Road bike suggestions?

Discussion in 'Health & Body' started by imageWIS, Sep 7, 2006.

  1. aarghh

    aarghh Senior member

    Messages:
    270
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2004
    Location:
    San Jose, CA
    One thing you might consider if you ever intend to use the bike for touring is the presence of lugs for saddlebags and such.
     


  2. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

    Messages:
    20,008
    Likes Received:
    97
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2004
    Location:
    New York City / Buenos Aires
    One thing you might consider if you ever intend to use the bike for touring is the presence of lugs for saddlebags and such.
    Nah, most rides will consist of: home to starting point on A1A (the road along the ocean), riding South or North (depending where I feel like going that day), coming back to my starting point on A1A and riding back home. Jon.
     


  3. A Y

    A Y Senior member

    Messages:
    5,595
    Likes Received:
    380
    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2006
    Location:
    Southern California
    Why not put slicks on your XC bike? I do that on my MTB that I use for commuting, and it works great.

    --Andre
     


  4. Matt

    Matt [email protected]

    Messages:
    11,179
    Likes Received:
    114
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2005
    Location:
    Sunny Saigon
    Can I ride them under my own power?

    Jon.

    why on earth would you want to do that? you can push them if you really want to.
     


  5. Aaron

    Aaron Senior member

    Messages:
    1,153
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2004
    Location:
    Vancouver and ?
    By “upgrading the frameset” do you mean components?
    I meant upgrading things like bottom brackets, headsets, forks, seat posts, etc. C-Dale makes an well engineered and constructed frame, but as far as I know in the past, used propertary sizes for their forks, seatposts, bottom brackets etc. so you're basically stuck with whatever they gave you. If you want to upgrade into lighter and/or better parts you're SOL. I don't know if this is still the case, but upgrading doesn't seem to be a priorty to you so... A.
     


  6. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

    Messages:
    20,008
    Likes Received:
    97
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2004
    Location:
    New York City / Buenos Aires
    I meant upgrading things like bottom brackets, headsets, forks, seat posts, etc. C-Dale makes an well engineered and constructed frame, but as far as I know in the past, used propertary sizes for their forks, seatposts, bottom brackets etc. so you're basically stuck with whatever they gave you. If you want to upgrade into lighter and/or better parts you're SOL. I don't know if this is still the case, but upgrading doesn't seem to be a priorty to you so...

    A.


    Well, not SOL, there are adapter rings (how else do they use Shimano components?)...but yeah, the usage of adapter rings is a necessity. At the same time, since I don't want to upgrade, I am unsure as to what to get.

    The C-Dale R700 the dealer had (which I tested and was really fast) has a CAAD 8 frame, which I have read online is a better frame than the 1500's SLR, but the 1500 has Shimano 105's all around (9 spd), whereas the R700 uses 105's, except for the crank, which is a TruVatiV Elita 2.2 and the rear derailleur, which is Ultegra (so, it shifts like the 105, but weighs less).

    At the same time the new CAAD 9 uses 105's all around...but I'm now looking at about $1600!

    Also, any advice as to how the bike should fit? According to the 3 dealers I went to they all said I was a 52cm, but I felt like I was putting a lot of weight onto my shoulders when I tested the R700: am I just not used to riding in that position?

    Jon.
     


  7. Renault78law

    Renault78law Senior member

    Messages:
    2,141
    Likes Received:
    63
    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2003
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    I wouldn't worry about it too much. Lots of factors to consider. Seat position, seat angle, seat height, stem height, stem lengh, stem angle, handlebar angle, placement of hoods. They'll fit you when you buy the bike (at least I hope they do) to make it comfy. You should be able to find the exact same position on either frame with minor adjustments.
     


  8. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

    Messages:
    20,008
    Likes Received:
    97
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2004
    Location:
    New York City / Buenos Aires
    I wouldn't worry about it too much. Lots of factors to consider. Seat position, seat angle, seat height, stem height, stem lengh, stem angle, handlebar angle, placement of hoods. They'll fit you when you buy the bike (at least I hope they do) to make it comfy. You should be able to find the exact same position on either frame with minor adjustments.

