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Ruined cashmere... Need anti-moth recommendations

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by yywwyy, Oct 23, 2012.

  1. yywwyy

    yywwyy Senior member

    Messages:
    1,750
    Joined:
    May 8, 2011
    Location:
    NY
    Hey guys,

    I never thought this would happen to me because I'm usually meticulous with my clothes and my cleanliness is said to be next to godliness. However, one of my drawers seem to be problematic and my cashmere sweaters have been eaten. This is the first time I've had this problem. I'm quite surprised because these sweaters were new and stored for wear this winter; I've heard moth larvae are attracted to the "nutrients" that's stuck to worn clothing.

    In any case, I've done some searches but found them unsatisfactory. I've kept these sweaters with small cedar balls, but I was skeptical when I got them because they didn't smell much. Could you recommend some higher quality, specific moth-control products for me, that you know are effective based on experience? I really want to avoid those foul-smelling moth balls/products, unless they're the only solution. My main closet is air conditioned and I store my cedar shoe-trees there, and perhaps as a result, nothing in there have been damaged- However, I definitely want to reinforce my protection in every way possible.

    Also, what should I do with potentially-affected clothing and furniture? Is there a way to kill any larvae that may still be hiding in my drawer? Are they even visible?


    Thanks.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2012
  2. Johnboy

    Johnboy Senior member

    Messages:
    250
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2012
    Napthalene balls work very well but are toxic, and Camphor oil also works very well and may be a better option. Check them out on Wikipedia.
     
  3. yywwyy

    yywwyy Senior member

    Messages:
    1,750
    Joined:
    May 8, 2011
    Location:
    NY
    Napthalene balls are the white stuff that smells really badly, right? I want to avoid those as the smell gives me headaches. Will check out Camphor oil.

    I've decided to pack my potentially affected woolens in plastic bags and store them in the freezer for a while, to kill any larvae that may be present on them. Has anyone tried this?
     
  4. Artking3

    Artking3 Senior member

    Messages:
    456
    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2008
    I recommend cedar wood blocks. You do need to refresh cedar wood every few months by sanding them or spraying them with cedar wood spray.
     
  5. philosophe

    philosophe Senior member

    Messages:
    4,892
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    Oct 20, 2004
    I'm pretty sure that freezing for a long period will do the job. Drycleaning the items would also work. In my house, we send all of the cold weather wool stuff to the cleaners at the end of the season and then put the clean clothes in moth-proof bags or boxes. No casualties so far.
     

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