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SF Cribs: The places behind the clothes

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by designprofessor, Nov 15, 2006.

  1. Kent Wang

    Kent Wang Affiliate Vendor Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

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    GQ: If you don't mind having a separate music app you could use foobar2000 which is extremely configurable. I'm sure there are already presets made for classical music. There's also an iPhone remote component which uses the Apple app Remote, which is similar to the iPhone's built-in iPod and allows you to organize by composer. Foobar2000 is extremely powerful and is the only music player I would use.
     


  2. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Having a Ball

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    Douglas that place looks insane man. Beautiful. I love the little bell.
     


  3. Don Carlos

    Don Carlos In Time Out

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    Douglas, that house is awesome. When you're remodeling, just make sure you leave some of the original details intact. That bell tower's rocking an awesome patina, for instance...
     


  4. Pezzaturra

    Pezzaturra Senior member

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    Fantastic place Douglas. As previously have been mentioned if budget allows try to keep this home as original as possible. I envision your contractors would scrub it off all patina clean, if allowed. Electrical box on the wall and two HVAC units are bad signs of things to come,imho.
    Indian totem polls rock.
     


  5. Douglas

    Douglas Stupid ass member

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    Thanks for all the positive comments, guys. I am very excited about it. The house is not an investment, thank goodness, because I'm going to be putting more money into it than it probably is worth, certainly in this market. It is a very unique house with a lot of history and character, so I'll have to hope someday that someone sees in it all that I do... and is willing to pay for it. Anyways, it's going to be a house for me and my family for years to come, so we're comfortable with our decision.

    @ JetBlast: Yes, it's in the northern part of the city; it's not far from Johns Hopkins University.

    @ Roy: Hopefully we will be in in about 6 months, perhaps 7. The contractor has quoted 16 weeks of construction, so even if he misses the mark by 25% and we don't get started for another 4-6 weeks (historical hurdles to jump) we should make it. I'm curious about the "wired gigabit network." Why do I need one? Is it for A/V purposes, or are there other applications I need to be thinking about? We currently use a wireless network and it seems more than enough for my limited needs, but I welcome edification.

    @ AB and Pezz: We are trying to restore the house with as much respect as possible for the original design intent. While certain elements are going to keep their patinas (we may not paint the shutters, for example) some things just must be done. The A/C units you see are going to go and the new ones will hopefully be smaller and better hidden, and some of the electrical boxes and wires are going to be concealed. As for a lot of the stucco, though, the patina must go as all the flaking, pitting, ivy growing, and cracks are beginning to cause structural issues. All stucco will be cleaned, repaired, and re-painted. We are going to go back to what we believe was the home's original color, which is more of a creamy color than the flat white you see in some of the shots. But things like copper gutters, the patina on the bell, etc. will be retained wherever possible. On the inside, though all bathrooms will be gutted and re-done, we're going to retain as much of the character as we can, so wood floors will remain, details will be preserved (my architect wanted to pull out a gorgeous craftsman-style built-in cabinet but I would not let him, and we are currently fighting over some pocket doors where he says a pipe chase must go), and other touches like window hardware will be kept original. Still, some original details cannot remain: as much as I like radiator heat, it's far more expensive to retrofit them from steam to water and shore them all up, and deal with all the potential safety issues (lead paint, hot metal on baby hands), than to just swap out for an all-new forced air system, for example.

    Oh, and the totem poles: the builder and original occupant of the house was a relatively renowned, locally speaking, Baltimore artist. She was also quite religiously devout. So the three corner totems are Biblically-inspired. All three were executed in situ by the artist.

    One is the Madonna and Child:

    [​IMG]

    One is St. Francis preaching to the birds:

    [​IMG]

    And the third is the Flight into Egypt:

    [​IMG]

    They all need some restoration and shoring up from the elements. There's also a biblical inscription from Luke 24 above the front door: "Stay with us, for it is nearly evening, and the day is almost over."

    I'm not a Christian, so I hope I am not struck dead on moving day.
     


  6. StephenHero

    StephenHero Black Floridian

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    A weirdly awesome place you got there.
     


  7. otc

    otc Senior member

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    @ Roy: Hopefully we will be in in about 6 months, perhaps 7. The contractor has quoted 16 weeks of construction, so even if he misses the mark by 25% and we don't get started for another 4-6 weeks (historical hurdles to jump) we should make it. I'm curious about the "wired gigabit network." Why do I need one? Is it for A/V purposes, or are there other applications I need to be thinking about? We currently use a wireless network and it seems more than enough for my limited needs, but I welcome edification.
    .


    The reason being that if you've got the walls open, it is a hell of a lot cheaper to do it now. The wireless may be good enough now, but who knows what may come in the future--gigabit is a hell of a lot faster than any wireless and they are working on even faster stuff. TVs and Video games are starting to have internet access and streaming HD content can take a lot of bandwidth so it is good to be prepared.

    If you have the walls exposed, you are going to want to run a bunch of cat6 (it is pretty damn cheap in bulk compared to the labor costs of running it 5 years from now). Running it all inside conduit is even better. Every run should also include a piece of string that you can use to pull new wire through with (don't forget to include a new piece of string).

