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Saddest thing

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Korben, Dec 4, 2009.

  1. Thomas

    Thomas Senior member

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    Now that we've had him for a couple of years, his 3-legged-ness has become a bit of a novelty. He's a little less graceful, a bit more lumbering, but more than capable, able to get around and, yes, even jump (though that's more like wobble-launch + clamber-pull-up).

    For others who might be in a similar situation I can at least say that losing a back leg for a cat is not only survivable, but perfectly do-able. They'll "pogo-stick" more than walk, but they'll be able to get around and manage just fine. I've heard that losing a front leg is a bit more difficult, but I don't know this first hand and, suspect, just like our Max, the animal in question will adapt to what they have. And, being the troopers that they are, they'll do it faster and better than you'd expect.

    I don't think I conveyed it well in my previous post, but I'll try again - what occurred to me after bringing him home and seeing his reaction - no problems! - was that I was wrapped up in the emotion of the event. Since I could envision the "what if?" I was upset about the ramifications. For him it was just up-and-at-'em, a few days of "hmmm, something's odd?", adaption, and then moving on with his life. There was no sorrow, no worries, and no complaining - nothing more than "it's a new day dad, where do we go from here?" It was a lesson in a nutshell on practical pragmatism.


    An old ex-gf has an old-ish cat that had an eye removed earlier this year. Six days afterwards she posted a pic of said cat on fb, and I was horrified. We spoke later on and I asked her about it: she said it was the vet's recommendation, and Winky was getting along just fine with just the one eye.
     
  2. razl

    razl Senior member

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    People (Americans) are SO soft these days.....
    I agree, but it has nothing to do with whether we cry or not...


    There are 100 trillion things worse in the world than a cat getting killed by a dog.
    Sure, but the idea of any creature being mauled to death should resonate with every human being. That's what empathy is, and it's part of what makes us human.

    Yes, blocking it is necessary too - otherwise, in the words of Denis Prager, we'd literally drown in pain.

    Just my .02, I have no real gripes with whether it really registers with you or not.
     
  3. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

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    My wife and I do a lot of cat rescue work (though it's mostly trap/spay/neuter/release)

    Let me just say--you people really get on my nerves. How can you think it's more humane to "release" feral animals? Either find homes for them or destroy them. Sheesh.
     
  4. Dakota rube

    Dakota rube Senior member

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    2) Humans trace back to the dawn of life on earth just as pumas do.


    Help me here...
     
  5. Nosu3

    Nosu3 Senior member

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    There are 100 trillion things worse in the world than a cat getting killed by a dog.

    The story wasn't just about the cat being killed. It was about how poorly it was treated by people and that its life was full of neglect when people could have been more kind and compassionate toward the kitten.
     
  6. Prince

    Prince Senior member

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    So I was on my way to work this morning driving my normal path and I come to a red light. A car had hit a kitten and the poor thing was trying to move with two legs.. The other two both on the same side had been crushed.. Its raining and cold and just a miserable day. I am sitting there in a new suit, warm car and gloves. I just couldn't take it... (this is one of the major streets in my city). I flip on my flashers get out of the car go to the middle of the intersection and pick the little thing up. Not a car moves... I get back in, put the little guy in the passenger seat (its making the worst sounds I have ever heard). Luckily my son had left his gym bag in the back and towel was hanging out, so I wrapped him up. Pulled a U turn in the intersection and went to the animal hospital a few blocks away. Long story short a ruined suit, two missed morning meetings, and about $2,000 in vet bills so far, I have a new little cat I'm gonna call.... Rudy. The little thing lost one leg completely but the vet salvaged the other. I thought they would just put it down but they asked me if I wanted them to try and save it and well I couldn't say no. He is resting at the hospital for now and they told me in 2 weeks I may be able to bring him home.

    And to top it all off I am allergic to cats, starting allergy shots.


    You are a good man. Story made my day. [​IMG]

    Looking forward to an update.
     
  7. Toronto34

    Toronto34 Senior member

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    Congrats on that show of compassion.

    All the best to you and your new cat.
     
