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ghh923

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Since L and XL weren't made, I've bought an M and hoping the unstructured nature gives me room for a modest sportcoat or sweater underneath (natural 42). If not, and there's someone else in the US who would be interested in a medium with a try-on or two, feel free to message me. Now less concerned about the sleeves with the above info.
 

sehkelly

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Since L and XL weren't made, I've bought an M and hoping the unstructured nature gives me room for a modest sportcoat or sweater underneath (natural 42). If not, and there's someone else in the US who would be interested in a medium with a try-on or two, feel free to message me. Now less concerned about the sleeves with the above info.
Many, many thanks.

There's nothing unduly small about these coats apart from the length of the sleeves (which can be lengthened by a tailor, which while hardly the best scenario in the world, does help). The body is shorter than our usual trench coat, but in fit that's neither here nor there, and it is still by no means a short trench (shudders).

It is otherwise true to size for our trench coat.
 

sehkelly

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@sehkelly Hey Paul, just wondering if the fabric is 19 oz? It looks quite thick and by any chance you meant 29?
It's not often the weaver of the cloth gets involved, but Sam Goates of Woven in the Bone up in Scotland — she who knows a Hattersley loom better than the rest of us our laptops — says ...

"My understanding is that in UK trade, most people talk about the weight per linear metre at the cloth width, which is usually 150cm wide. For example 500gms @ 150cm. This, however, does not always seem to be the case ... which is frustrating. Europe (as we did in Australia) seem to talk in GSM (grams per square metre) and not gms (grams).

As my cloth is only 75cm wide, I’ve been saying recently it is 400gms @ 75cm, but the equivalent — i.e. what I think most people are likely to compare it to in 150cm wide — would therefore be 800gms @ 150cm wide. Or 28oz at 150cm wide, which seems a totally bonkers mix of metric and imperial.

Does that help or make things worse?"

I think we can all agree this helps.

28oz it is!

... right?

Unless another master weaver here knows otherwise?
 

Encore

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it makes things worse.. at least for me! I was gonna use the fabric weight as excuse to convince myself that I really cannot buy another coat this year...

:brick: :brick: :brick: :brick: :brick: :brick:
 

sehkelly

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it makes things worse.. at least for me! I was gonna use the fabric weight as excuse to convince myself that I really cannot buy another coat this year...

:brick: :brick: :brick: :brick: :brick: :brick:
Oh dear!

In general — and irrespective of the accuracy of the numbers — I've always believed there's more to the warmth of a cloth than its weight.

The quality and variety of the yarn (some trap warm air; some don't), the nature of the weave (some breathe or have good heat-transfer; some don't) and that's not to mention the manifold factors of the coat itself (I find a raglan sleeve much lighter on the body than a set-in) — they all have as much a bearing on the experience.
 

Spicycurry

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Having to tailor the coat immediately does not sound enticing especially given the substantial cost but such is the problem with longer limbs.
 

susanvonrbach

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FYI to everyone, we have a size XS bridge coat in the super heavyweight (probably 32 oz) triple worsted navy wool from a few years back, in like-new condition due to the fit being a bit too snug for its owner with underlayers. Will post in buy & sell classifieds but wanted to cross-post here in case anyone was interested. Please DM. Regards, Susan
 

FlyingHorker

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Oh dear!

In general — and irrespective of the accuracy of the numbers — I've always believed there's more to the warmth of a cloth than its weight.

The quality and variety of the yarn (some trap warm air; some don't), the nature of the weave (some breathe or have good heat-transfer; some don't) and that's not to mention the manifold factors of the coat itself (I find a raglan sleeve much lighter on the body than a set-in) — they all have as much a bearing on the experience.
Interesting. Does that mean all else being equivalent, a raglan would be less warm than a set-in? Or did I misinterpret?
 

sehkelly

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Interesting. Does that mean all else being equivalent, a raglan would be less warm than a set-in? Or did I misinterpret?
No, no ... !

I just meant that there's a lot more to the warmth or experienced weight of a coat other than the weight of the cloth.
 

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