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Saphir Renovateur + Mink Oil

Athomas

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Hi,

Does anyone have any thoughts on how Saphir Renovateur is Mink-oil based? A simple search will yield many posts touting the quality of Renovateur, but at the same time, you have, probably just as many people bad-mouthing mink oil. So what's the deal? Is Renovateur good for high-end shoes/leather or not? If it's "good", then does that invalidate all of the negative reviews about mink oil?

Also, is the general consensus on museum calf not to use conditioner? I've used both Lexol and Renovateur and both not only darken leather, but strip the finish as well. I don't want dry and cracked shoes but surely would like to preserve the original color of my shoes. Read a post a day or so back where one member completely stripped the beautiful finish on a pair of Lobbs using what a JL representative told him to use: A cream in the same color shade as the shoe. So what to do? Refrain from using creams and conditioners?

Not extremely knowledge about leather or the process in which they use to dye the leather, but I've read that some finishes are due to tanning and can't be removed via creams or conditioners (not sure how accurate that is, though) and other finishes are achieved by using different polishes and waxes and what have you, and thus why cream and conditioner are able to remove said finish. So considering most people won't know which is which (unless they do some kind of spot test, which I personally wouldn't want to do), is the only option not to use creams or conditioners on anything besides shoes that are of a solid color?

Thanks,
-A
 

entrero

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I think Saphir Renovateur should be used on badly dried out shoes. Mink oil is not a bad leather conditioner, but for dress shoes it's a disaster. Your shoes won't ever get shines again. So mink should be reserved for rugged gear.

I also use lexol, but I have none of your issues. Lexol is as light as lotion, barely darkens and doesn't affect the finish.
 

KObalto

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Why do you think Renovateur is mink oil based?
 

Hannes

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Originally Posted by entrero
Lexol is as light as lotion, barely darkens and doesn't affect the finish.
That sounds pretty much like Saphir Renovateur as well. It is mink oil based, but still works fine on dress shoes and all kinds of leather.
 

lee_44106

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How about this answer:

Renovateur = OVERRATED, OVER-HYPED French product people automatically assume must be the bees-kness
 

Kuro

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renovatuer is good, but i don't believe that it is meant to be used as frequently as the comments here suggest...

i don't use it for every polish job, but rather when my shoes get roughed-up (e.g. soaked through by rain)

there is a new saphir product apparently based on renovateur that is a bees waxed based lotion with mink oil that is supposed to be lighter..
 

entrero

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Originally Posted by Kuro
renovatuer is good, but i don't believe that it is meant to be used as frequently as the comments here suggest...

i don't use it for every polish job, but rather when my shoes get roughed-up (e.g. soaked through by rain)

there is a new saphir product apparently based on renovateur that is a bees waxed based lotion with mink oil that is supposed to be lighter..


Depiedencap suggest the same, so there must be a reason...
Any beeswax mix suggest waterproofing properties, therefore thicker
 

holymadness

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I wouldn't trust the sartorial advice of a DPEC member as far as I could throw him.
 

Son Of Saphir

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Originally Posted by lee_44106
How about this answer:

Renovateur = OVERRATED, OVER-HYPED French product people automatically assume must be the bees-kness


Yes.
 

Nick V.

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Originally Posted by lee_44106
How about this answer:

Renovateur = OVERRATED, OVER-HYPED French product people automatically assume must be the bees-kness


Why do you say?
We use it. I think it's fantastic.
 

BBC

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Never tried Saphir products, but I'm a recent convert to Venetian Shoe Cream - can be used on both calfskin and shell cordovan and gives a fantastic shine to the shell.

 

DWFII

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Normally, I would advise against using mink oil on any dress shoe. But thanks to the generosity of Rider, I tried some Renovateur. It's OK. I don't think there is a lot of mink oil in it and/or what there is may be highly homogenized. That said, I don't think I would use it on dress shoes all that often. It does seem to have a bit of a greasy feel. I don't mean "greasy" like pork fat, just that it leaves a slightly sticky residue. Any product that isn't absorbed into the leather immediately...and sometimes the leather finish is more a barrier than the conditioner...must be wiped off almost without pause, any residue will pick up and collect dirt and grit in the creases of the shoe. I know I'm biased after nearly 40 years in the business but I think it's hard to beat Lexol--Lexol Conditioner (brown bottle). As for Lexol Conditioner removing colour or darkening the leather...the only way that is gonna happen is if the leather is open grained and the colour applied after the shoes have been made. AIUI, this is a common technique in Europe especially where many makers use "crust" and apply various antiques and stains in the finishing room.
 

Son Of Saphir

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Originally Posted by Nick V.
Why do you say?
We use it. I think it's fantastic.


Not seem to do anything for me shoes.
Seem useless.
Me try it on real test tommorrow,
dirty mud cover tan brogue,
it look very messy right now and stained.
 

maxnharry

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I am still a Crema Alpina/Crema Nubiana fan and lucky enough to have a source. I wouldn't bring any mink oil within 20ft of a pair of good shoes.
 

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