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Shetterd

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Yes!

The weaver has a level of enthusiasm that I find quite personally shaming. Thankfully it is contagious from afar, so I've been able to latch onto that, and when I visit in person next month, I'll be able to sink into the same bath of lanolin-fuelled adrenaline, too.

Between this and the four tweeds being woven in Donegal right now, I feel spoilt.
Looks fantastic Paul! Do you have any photos of the trench coat model you'll use for this?
 

sehkelly

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Spaghettimatt

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Yes!

The weaver has a level of enthusiasm that I find quite personally shaming. Thankfully it is contagious from afar, so I've been able to latch onto that, and when I visit in person next month, I'll be able to sink into the same bath of lanolin-fuelled adrenaline, too.

Between this and the four tweeds being woven in Donegal right now, I feel spoilt.
Can’t wait to see the donegal!
Any decision re how much length you’re adding to the standard bal?
 

sehkelly

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Can’t wait to see the donegal!
Any decision re how much length you’re adding to the standard bal?
Me neither!

It'll be two inches shorter than the Styleforum version, so 41" down the back.

A (quite predictable) outcome of lengthening the balmacaan for Styleforum, by such an extent, was that it was quite difficult to go back to the original design and not see it as "short" ... which is bias in action, because we've been very happy with it for half a decade. But still, we decided to lengthen it to bring it in line with the same sort of length as the Chesterfield and tielocken.
 

Csus2

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The calculations say 18oz.

But it's thicker and chunkier than the natte tweed used last time for the trench, so ... well, there you go! Weaving maths.
oh, thanks Paul. that wasn't necessary, aha. My curiousity could have waited. BUT, since you bothered: From my recollection, 18oz seems to be a lighter weight fabric than your wool coats generally are built with, correct? How would that affect the warmth? Have you made wool coats with such a weight before, and what do people generally think of them? Does the thickness/chunkiness mean that the fabric is essentially more airy than a heavier, thinner fabric?

I've been eyeing a trench for a long time, but I worry this particular edition may not meet my needs, even if I think the fabric will probably look fantastic. or maybe I just need to see it as a late autumn/early winter/early spring coat.
 

sehkelly

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oh, thanks Paul. that wasn't necessary, aha. My curiousity could have waited. BUT, since you bothered: From my recollection, 18oz seems to be a lighter weight fabric than your wool coats generally are built with, correct? How would that affect the warmth? Have you made wool coats with such a weight before, and what do people generally think of them? I've been eyeing a trench for a long time, but I worry this particular edition may not meet my needs, even if I think the fabric will probably look fantastic. or maybe I just need to see it as a late autumn/early winter/early spring coat.
It is hard to say before the coat is made, as at this stage, all I have to go on are bolts of the cloth in 25m lengths.

It's a chunky tweed, that's for sure.

The yarn is very thick and very gnarly, because of the nature of the Herdwick fleece, so can't be woven into a dense cloth (which you need for a heavyweight cloth) without causing problems — the act of weaving it in itself, but also to make something that has drape and float requisite for apparel, as compared to e.g. a carpet.

By comparison, the natte tweed we used for the trench last time — well, you wouldn't believe it was the weight it was, because it was quite thin. But while the yarn was comparatively fine, it was very, very dense. The inverse is true of the Herdwick, and likewise the Donegal tweed we use for the balmacaan. It is extremely chunky, but not woven super tightly.

When it is made into a trench, my reckoning is that it'll be an impressively heavy, chunky winter coat — one that I would wear through late autumn, winter, and the most early (chilly) days of spring here in London. The trench is itself a big coat, and double-breasted, with a high collar, and the ability to be tied close to the body with the belt. It'll be substantial indeed.
 

sehkelly

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It is hard to say before the coat is made, as at this stage, all I have to go on are bolts of the cloth in 25m lengths.

It's a chunky tweed, that's for sure.

The yarn is very thick and very gnarly, because of the nature of the Herdwick fleece, so can't be woven into a dense cloth (which you need for a heavyweight cloth) without causing problems — the act of weaving it in itself, but also to make something that has drape and float requisite for apparel, as compared to e.g. a carpet.

