though some debate that Eyes Wide Shut was awful - I don't agree, but I wouldn't place it among his better works).

    Kurosawa might be another director with an extremely good, if not perfect, filmography.
     
  19. Manny Calavera

    Manny Calavera Senior member

    Messages:
    2,744
    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2006
    Location:
    New York
    On the top of my head, I cannot think of any other prolific and talented director who has made only great films. All of my favorite directors (including Kusturica, Polanski, Scorsese, the Coen brothers, Lynch...) have made some crappy movies. I can only think of Kubrick as the only great prolific filmmaker with a perfect filmography

    Mizoguchi, Lanzmann and Tati come to mind, but ultimately I think it's all pretty subjective. I do agree Kubrick's quality to output ratio is very impressive.
     
  20. gdl203

    gdl203 Senior member Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

    Messages:
    36,649
    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2005
    Location:
    New York
    I don't know that I'd call Kubrick's filmography perfect, but it's quite good and I don't think he ever made a truly horrible film (though some debate that Eyes Wide Shut was awful - I don't agree, but I wouldn't place it among his better works).

    Kurosawa might be another director with an extremely good, if not perfect, filmography.


    I haven't seen as many Kurasawa as I'd want to echo your view but I would say that every single Kubrick movie - at least since Killer's Kiss in '55, I have only a vague recollection of the previous ones - is a masterpiece. JMO of course...
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by