  8. razl

    razl Senior member

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    Let me just say--you people really get on my nerves. How can you think it's more humane to "release" feral animals? Either find homes for them or destroy them. Sheesh.

    Real feral cats can't be homed - you'd be lucky to even touch one without getting a bite. We actually do have a few true ferals that we've placed (including one at our house, who took about 3 years to come around to the point where we can even touch him, and even then he still has a wild-look in his eye that makes you think twice...) but generally speaking, it's just not an option.

    That said, ferals are capable of living in the urban/suburban "wild". They've learned to scavange since birth and are appropriately fearful of most everything. Their biggest problem is usually cars or people harassing them and not much else. That said, we're reconciled with the fact that is the real world and, yes, we've had to put down a number that were mortally wounded from incidents with such things.

    fyi: for the ferals we do re-release, it's usually a colony of sorts and we're supervising. We make regular weekly rounds, we source/buy/donate the food ourselves, we know the cats and the people/environment around them. We usually have local volunteers enlisted to handle feeding and keep their eyes on them. Since the food is regular, the cats stay around and don't venture. We have also moved individual cats and even entire (small) colonies when it just wasn't practical where they were located (usually because people politely objected).

    I think what you're confusing cats that are lost, dumped, abandoned with ferals. We catch and fix many more of those and generally get them adopted out - either directly or through various groups that we volunteer with. Indeed, I have a little of 4 kittens fostering in my garage right now (+2 adults) that I'm desperately looking to get homes for as of now.

    So, in general, we do what you ask - if a cat is re-home'able, we get them placed. But real ferals aren't, so we don't. In some cases, sadly, when the animals are injured or just unsustainable, we do have them put down. Additionally, I'll add that plenty of pregnant cats get litters aborted in the process of spaying, which is a shame but - in the end - means less cats on the streets. I think that's what we're both hoping for.
     
  9. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

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    So not only are you releasing these animals onto the streets, but you're feeding them as well. If I lived near one of your "colonies," I'd sue you for creating a nuisance.
     
  10. razl

    razl Senior member

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    So not only are you releasing these animals onto the streets, but you're feeding them as well. If I lived near one of your "colonies," I'd sue you for creating a nuisance.
    You may be misunderstanding me - or not - but we aren't "releasing them onto the streets" in-so-far as being the originator of the problem. We are catching them, where they live, limiting the problem by ensuring that they don't have any more kittens and any that have disease are put down on the spot, and we release them where we got them from if they aren't adoptable. In most situations, we work with the locals to ensure that the cats are cared for. Where not, we work to transplant. In the end, people tend to have 1 of 3 options: 1. the situation as-is, and the colony will grow exponentially. 2. we limit (hopefully stop) the growth and at least ensure that those that are there are healthy and cared for (meaning less intrusion on others property/garbage) 3. call animal services who will round up and destroy them. We don't prevent #3, and sometimes it's the only option. Indeed, we've even assisted it. But #2 is where we think we can do the most good for all involved and we work hard - as volunteers, on our own time and dime - to reduce or prevent #1. If you're preferred solution is #3, then by all means, get on it. I have no qualms, we just believe that #2 is more humane. More importantly, at the end of the day I believe our contributions - while not your ideal - are a net positive, and that's what we're trying to do.
     
  11. IUtoSLU

    IUtoSLU Senior member

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    That said, ferals are capable of living in the urban/suburban "wild". They've learned to scavange since birth and are appropriately fearful of most everything.

    fyi: for the ferals we do re-release, it's usually a colony of sorts and we're supervising. We make regular weekly rounds, we source/buy/donate the food ourselves, we know the cats and the people/environment around them. We usually have local volunteers enlisted to handle feeding and keep their eyes on them. Since the food is regular, the cats stay around and don't venture.

    Which is it?
     