    If you run a few chunks of wire to every room, you don't actually have to connect them to a wall box--just connect what you need and leave the rest unterminated inside the wall so you can expand as necessary. Ideally everything runs out into a little space in the basement (whether it is a cabinet/closet or just a corner). This should be where phone/Cable/Fiber/whatever can come into your house. This will save you from the horrors of cable company installers literally drilling a hole in the wall of your beautiful new house so they can take the shortest route from outside. Keep your modem, network switch, whatever down here, and you can even throw in a backup battery (if you have voip phone service, your phone goes out when the power goes out...now you have some time).

    Some people say a few pieces of cat6, and a run of coax to every room with more to home office type rooms. This might be overdoing it but it makes a lot of sense to see at least one outlet box with conduit in every room so you can pull whatever super fiber optic cable becomes popular in 20 years for devices you would never even expect to exist now.

    Oh yeah, and don't forget a good amount of power outlets. Take the recommended number and add 1 to each room. This stuff is all easy to do when the place is being heavily worked on but a pain to do later.
     


  8. GQgeek

    GQgeek Senior member

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    The reason being that if you've got the walls open, it is a hell of a lot cheaper to do it now. The wireless may be good enough now, but who knows what may come in the future--gigabit is a hell of a lot faster than any wireless and they are working on even faster stuff. TVs and Video games are starting to have internet access and streaming HD content can take a lot of bandwidth so it is good to be prepared.

    If you have the walls exposed, you are going to want to run a bunch of cat6 (it is pretty damn cheap in bulk compared to the labor costs of running it 5 years from now). Running it all inside conduit is even better. Every run should also include a piece of string that you can use to pull new wire through with (don't forget to include a new piece of string).

    If you run a few chunks of wire to every room, you don't actually have to connect them to a wall box--just connect what you need and leave the rest unterminated inside the wall so you can expand as necessary. Ideally everything runs out into a little space in the basement (whether it is a cabinet/closet or just a corner). This should be where phone/Cable/Fiber/whatever can come into your house. This will save you from the horrors of cable company installers literally drilling a hole in the wall of your beautiful new house so they can take the shortest route from outside. Keep your modem, network switch, whatever down here, and you can even throw in a backup battery (if you have voip phone service, your phone goes out when the power goes out...now you have some time).

    Some people say a few pieces of cat6, and a run of coax to every room with more to home office type rooms. This might be overdoing it but it makes a lot of sense to see at least one outlet box with conduit in every room so you can pull whatever super fiber optic cable becomes popular in 20 years for devices you would never even expect to exist now.

    Oh yeah, and don't forget a good amount of power outlets. Take the recommended number and add 1 to each room. This stuff is all easy to do when the place is being heavily worked on but a pain to do later.


    I agree with this. I generally dislike wireless because it can be affected by things outside of your control. Wired is so much more reliable and faster. If you are gutting the house, definitely get this stuff in the walls now. The cost of laying the cable when the walls are down is so cheap that there's no reason not to do it. Go to monoprice.com and buy as many boxes as you need and run that shit everywhere.

    Oh and look at Roy's setup for an idea of what's possible with a wired home. If you start using streaming services or whatever, you'll be happy to have a fast wired connection instead of wireless, which can be temperamental (depending on various factors, sometimes it's rock solid).
     


  9. Stazy

    Stazy Senior member

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    That old house is crazy. I like it.
     


  10. MetroStyles

    MetroStyles Senior member

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    Y'alls places are weak, smalltimers.

    Here's a shot of my crib, circa 2009.

    [​IMG]
     


  11. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Having a Ball

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    Real ballers live in studios. Since moving out of mine and into a 2 BR apt, I feel like such a putz. I like your floors btw.
     


  12. jpeirpont

    jpeirpont Senior member

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    Douglas that house is tough, I love it.
     


  13. zjpj83

    zjpj83 Senior member

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    Real ballers live in studios. Since moving out of mine and into a 2 BR apt, I feel like such a putz. I like your floors btw.

    This studio is pretty sick


    [​IMG]
     


  14. otc

    otc Senior member

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    This studio is pretty sick [​IMG]
    I couldn't find any studios that big and with a usable kitchen with full size appliances on the north side of chicago. I would have been happy with an open floor plan with a studio sized space and a simple room divider like that...everything I saw was just too small where I was looking (like the left half of that picture plus a kitchen with half-size stove and a bathroom). Now I am in a 1-bedroom and having a little bit of trouble dealing with getting out of the metrostyles look. His place (no offense, its what studios do without extensive design work) looks like a dorm room. Everything is in the same room which makes sense because there is only one room. I am used to the dorm/shared college apartment mode of living and it is a bit different trying to get used to the idea that all of this space is *mine* and I don't have to put all of my possessions into my bedroom. I still have far too much crap in my bedroom...but it is getting better after 3.5 months.
     


  15. gomestar

    gomestar Super Yelper

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    ^^^

    eh, not a huge fan of it myself. Big beautiful windows, yet all of the couches point right at the TV. And the angle of that side chair creates a big waste of space, something obviously at a premium in that apartment. I'd replace it with a wooden Eames lounge chair. Maybe even shift everything towards the picture (including the TV), put a smaller side chair on the other side of the couch, and put a day bed or Barcelona stool by the window. Still, a rather nice use of limited space.



    Real ballers live in studios. Since moving out of mine and into a 2 BR apt, I feel like such a putz. I like your floors btw.

    my first NYC place was a studio. Tiny.

    My current place is still tiny, but at least it has 3 separate rooms (living room, kitchen/dining area, bedroom)
     


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