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Running everyday and weight lifting?

Ben Karschnick

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Based on my experience, and what I have learned from others, cardio will only help never harm weightlifting. While a lot of running may lessen your SIZE gains, it will not necessarily lessen your STRENGTH gains. Also, there is NOTHING more important for overall body strength than lower body lifting, aka DEADS AND SQUATS!!!!!!! You should be doing an equal amount of deads and squats(and accompanying lifts) as bench press( and accompanying lifts). Gaining or losing fat depends almost 100% on your diet, you can eat a crap load of food to keep your body fueled without gaining fat if you eat the right foods.


the reason bodybuilders dont run isnt because theyre too big so they cant, its because they WANT to be too big so they DONT. I am not coming up with this on my own, I will quote a professional bodybuilder: "I find that if I do lots of running my legs actually get smaller." Notice he didnt say WEAKER, simply SMALLER. everyone needs to understand the difference between BODYBUILDING and STRENGTH TRAINING, because the two are COMPLETELY different. Although gaining size generally means gaining strength, and gaining strength generally means gaining size, a person that only cares about gaining SIZE will workout completely different than a person who only cares about STRENGTH. This may not be common knowledge but once you understand this is makes perfect sense, compare bodybuilders to power lifters: they way they look and they way they workout is totally different.

Heres a basic example of the two basic different types of workouts, given to me by a professional bodybuilder who trained himself and also trained professional powerlifters. To gain SIZE, the only thing that matters is time under tension, what this means if you dont already know is how long you are placing stress on your muscle, aka how long each set lasts for. The goal is to perform sets lasting 30-45 seconds and to achieve total failure at the end. The rep range should be around 8, so for a 40 second set, each rep should last about 5 seconds. You should PUSH as fast as you possibly can, and then bring the weight back down VERY slowly. To put this in perspective, most workout programs that tell you to do "slow" sets, will prescribe a cadence of one second up, two seconds down. even at 15 reps, this would only put you at the BOTTOM of the spectrum for what is necessary to gain size.

On the contrary, a powerlifter is going to blast through each rep as fast as possible, and most powerlifters on most of their workouts will probably stay around 5 reps or under, and stop just before achieving absolute failure.

Also, for either type of workout, unless youre on steriods or tons of supplements(which most pros are which is why many of them only workout each muscle group once a week), the more often you workout each muscle the more it can grow. The key is not to push your muscles too hard on each workout. You want to BARELY break down your muscles each time, then let them heal and break them down again as soon as possible. Its by doing theses babysteps you experience large gains over a period of time. For example, if you want to do ten sets a week, you could do ten sets once a week, but it would be better to do 5 sets twice a week, and even better to do 3 sets three times per week.
 

lawyerdad

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Based on my experience, and what I have learned from others, cardio will only help never harm weightlifting.  While a lot of running may lessen your SIZE gains, it will not necessarily lessen your STRENGTH gains. 

I don't claim to have definitive knowledge of the ultimate question. But you do realize that your second sentence doesn't support your first? Saying that a lot of running doesn't "necessarily" limit strength gains (even if you assume the truth of that statement) doesn't lead to the conclusion that "cardio will only help never harm . . ."

And just on a very fundamental level:
1. Some people do care about size gains.
2. Presumably if you're burning more calories than you're taking in, it's going to be pretty hard to keep gaining strength, which does require some muscle-building.
 

Ben Karschnick

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I don't claim to have definitive knowledge of the ultimate question. But you do realize that your second sentence doesn't support your first? Saying that a lot of running doesn't "necessarily" limit strength gains (even if you assume the truth of that statement) doesn't lead to the conclusion that "cardio will only help never harm . . ."

And just on a very fundamental level:
1. Some people do care about size gains.
2. Presumably if you're burning more calories than you're taking in, it's going to be pretty hard to keep gaining strength, which does require some muscle-building.




My post was carefully thought out and as a whole still makes sense to me after re-reading. I could have obviously gone into much greater detail about things but I was trying to avoid writing a larger book than I already did. If you have a question about something you want to ask, i would happy to discuss, but if you just want to nitpick things or start an argument I'm not interested. Thanks
 
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lawyerdad

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Hybridp

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Anyone run everyday and do a lot of weight lifting? I've been told cardio is ok while trying to gain muscle and also by others it's bad for muscle growth. I've started a "split set", where I lift upper body 4 days a week. I've been eating more and gaining muscle but I don't want to gain any fat with it. Also I love to run, nothing feels better than going 5 or 6 miles.

Long,slow distance running like you speak of is going to definitely impede muscle growth more than getting cardio from short sprints and conditioning/cardio from resistance workouts (circuit workouts, crossfit type stuff). You're elevating cortisol and decreasing some good hormonal output like testosterone and HGH during long slow distance. But high intensity exercise will boost HGH over five fold for several hours post-exercise which puts the body in a perfect environment for burning fat and building muscle.