By comparison, the natte tweed we used for the trench last time — well, you wouldn't believe it was the weight it was, because it was quite thin. But while the yarn was comparatively fine, it was very, very dense. The inverse is true of the Herdwick, and likewise the Donegal tweed we use for the balmacaan. It is extremely chunky, but not woven super tightly.

When it is made into a trench, my reckoning is that it'll be an impressively heavy, chunky winter coat — one that I would wear through late autumn, winter, and the most early (chilly) days of spring here in London. The trench is itself a big coat, and double-breasted, with a high collar, and the ability to be tied close to the body with the belt. It'll be substantial indeed.
... all of which is to skirt around the main point I set out to make, in that weight does not equal warmth!

The Herdwick tweed is hairy, gnarly, and will trap warm air like there's no tomorrow. The nature of the yarn, and the fibre, has a huge bearing on its winter readiness, and weight is only part of the story.
 

sehkelly

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We have begun making some new shirts for the autumn — hopefully for completion towards the end of the month.

There is the usual moleskin and cord (in quite light colours, which for us is a break from the norm) ...

... and then one quite unusual one, which is a Bedford cord made with fine worsted yarn. We have made shirts with worsteds before, and Bedford cords before, but never at the same time! There are two colours, both of them quite mottled — a lead grey which looks like it's been coloured in with pencil, and a denim which has a nice "faded" look to it, too. The grooves of the weave are highlighted by being slightly darker, and I hope the final effect on the shirt will be an interesting one.

New popovers, too — in cord, for the first time.
 

RozenKristal

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We have begun making some new shirts for the autumn — hopefully for completion towards the end of the month.

There is the usual moleskin and cord (in quite light colours, which for us is a break from the norm) ...

... and then one quite unusual one, which is a Bedford cord made with fine worsted yarn. We have made shirts with worsteds before, and Bedford cords before, but never at the same time! There are two colours, both of them quite mottled — a lead grey which looks like it's been coloured in with pencil, and a denim which has a nice "faded" look to it, too. The grooves of the weave are highlighted by being slightly darker, and I hope the final effect on the shirt will be an interesting one.

New popovers, too — in cord, for the first time.
Oh, a denim shirt?
 

sehkelly

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Oh, a denim shirt?
Oh right, no — it's denim in colour only.

And even then, well, it won't be called "denim" in colour when it appears on the website, to avoid the very misunderstanding we're having now!

And isn't denim itself indigo in colour? Hmm.
 

sehkelly

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The shirtmaker admonishing me for choosing too-thick moleskin for our next batch of shirts (though the spread collar does look good) reminds me ...

... we've some new photographs of our shirts in linen being worn on humankind. These are both made with what we called linen oxford, in the pleasingly dark and saturated shades of deep sea blue and bister brown.

shirt-granddad-linen-oxford-deep-sea-blue-2s@2x.jpg

shirt-granddad-linen-oxford-bister-worn-2s@2x.jpg

shirt-granddad-linen-oxford-deep-sea-blue-1s@2x.jpg

shirt-granddad-linen-oxford-deep-sea-blue-3s@2x.jpg

shirt-granddad-linen-oxford-bister-worn-1s@2x.jpg


As with all of our linen shirts right now, the cloth has been mercerised and sanforised so it doesn't behave much like normal linen shirting, but rather withstands continual (reasonable) washing and still maintains its handle and ability to withstand creasing.

I've a popover made with the stuff on now and while it has lost so much colour over the years it looks as if Indiana Jones costume, it still drapes as cleanly as the day it was made.
 

sehkelly

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Here is the latest mockup of the new Stockman / duster coat, which will debut in a few weeks, and is the newest addition to our line-up of "large coats with raglan sleeves" ...

stockman-duster-sample-factory-1@2x.jpg


This one has a one-piece sleeve, the same as the trench coat, and is in my book the most simple but satisfying of sleeves. Here the sleeves are capped with a second layer at the shoulder, and though you can't see it here, there's a deep storm yoke at the back, too.

And then there are the pockets, with which there's a little trompe-l'oeil: you're looking at four pockets here, though it appears of course only two.

Coming along in August, I hope, in a couple of colours of stay-wax cotton from Scotland.
 

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