Rory Duffy Bespoke - A Savile Row master tailor in NYC

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Montauk, Mar 13, 2013.

  1. taxgenius

    taxgenius Senior member

    Messages:
    4,869
    Likes Received:
    304
    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2007
    

    Thankfully yes.
     


  2. Eustace Tilley

    Eustace Tilley Senior member

    Messages:
    6,452
    Likes Received:
    308
    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2007
    Location:
    New York
    Quote:In this context, a 'master' tailor is simply one who knows how to both cut and tailor all the major bespoke outfits (lounge suit, white tie / tails, morning suit etc.). Typically, people specialize as either cutters of tailors, and some are often not trained to work on the more complex pieces like tails.
     


  3. David Reeves

    David Reeves Affiliate Vendor Affiliate Vendor

    Messages:
    3,122
    Likes Received:
    2,076
    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Location:
    New York
    

    True. Theoretically after 7 years as a journey man though you had learned everything from your master and were equipped to make all those items. Of course not many tailors apprentice for so long these days and of course there has always been specializations and this is more the norm now.

    A lot of the time the master tailor runs the house and he would train his apprentice as his successor. Meanwhile you would have finishers, cutters etc as well. Interestingly Robert Gieves was a master tailor.
     


  4. Hacking jacket

    Hacking jacket Senior member

    Messages:
    197
    Likes Received:
    19
    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2013
    Location:
    London
    Why was I told the a tailor apprenticeship was 4 years? Is this outside Savile Row or is a subdivision of a 'journey man'
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2013


  5. Montauk

    Montauk Senior member

    Messages:
    455
    Likes Received:
    32
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Location:
    NYC


  6. comrade

    comrade Senior member

    Messages:
    6,021
    Likes Received:
    335
    Joined:
    May 10, 2005
    Location:
    Menlo Park, CA
    That's a beautiful blue coat. A welcome corrective to the short, close-fitting
    "Italian" garments that populate Style Forum these days. Not my style though.
     


  7. mack11211

    mack11211 Senior member

    Messages:
    6,454
    Likes Received:
    73
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    Location:
    Brooklyn USA
    Can someone explain to me this bit from Duffy:

    What/where is the crook in his cut?
     


  8. Montauk

    Montauk Senior member

    Messages:
    455
    Likes Received:
    32
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Location:
    NYC
    

    The distinction between a "crooked" vs a "straight" coat seems a bit ambiguously defined, and I've read differing descriptions from folks who all know how to cut a fine coat. I understand it as Rory has explained it to me with the rule of thumb he learned:

    "Crooken on, straighten off."

    This refers to how the foreparts hang. To "crooken" a forepart is to slightly swing it from the neckpoint inward toward the centerline such that it will remain more closed (or "on") even when unbuttoned. A "straightened" forepart will be be swung slightly outward from the centerline such that it will hang open (or "off") when unbuttoned.

    As I understand it, Anderson & Sheppard (and those who trained there like Tom Mahon) tend to cut a straight coat, with much of their famous chest drape being pulled into being by the button fastening itself. I asked Mahon about this several years ago during a demonstration he was giving in NYC and he confirmed that he believed the button "should be doing something" by pulling the coat into shape, and that he didn't mind the bit of visible "pull" on the center button this entails. (For the record, nor do I, and nor do many iconic dressers in the pantheon.)

    Proponents of crooked coats like Rory prefer to build their shape and drape into the coat without relying on the button fastening to do anything.

    Neither technique is superior, per se--it comes down to a matter of personal preference and style. A coat for a SB 3 pc suit might well be cut straight to be worn unbuttoned and feature the waistcoat more. My own impression is that a crooked coat is more traditional, and more elegant when buttoned, but somewhat fusty-looking when worn unbuttoned (i.e. non-traditionally).

    Anyway, I apologize in advance if I've made a hash of this explanation and encourage anyone to correct me where I may be mistaken.
    For a more detailed (and highly confusing) technical examination of subject, check out this thread on the Cutter & Tailor forum.
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2013


  9. unbelragazzo

    unbelragazzo Jewfro Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    8,373
    Likes Received:
    4,565
    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    FWIW my Steed (A&S expat) has a TON of shaping even when not buttoned.
     


  10. Montauk

    Montauk Senior member

    Messages:
    455
    Likes Received:
    32
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Location:
    NYC
    

    I definitely don't mean to suggest that straight coats don't have shape--just that that shape might be enhanced by buttoning in a manner that a crooked coat (for better or for worse) isn't. How does your coat hang when unbuttoned?

    In any case, like most binary distinctions in bespoke tailoring, I suspect that the straight/crooked dichotomy can be overstated. In the end I think most cutters and tailors are trying to make their clients look good, and that this end can be arrived at through different systems or approaches.
     


  11. ctp120

    ctp120 Senior member

    Messages:
    682
    Likes Received:
    485
    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2009
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2013


  12. unbelragazzo

    unbelragazzo Jewfro Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    8,373
    Likes Received:
    4,565
    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Location:
    Washington, DC


  13. jefferyd

    jefferyd Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    1,441
    Likes Received:
    346
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2008
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    

    You've got it backward. The neckpoint itself is being moved; when moving it toward the center line, it is being straightened, when moving away from the center line it is being crookened.
     


  14. Butler

    Butler Senior member

    Messages:
    827
    Likes Received:
    2,063
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2009
    Location:
    CPH



    A Master tailor has completed apprenticeships both as a cutter and a tailor, AND has established his own business! :bigstar:
     


  15. comrade

    comrade Senior member

    Messages:
    6,021
    Likes Received:
    335
    Joined:
    May 10, 2005
    Location:
    Menlo Park, CA
    

    Are the shoulders typical of Steed?
    They seem a bit roped to me.
     


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by