Rubber anti-slip soles for leather soles

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by My View, Jan 19, 2004.

  1. My View

    My View Senior member

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    I have got a cobbler to add to several of my leather-soled shoes:

    1) a rubber anti-slip sole (which totally covers the first half of the whole sole)

    2) a metal piece at the tip of the sole to reduce wear and tear and "chipping" when you accidentally kick your shoes against the stairs.

    For several of my other leather-soled shoes, I took the advice of purists (and the manufacturers) not to stick anything.

    What do you guys think?

    The usual arguments against adding the rubber soles are:
    1) It distorts the "balance" of the shoe
    2) It prevents the shoe from "breathing" and you end up with feet which are more moist/wet

    On point 1), I find my shoes equally comfortable to wear with/without the rubber soles and walking has never been a problem. Looks wise, the add-on may add perhaps 2 or 3 mm to the thickness of the whole sole which in most cases seem quite harmless

    On point 2), the leather soles have been bark-tanned and hammered and I wonder if the pores in the sole really still "breathes".

    Or do you suspect this whole anti-rubber sole thingy is really a form of shoe manufacturers wanting to protect their interest (to get more business from you re-soling your shoe or buying more shoes when these soles wear out)?

    Rubber anti-slip soles are really practical because walking on slippery floor (such as well-polished marble flooring in office lobbies, pedestrian walkway after a rain etc.). If anyone has had an experience of slipping and falling due to slippery soles (in the process, dirtying his beautiful shirt/pants not to mention making a fool of himself), he will probably throw out the whole "purist" idealogy and attach rubber soles to all his shoes.

    Comments anyone?
     


  2. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I suppose I am one of these Purists. It's to me like those people who use their upholstered furniture only with plastic covers.

    Mind you, I have shoes with rubber soles (so designed, not adapted) to potter about in the rain.
     


  3. My View

    My View Senior member

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    The problem is where I live (Singapore), it rains quite often and when it rains, it pours... In some season, it would rain almost everyday (though only for a few hours each time) for a week consecutively.

    I want to wear my nice shoes without the anti-slip rubber sole add-ons but am afraid that:

    1) my shoes get very wet (since the leather sole is not water-proof)

    2) I will slip and fall (happened to me quite a few times)

    So my decision to have this add-ons is based almost entirely on practicality. For some of my nicer shoes, I choose to be a "purist".
     


  4. esvoboda

    esvoboda Well-Known Member

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    OK, I can understand the arguments both for and against having rubber sole protecters added.

    However, are there any arguments against adding those metal plates to the front of the sole? I had (unfortunately destroyed at home by accident) a pair of JM Westons that had one of these tips standard. It seemed to do a great job of reducing wear at the front of the sole. I don´t recall if the tip was recessed. What are your thoughts on having a cobbler add one to a pair that doesn´t have one?

    Thanks.

    -Ed
     


  5. itzamazing

    itzamazing Senior member

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    I do it and it really seems to extend the life of my shoes.

    I live in a walking city (New York) and these streets can be brutal on your feet. I find that the rubber soles do not disturb the balance or look of the shoe (you cannot even see the sole, and it looks much more attractive than a scuffed bottom). I did not do it before and after a day of riding the subway, walking to and from work, my new shoes would look terrible and worn.

    If anyone does have any reason not to do it, I would be interested to know.
     


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