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K. Nights

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Hi @sehkelly - speaking of, the advice for all the linen shirts on your website is to size down as they fit big. Do they actually make up larger than the dimensions in the size chart, or is this more a matter of how the fabric behaves when worn?
 

sehkelly

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Hi @sehkelly - speaking of, the advice for all the linen shirts on your website is to size down as they fit big. Do they actually make up larger than the dimensions in the size chart, or is this more a matter of how the fabric behaves when worn?
It's a combination of it kicking away from the body and draping to its absolute fullest extent, and stretching more than other cloth when going under the sewing machines.

With the linen poplin the latter doesn't really happen very much if at all, but with some other materials, such as the linen burlap we use quite often for heavier items, it really does stretch during make, so the lengths of the sleeve and body are longer than when made with any other cloth.

The advice is more to size down if you are between sizes, by the way — if you're an out and out size 40, let's say, you'd be much better with M than S.
 
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sehkelly

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We've been working on the trucker jacket the past couple of weeks — with what started as a "check it's all in-place before production" escalating to a re-working of the collar and shoulder and a full-scale analysis and implementation of bulk-reduction.

The last part is what animates me the most! Because we make the trucker in heavy corduroy, certain points are prone to being thick and bulky. Where the body joins the hem-band, for instance, you have 8 or 10 layers of cloth coming together, which, when it's heavy corduroy, is properly chunky. So we've worked out a new way to construct certain parts of the jacket, in innovative and hopefully helpful ways, such that it'll have a flatter, cleaner look in those regions.

And the collar is more pointy.

trucker-v2-dev-1s@2x.jpg
trucker-v2-dev-2s@2x.jpg
trucker-v2-dev-3s@2x.jpg


Ignore the colour, by the way — we'll be making it in cedar brown and dark brown.
 

DanielPicktonAllen

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I’ve wondered, the collar/ button area (not sure of the technical name) of my trucker sort of rolls open at the top very gradually. Is this intentional? Is there a way of somehow pressing the collar to open more crisply (without damaging the fabric which is beautiful, I have the rust/cedar brown, it’s quite a close match to my hair actually if maybe a bit lighter, it has a similar slightly reddish brown that can look almost gold in the right light feeling).
 

sehkelly

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I’ve wondered, the collar/ button area (not sure of the technical name) of my trucker sort of rolls open at the top very gradually. Is this intentional? Is there a way of somehow pressing the collar to open more crisply (without damaging the fabric which is beautiful, I have the rust/cedar brown, it’s quite a close match to my hair actually if maybe a bit lighter, it has a similar slightly reddish brown that can look almost gold in the right light feeling).
Sorry to ask — do you mean it isn't sitting upright in the area above the top button (curling down like a piece of paper) ... or that the front of the jacket doesn't fold open cleanly at the front when worn unbuttoned?

Either way, you could try ironing it with plenty of steam. Then, while it is cooling and drying (as the steam evaporates and a few minutes afterwards, while the cloth is damp) holding it in the position you want.

The reason I say to hold it after steaming is that the fibres are softened and opened with the steam, and will slowly firm up as they cool. If you hold it, they'll firm up in the position you want.

Careful when you do this because the brass buttons will get hot.

Or taking it to a dry-cleaner to have the area steamed and pressed. But in my experience, unless they take real pride in their work, they're going to look at you funny if you ask them to "hold the area while it cools".
 

DanielPicktonAllen

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Sorry to ask — do you mean it isn't sitting upright in the area above the top button (curling down like a piece of paper) ... or that the front of the jacket doesn't fold open cleanly at the front when worn unbuttoned?

Either way, you could try ironing it with plenty of steam. Then, while it is cooling and drying (as the steam evaporates and a few minutes afterwards, while the cloth is damp) holding it in the position you want.

The reason I say to hold it after steaming is that the fibres are softened and opened with the steam, and will slowly firm up as they cool. If you hold it, they'll firm up in the position you want.

Careful when you do this because the brass buttons will get hot.

Or taking it to a dry-cleaner to have the area steamed and pressed. But in my experience, unless they take real pride in their work, they're going to look at you funny if you ask them to "hold the area while it cools".
I think the latter of the two scenarios you describe.
It’s not a problem really, I’m not really confident enough to take an iron to the corduroy it’s so pretty.
 

RozenKristal

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I think the latter of the two scenarios you describe.
It’s not a problem really, I’m not really confident enough to take an iron to the corduroy it’s so pretty.
Use a hand held steamer. I know it sounds dangerous but you only need to make it soften up a bit to reform the collar. I used a hand held one on the balmacaan placket to straighten it out. Dont use an iron to press on the cord though.
 

sehkelly

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Handheld steamers — every home should have one!

In other news, the field trousers are starting, I think, to come into their own, and come out from the shadow of the old proper trousers. These are made with cotton duck from Lancashire. It's a little heavier and more coarse and more crisp than the cotton panama used for the slim trousers a few weeks back, but very much the same sort of cloth.

field-trousers-cotton-canvas-olive-5s@2x.jpg

field-trousers-cotton-canvas-corn-14s@2x.jpg

field-trousers-cotton-canvas-olive-15s@2x.jpg

field-trousers-cotton-canvas-corn-2s@2x.jpg

field-trousers-cotton-canvas-corn-6s@2x.jpg

field-trousers-cotton-canvas-olive-7s@2x.jpg

field-trousers-cotton-canvas-olive-3s@2x.jpg

field-trousers-cotton-canvas-corn-9s@2x.jpg

field-trousers-cotton-canvas-olive-8s@2x.jpg


It's one of those fabrics which shows off the lines of the design, I think, with all the panels and suchlike.
 

asewonder

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Handheld steamers — every home should have one!

In other news, the field trousers are starting, I think, to come into their own, and come out from the shadow of the old proper trousers. These are made with cotton duck from Lancashire. It's a little heavier and more coarse and more crisp than the cotton panama used for the slim trousers a few weeks back, but very much the same sort of cloth.

View attachment 1808876
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It's one of those fabrics which shows off the lines of the design, I think, with all the panels and suchlike.
These look wonderful! What season or temperatures would these be appropriate for?
 

sehkelly

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These look wonderful! What season or temperatures would these be appropriate for?
I'd say they're suitable for all the same climates and conditions as a pair of mid-weight jeans.

Autumn and spring would be their ideal time of year, but they're very much helped in warmer weather by the leg being quite wide and breezy.
 

asewonder

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I'd say they're suitable for all the same climates and conditions as a pair of mid-weight jeans.

Autumn and spring would be their ideal time of year, but they're very much helped in warmer weather by the leg being quite wide and breezy.
Thanks, makes perfect sense!
 

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