But if you're going to stick to long distance running that much its best to simply ensure caloric intake is high enough so that you don't overtrain yourself. But your efforts are best allocated in the high intensity category for cardio.
 

Flight

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Some interesting replies in this thread... haha


In my experience, running has been very good alongside weight lifting. In the end, it's calories in vs calories out, and depending on your goal, you should decide how to use both accordingly. Obviously if you're trying to gain muscle, you want to work with a surplus of calories, and running might not be the best thing for you. Weight lifting alone burns quite a few calories, so running as well is just adding to "calories out." As far as stunting muscle growth; that's a complete myth.


My only tip is that, if you're trying to build muscle, save the running for AFTER your workout. I used to run 20 minutes before each workout, and I found that it depleted my glycogen stores and made my workout a little tougher. Now I skip for a couple of minutes to loosen up, stretch for 5 minutes (lightly, but thoroughly), do my 45 minute weight lifting routine, and finish off with a brisk 15 minute run on the treadmill at 5-6 MPH. Rest is your best friend in weight lifting.
 

kayhill

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^ Sensible response.
I'm very sorry to hear that.
To be fair his point about strength not equating to size is quite correct. Otherwise Olympic lifters would be gigantic body builder types ... while they obviously do have size, a lot of strength comes down to technique and mental aspects.

On the debate about running and lifting, I don't see how anyone can say the two aren't compatible. Sure, as you get bigger, and heavier, your ability to run will obviously decrease, as will your agility. But, I don't believe the gist of the question is: 'Can I improve my distance running times, while also getting big and ripped?' You can run the way an average person does to keep fit while getting gains. Just make sure you rest and have a very good diet.
 

lawyerdad

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To be fair his point about strength not equating to size is quite correct.
I never suggested otherwise. It's also quite correct that an ounce of feathers and an ounce of lead weigh the same. Neither is directly responsive to the OP, though.
 

JLibourel

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I think a regimen of distance running and weight training can be combined to very good effect. I like to think I did so during my "best" years physically--between ages 35 and 42. I alternated between some pretty serious total body workouts with the weights and running on off nights. I worked up to running 10 miles in town and often 16 at the beach, followed by long swims. I also did a great deal of hiking in the mountains in those days, sometimes covering as much as 18 or 20 miles a day.

I am not trying to brag here. I would have been a joke on a posing platform, but I did have what I like to think was a muscular, shapely, attractive physique. I wouldn't have been remotely competitive in powerlifting competition, much less in weightlifting, but I was still a helluva lot stronger than most of the adult male population. In a marathon I am sure I would have come lumbering in after the four hour mark. Nonetheless, I had excellent endurance,, especially for a big man, and was very vigorous and energetic.

Realistically, most of us simply do not have the physical potential to become physique champions or serious competitors in powerlifting or weightlifting. Nor are most of us, no matter how hard we try, ever going to win a marathon, box professionally for a title, play for the NBA, NFL, major league baseball or whatever. That's just the way it is. Most of us realize this while we are still in high school. What we can do make the best of our natural physical potential, and I think the best way to do this is with a balanced regimen combining strength training with cardio/endurance and some flexibility work thrown in. Just my $.02.
 

slambooy

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I have been running almost every day this year and lifting weights on a 6 day routine.. I'm 6' and 185 lbs. Yes it is possible to maintain solid muscle and even gain muscle while running with your lifting. I run at least 5K a day (3.1 miles). I do make sure I eat a lot. My advice is to listen to your body, and if you need a rest day take it. No harm in pushing a workout till the next day. To answer the question though, yes it is very possible to do both.

Sam
 

iphonedanok

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good info,Just wanted to gain muscle mass and enjoys running. You can do both very easily.thanks
 
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ImTheGroom

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Only just skimmed the last page of this thread, but a couple of important facts are likely missing. You can definitely gain muscle mass and improve your cardiovascular endurance simultaneously. You should be aware that a person can only gain 2-3 lbs of MUSCLE every year. The rest of the weight and size you gain is primarily water. Running seven days/week is equivalent to running four or five days per week, because it does not allow the rest period during which supercompensation occurs. Six days is your peak, if you are just running. I am not as familiar with the research on the combination of running and resistance training, but it stands to reason that one needs to be more mindful of building in rest. And, for the sake of the credibility of my argument, I will mention I have a master's degree in kinesiology.
 

MMoon24

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I think a lot of factors have to come into play. You have to be in tip top condition, be dedicated to your diet, and routine. With that being said, I also value "recovery time" so running or lifting on a constant basis would be too much and would result in burnout.

Personally, I fast for a month, once per year due to religious reasons. I end up losing about 8-10 lbs, and I always feel like I'm starting all over cardio and lifting wise. I just recently got back to where I was strength wise, and now I'm having to incorporate my basketball endurance in. Not easy.
 

ImTheGroom

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The rest period is absolutely necessary; that is when the body actually dedicates its resources to changing its physiology, so that is when you are actually making the gains. The body is preparing for the next round of abuse.
 

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