  12. razl

    razl Senior member

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    Which is it?
    Being the smarties that they are, they'll take repeatable handouts over hunting/foraging (well, maybe not always - leftovers in the garbage can still be tastier then a can of Friskies, or if peer contention is too high). But they will revert back as soon as the food stops. So, we provide food to our colonies - 98% of which we purchase at cost, but occasionally we get handouts or donations - but if we're late to a feeder, well things quickly get back to "in the wild". The other good news about the feeding is that it keeps them centralized and helps to limit their roaming. Since they all want to be first in when the food hits the plates, they tend to linger. That's a tool for us since we can position the feedings away from places people find obtrusive or just inconvenient. And, generally, it's preferable to them dumpster diving and leaving scraps around (though cats don't make nearly the mess that raccoons do...) Hope that helps clear it up! ps - I really didn't mean to hijack the thread with Feral/TSNR stuff, but here's hoping the the insight might have helped generate some additional understanding.
     
  13. skinnyman

    skinnyman Well-Known Member

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    If anyone has issue with what razl is doing or anything else not directly involving Rudy you are free to start your own thread. I keep coming here checking for updates on an inspiring story and instead I come across all sorts of negativity and snide remarks. Let's not ruin a good story here!
     
  14. Incman

    Incman Senior member

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    So not only are you releasing these animals onto the streets, but you're feeding them as well. If I lived near one of your "colonies," I'd sue you for creating a nuisance.
    stfu. and razl, you're a good person [​IMG]
     
  15. gdl203

    gdl203 Senior member Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

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    Help me here...

    [​IMG]
     
  16. Nosu3

    Nosu3 Senior member

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    ps - I really didn't mean to hijack the thread with Feral/TSNR stuff, but here's hoping the the insight might have helped generate some additional understanding.

    Very kind of you to help them out and much appreciated by many.

    I see feral cat colonies all the time at beaches, they live under the boardwalks mostly and are fed cat food by the public. It's nice to know the rest of the process involved. Is the goal to keep the population sustainable or just eventually let the colony die off naturally?
     
  17. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

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    I understand that you're doing what you do out of sympathy, but in my judgment it's misplaced. How about instead of feeding and nurturing a "colony" of cats, it was a colony of rats? They're both nuisance animals--or are the rats not cute enough?
     
  18. Nosu3

    Nosu3 Senior member

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    I understand that you're doing what you do out of sympathy, but in my judgment it's misplaced. How about instead of feeding and nurturing a "colony" of cats, it was a colony of rats? They're both nuisance animals--or are the rats not cute enough?

    Can you explain what non-human animal cuteness is?
     
  19. razl

    razl Senior member

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    I understand that you're doing what you do out of sympathy, but in my judgment it's misplaced. How about instead of feeding and nurturing a "colony" of cats, it was a colony of rats? They're both nuisance animals--or are the rats not cute enough?
    I think we'd all be lying to ourselves if we didn't say cuteness had something to do with our acceptance of different species, but I don't think that really explains it. It's more the domestication of the species - meaning, it's ability to interact with and serve man in a domestic setting. Feral cats are essentially cast-off of domesticated species. Yes, they can live in "the suburban wild", but that's not really their purpose and they aren't geared well for it. To be sure, they're capable, but there's nothing more pitiful than a feral Persian who's coat is perpetually matted (and all the problems that go with it) because it's breeding accentuated traits for man, not for the wild. It's almost like something man went to all this work to shape and create cast off as garbage - but unfortunately it's a living thing. All feral cats struggle with issues like this - even though they might look content to be foraging, the outside world really isn't their ideal everyday environment. Could rats be domesticated? Sure, but they aren't. Any and all rats ideal environment is currently the wild, not with man (the fact that a few adventurous souls have made great pets of some, notwithstanding). A better contrast might be (if we lived in wilder places, thankfully we don't) a colony of panthers vs. a colony of domestic (feral or non) cats. I'd be leaving the panthers alone but working on the cat colony. The panthers are beautiful (by my eye) and even of the same family (genus?) but only one group really needs us.
     
  20. Incman

    Incman Senior member

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    I understand that you're doing what you do out of sympathy, but in my judgment it's misplaced. How about instead of feeding and nurturing a "colony" of cats, it was a colony of rats? They're both nuisance animals--or are the rats not cute enough?

    I have two pet rats and I love them. Such intelligent creatures. One of the few animals capable of metacognition.
     

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