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Seven Year Career Itch: Teaching

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by FtRoyalty, Dec 19, 2010.

  1. FtRoyalty

    FtRoyalty Senior member

    Messages:
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    Nov 17, 2009
    Sorry about another ubiquitous career advice/feedback thread...

    I know there are a couple current and/or former teachers on here, but I'll open this up to others as well. I am currently in my seventh year of teaching English and coaching, but I am beginning to get bored. I enjoy my students and have had success in the profession, but the monotony is beginning to catch up with me. The usual lateral moves of administration and guidance do not appeal to me. I just renewed my teaching license, so I have five years. For the former teachers, what careers did you transition into?

    Note: I have a couple graduate credits in instructional technology and thinking about getting a masters.
     
  2. brown eyes

    brown eyes Senior member

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    Agrestic, CA
    when in doubt, graduate school.
     
  3. BlackShoes

    BlackShoes Senior member

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    Get out of teaching before it stains your CV, when people ask, say you were addicted to crack and needed the money to pay off your dealer. That should go some way towards ameliorating the damage caused so far.
     
  4. rach2jlc

    rach2jlc Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    when in doubt, graduate school.
    +1. Always a good decision, I find (though, of course this depends on family circumstances, as it is easier to become a full time student while single). It's also good because right now career switching is particularly difficult, especially if you have no experience outside of teaching. Being in grad school is a positive/good way to be working on something while waiting/hoping for the job market to improve.
    Get out of teaching before it stains your CV, when people ask, say you were addicted to crack and needed the money to pay off your dealer. That should go some way towards ameliorating the damage caused so far.
    I know you are joking, but it's sad that our culture has such a negative view and disregard of teachers. There are still a few places on earth where we can proudly claim to be teachers and not have to say it in a hushed tone, though sadly none of these are in English-speaking lands.
     
  5. kungapa

    kungapa Senior member

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    Dec 12, 2010
    +1. Always a good decision, I find (though, of course this depends on family circumstances, as it is easier to become a full time student while single). It's also good because right now career switching is particularly difficult, especially if you have no experience outside of teaching. Being in grad school is a positive/good way to be working on something while waiting/hoping for the job market to improve.

    This is what MBAs were made for, no.
     
  6. MaxHeadroom

    MaxHeadroom Active Member

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    20 minutes in the future
    What's wrong with teaching?

    It's not that bad a career move after many years gaining experience working in industry, and maybe some people would like to do things for others, and help pass on their knowledge.
     
  7. JayJay

    JayJay Senior member

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    Graduate school.
     
  8. SField

    SField Senior member

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    Oct 19, 2008
    +1. Always a good decision, I find (though, of course this depends on family circumstances, as it is easier to become a full time student while single). It's also good because right now career switching is particularly difficult, especially if you have no experience outside of teaching. Being in grad school is a positive/good way to be working on something while waiting/hoping for the job market to improve.



    I know you are joking, but it's sad that our culture has such a negative view and disregard of teachers. There are still a few places on earth where we can proudly claim to be teachers and not have to say it in a hushed tone, though sadly none of these are in English-speaking lands.


    Aren't you a prof at the university level though?

    Primary and secondary school teachers are scoffed at because of how horrific the education system in america is, and because of how just about anyone can become a teacher. Both of those issues have complex causes and solutions and both issues obviously don't tell the whole story (hence prejudices which should not be applied to many teachers out there.) In any case, it shouldn't be that way. In other parts of the world, being a teacher is something that grants one a certain level of respect in society that we don't really get here.
     
  9. gamelan

    gamelan Senior member

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    at the software company where i work at, we've had a few former teachers transition really well into presales engineering positions. one of them actually heads up the department. but the skillset seems to transfer over nicely so it's not like your years of teaching were for naught.

    -Jeff
     
  10. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Senior member

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    The Temple of Jawnz
    My dad ended up makng the beginnings of what is a classroom productivity software that is run by Apple and does work on that still. A few former teachers benefited from things like that pretty well and there is still a lot to bring to schools in terms of obtainable technologies, most teachers will never have the time to work on software but they are among the ones most knowledgeable to do so.
     
  11. BlackShoes

    BlackShoes Senior member

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    I know you are joking, but it's sad that our culture has such a negative view and disregard of teachers. There are still a few places on earth where we can proudly claim to be teachers and not have to say it in a hushed tone, though sadly none of these are in English-speaking lands.


    I wasn't joking.
     
