Several questions

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by regularjoe, Feb 2, 2004.

  1. regularjoe

    regularjoe Senior member

    Messages:
    276
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2004
    Hey all,

    Want to say this is a very informative site and I'm very glad there's a place where I can get such useful sartorial information. Introduction aside, I have several loaded questions I was wondering if some kind folks can answer.

    1. Single-needle stitching versus double-needle stitching for dress shirts. If what I've read is correct, the easy way to tell is to examine the side seam of the shirt. Double-stitched will have two parallel stitches running on the outside whereas single-stitched will have one stitch and a fold with the other stitch on the inside of the shirt. Is that accurate? Do manufacturers stitch different parts of the shirt together differently?

    2. How do I tell a fused suit jacket/blazer/sportcoat from a canvas (hand-made)? Can you tell just by looking?

    3. Does anyone have recommendations for getting a suit custom made by a tailor that offers that service? In particular, I'm wondering if there are particular questions I need to ask like where they get their materials from and who actually does the work?

    Thanks in advance for any insight you can provide.
     


  2. banksmiranda

    banksmiranda Senior member

    Messages:
    725
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2003
    Be sure to examine both sides of the seams. On a single-needle seam, one side should have two rows of parallel stitching, while on the other side there should be only one row of stitching. Most shirtmakers put the side with only one row of stitching on the outside, and the parallel rows on the "inside" area of the seam, but Marol is an exception. Marol sews single-needle seams, but the parallel rows are on the outside while the single row is on the inside. On double-needle seams both the inside and the outside will have two parallel rows of stitching. Mr. Kabbaz's informational pages: http://www.customshirt1.com/StyleForum_AskAndy01.htm http://www.customshirt1.com/StyleForum_AskAndy02.htm Ike Behar's shirtmaking procedures: http://ikebehar.com/Factory/stepstomakeshirt.htm
    All you really need to do is turn over the lapel and look at the underside. If the canvas has been attached by pad stitching you will likely see some "depressions." Keep in mind, though, that the lapels are not the only canvassed area of a suit. The chest is also canvassed. Just closely examine the garment.
    There are quite a few options. There are tailors, some who do all the work on the premises, some who send the order to a factory to make the garment. Then there are MTM(made to measure) programs of companies such as Oxxford, Brioni, Kiton, etc. For suit fabrics, traditionally the best come from the United Kingdom(esp. Huddersfield/West Yorkshire) and Italy(esp. Biella). Alias mentioned that Cheil(a division of Samsung) is weaving superfine wool in Korea.
     


  3. Alias

    Alias Senior member

    Messages:
    1,536
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2003
    Location:
    Washington DC
    You should ask the tailor where the suits are made, and if you can visit the workrooms. If the workrooms are ill-lit, full of old women poring over sewing machines and looking like a sweatshop, don't buy.

    Cheil is now modifying its weaving processes to fit the "Italian style," whatever that entails. I don't know much about weaving processes, and even less about the differences between companies in different nations, but I did compare this new fabric with some other lightweight fabric from the same company. This had much more "heft" to it, despite being a Super 150's, and should be more resistant to wrinkling, and having a better drape, not to mention being easier for the tailor to work with. Lightweight silk/wool blends and thin Super 1xx fabrics might kick sartorial ass, and be a merit in warm weather, but it's a nightmare for anyone who has to hand-stitch the thing.
     


  4. regularjoe

    regularjoe Senior member

    Messages:
    276
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2004
    I'm looking at an old Jos A Bank jacket I have. I'm not sure if I see a depression or not, but there does feel like a difference in the material between the lapel and the actual body of the jacket: I can trace my fingers along in bevel of some sort. Is that what I'm looking for?

    Thanks for the info you guys. I've got some tailors I want to go check out and now I have a better of what to look for. Appreciate it.
     


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by