    Well, everyone said that the 50cm was too small...all the shops I went to will fit me and adjust everything as needed.

    Jon.
     


  9. ATM

    ATM Senior member

    Messages:
    432
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2005
    Location:
    Detroit suburbs
    And? Info?

    Jon.

    Seem like a pretty good value. I also like the compact crankset - 50-34 instead of 52-39.

    http://www.feltracing.com
     


  10. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

    Messages:
    20,008
    Likes Received:
    97
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2004
    Location:
    New York City / Buenos Aires
    I wouldn't worry about it too much. Lots of factors to consider. Seat position, seat angle, seat height, stem height, stem lengh, stem angle, handlebar angle, placement of hoods. They'll fit you when you buy the bike (at least I hope they do) to make it comfy. You should be able to find the exact same position on either frame with minor adjustments.

    Update:

    I tried both the Trek 1500 and the C-Dale R700, and here are my pros and cons:

    R700:

    Pros) Great frame, 23c tires, faster than the 1500, probably due to the thinner tire size and frame lightness, ultrega rear derailleur felt a tiny bit smoother than the 1500's 105, but it was really negligible

    Cons) Could not fit right on the bike; first time I took it out I felt all the weight on my shoulders, so the shop tried a shorter stem and tilted the hoods up a bit and made sure the seat wasn't angled back, which instead of relieving the weight from my shoulders, shifted the weight to my upper back / lower neck.

    1500:

    Pros) All-around good bike, it has a better (IMHO) crank than the R700, Shimano 105 vs. SRAM Truvativ, I was able to fit properly on it and it did not feel like all the weight was on my shoulders.

    Cons) Not as fast as the R700; frame is obviously not as well made as the C-Dale's.

    Conclusions: like the C-Dale more, but I felt the weight on my shoulders with the long stem and I felt the weight of my upper back / lower neck with the shorter stem...is it just that the R700 needs to be fine tuned to me, OR should I get the 1500 since I was able to ride on it without any problems?

    Jon.
     


  11. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

    Messages:
    20,008
    Likes Received:
    97
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2004
    Location:
    New York City / Buenos Aires
    Anyone?

    Jon.
     


  12. Zeriman

    Zeriman Active Member

    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    3
    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2006
    Location:
    Alhambra, CA
    I always think it is strange that people who are new to road bikes want to buy an new one. You will learn so much after riding one for a while. Everytime you take it in to the shop for a tune up you learn more. If you go on group rides you learn much, much more from the other riders. Then you add the fact that new features and technology are coming out all the time. I can pretty much garantee that you will out grow any bike you purchased now within a year just because you will find out more about what would work for you.

    Bikes depreciate just like cars. Take a new bike out of the shop and instantly it depreciates 25%. Why not go on craigslist or a bike forum and get a nice used bike. After having it a while and learning about what you like and don't like, and what will really work for you, you can sell it (and probably get back 90% of what you paid) and get something perfect.
     


  13. twblalock

    twblalock Active Member

    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2006
    You seem to fit better on the Trek, which is very important. If changing the Cannondale stem didn't help, then you should not get that bike. You won't be faster on it if you are in pain.

    If you don't like the rear derailer or tire size, those are trivial to change. You can easily do it yourself or just get the shop to do it before you buy the bike. They might give a discount.

    Get the 1500 and have them slap on an Ultegra rear derailer.

    I personally think that the Trek frames are about as good as the Cannondale frames. Exposed welds and the like have nothing to do with quality, believe it or not. Quality of a bike frame is determined by the quality of the tubing used and the geometry of the frame "diamond" (ie the length of the tubes and the angles between them).
     


  14. jwm

    jwm New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2006
    Location:
    Bay Area, California
    You get more bike for the buck with Giant. Specialized gives good value as well. Both offer compact frames which should feel compatible with your mountain bike. My sympathies on losing your favorite trail. I'm a mountain biker too. Good luck.
     


  15. Aaron

    Aaron Senior member

    Messages:
    1,153
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2004
    Location:
    Vancouver and ?
    I would also say get a used bike at first, but if you must buy new buy what fits you. In the future you'll start making excuses not to ride because the bike doesn't fit and causes you pain. Good luck.
     


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by