  12. uhurit

    uhurit Senior member

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    ...All things considered, probably not the best time to change careers. Instead, become a very good, well-respected, innovative teacher, and take pride in what you do
     
  13. Rambo

    Rambo Senior member

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    I'M IN MIAMI, BITCH
    For the love of god, if you can find another job that you enjoy, get out of teaching now.
     
  14. CBrown85

    CBrown85 Senior member

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    I haven't been teaching for long, but I think the requirements in Canada are different than they are in the states. To teach anything but shop you need two undergraduate degrees, so I've been working pretty hard to get in. Also, once you've got your degrees it's basically a fight to actually get hired (as an on-call. good luck actually gettting a contract) because of the number being cranked out vs. the shrinking district sizes, so I'm pretty lucky.

    That said, if you've been teaching for seven years (which I read is the average career length of a teacher) you're either hitting a natural burnout or you just need a change. Change schools if you want to stay in but need a different environment. But if you see yourself just being unhappy, you're not going to be a very good teacher. It's one of those things you kind of have to emotionally invest in, especially when so many people hate you for no particularly good reason.
     
  15. madstaxbro

    madstaxbro Senior member

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    JBLM
    I have K - 5 credentials, teaching in a private school. The workload is really easy to get through + lesson plans are cake. If I were you I'd transition into some sort of craft like leatherworking or cordwaining, even SF is a great resource.
     
  16. TeeKay

    TeeKay Senior member

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    If you decide to go the education route, do NOT go into a straight MS/PhD program for the hard sciences. These are DEAD END. There are only so many tenure tract jobs out there and more than likely you'll be stuck doing post-doc after post-doc. On top of that, your salary won't be much different than what you make now and it will certainly be more difficult.

    If you do want to go back to school, make it a professional school such as Law, Medicine, Dentistry,..heck, even ministry isn't a bad career. These jobs are not limited nearly as much by the economy and they nearly guarantee you a nice career as soon as you graduate.
     
  17. philosophe

    philosophe Senior member

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    If you're really feeling bored or burned out, you should leave teaching, which works best when it's a labor of love.

    Be careful, though, about taking on a lot of debt for a career change.
     
  18. Gibonius

    Gibonius Senior member

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    Posting so I can follow this thread. I've been teaching chemistry at the college level for about a year now and I'm already getting bored. I'm in a bit of a different scenario, since I already have a PhD. I don't really feel challenged by teaching, once I've done a class a few times most of the kinks are worked out and it's just the same thing with different kids.

    If I were going to do this long term, I think I'd have to find somewhere more selective on students, but those jobs are hard to get.

    Looking forward to getting into industry and actually using my skills. I like teaching, but it's just not doing it for me right now. Maybe once I get older and don't have enough energy to do anything more stressful.
     
  19. Milpool

    Milpool Senior member

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    Jan 30, 2010
    If you decide to go the education route, do NOT go into a straight MS/PhD program for the hard sciences. These are DEAD END. There are only so many tenure tract jobs out there and more than likely you'll be stuck doing post-doc after post-doc. On top of that, your salary won't be much different than what you make now and it will certainly be more difficult.

    If you do want to go back to school, make it a professional school such as Law, Medicine, Dentistry,..heck, even ministry isn't a bad career. These jobs are not limited nearly as much by the economy and they nearly guarantee you a nice career as soon as you graduate.


    Law nearly guarantees a nice career as soon as you graduate??? Really? Noticed all the threads here complaining about how hard it is to get a nice law career? Even the JD/MBAs in my bschool class had a hell of a time.
     
  20. Gibonius

    Gibonius Senior member

    Messages:
    11,110
    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2009
    Location:
    Suburban Sprawl Sector 3, Maryland
    If you decide to go the education route, do NOT go into a straight MS/PhD program for the hard sciences. These are DEAD END. There are only so many tenure tract jobs out there and more than likely you'll be stuck doing post-doc after post-doc. On top of that, your salary won't be much different than what you make now and it will certainly be more difficult.

    Also, this isn't true for sciences that have industry jobs. There are plenty of chemistry and biology industry jobs out there, and the salary increases from BS to PhD can be massive (3x or more). Unemployment averages 2% for chem PhD's in the US, and was only 4.5% during the height of the recession.

    Academics is certainly a rough path, and I wouldn't advise someone to go into physics/astronomy/etc, but there are hard sciences with very good job prospects outside of academics.
     

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