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Resume Formats

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by deadly7, Jan 9, 2011.

  1. deadly7

    deadly7 Senior member

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    Having worked in finance (and looking for finance internships now) I've heard from recruiters at major firms as well as my own career services department that 1 page is assumed. If you have that many jobs and truly feel each job has relevant experience (and can't trim it) then I guess you have no choice but to go over one page. Just make sure that each job is worth going over the one page...the reason for one page is that recruiters get a ton of resumes and it is easier for them to have a simple, one pager than reading through two pages.

    But, if you are exemplary, two pages might be necessary.

    I seldom deal with recruiters as of now, so I have a different need. It makes sense from your context that you would put yours down to one page (where possible), though.

    By buzzwords (phrases) i mean stuff like "core competencies" and "interpsersonal skills".
    You should use specific terms to describe skills, like your excel example. My point is simply that if I'm reading a lot of resumes trite phrases that do nothing but fill the pages with words, while making you sound phony and too rehearsed, will probably get an eye roll. Again it comes down to where you're interviewing. Maybe some situations it helps.

    As for the hobbies etc. I think it can be worked in during the interview process but if it's relevant and makes you a bit unique then I'm sure it wouldn't hurt. I tend to avoid it so as to get as much relevant work experience in while still keeping the resume short and tight.

    Sooo I shouldn't have a qualification "i'm cool"? [​IMG]

    I usually list them, at least the position name. Every interview I've had has asked me questions on one or two of my volunteering experiences, and I can't say my volunteering [or leadership] experience is unique at all.
     


  2. kasper007

    kasper007 Senior member

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    I thought the same thing until I talked to a friend who does a lot of recruiting in finance/banking. It's just not possible for someone who has held multiple positions to fit everything into 1-page.

    i used to work in IB and was very involved with recruiting. I remember someone asking a question about resume length at a b-school presentation and our CEO (who by luck was present) almost cut the student off and answered:

    "my resume fits on one page, so can yours".

    experienced folks generally have some sort of presentation / memo where they elaborate on specifics deal experience, etc. But, this is never shared early in the recruiting process / at the same time as resume. The same goes for PE.
     


  3. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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    I suppose that depends on where you're applying. Not all resumes go onto a giant pile to be sifted through by HR.


    Correct. Oftentimes, resumes are sifted by computer algorithms first designed to look for buzzwords and then the 'good' results (oftentimes many 'good' resumes are rejected by the computer) are forwarded to HR people who will again look for buzzwords. [​IMG]
     


  4. Stu

    Stu Senior member

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    I can see why. I sometimes have it, sometimes I don't, depends on the job, really.

    I personally would not give a rat's ass about an objective if I were a hiring manger. Who cares if you "seek to find a challenging position to fulfill my aspirations to whatever." I recommend using that valuable real estate for a summary value statement, i.e.:

    Value statement
    Work Experience
    Education
    Certiufications, licenses, honors, awards, etc.
     


  5. deadly7

    deadly7 Senior member

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    i used to work in IB and was very involved with recruiting. I remember someone asking a question about resume length at a b-school presentation and our CEO (who by luck was present) almost cut the student off and answered:

    "my resume fits on one page, so can yours".

    experienced folks generally have some sort of presentation / memo where they elaborate on specifics deal experience, etc. But, this is never shared early in the recruiting process / at the same time as resume. The same goes for PE.

    Yes, and he can do this because he already has a large name -- he's a CEO at an educational institution. If he's going to get an interview he won't need more information than that on his resume. Everybody isn't so fortunate. This post is realms of stupid.

    Correct. Oftentimes, resumes are sifted by computer algorithms first designed to look for buzzwords and then the 'good' results (oftentimes many 'good' resumes are rejected by the computer) are forwarded to HR people who will again look for buzzwords. [​IMG]
    Yep.
     


  6. kasper007

    kasper007 Senior member

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    Yes, and he can do this because he already has a large name -- he's a CEO at an educational institution. If he's going to get an interview he won't need more information than that on his resume. Everybody isn't so fortunate. This post is realms of stupid.

    Where did i talk about the CEO of an educational institution.........

    From first-hand experience with a BB IB, i can tell you that one page resume are the norm for recruiting at all level, including at the MD / executive level. anyway, in finance, resume are very rarely handed directly as there's usually an intermediary (campus career service or HH) and they have the sense of not sending resumes over 1 page. And you're a little naive if you think a resume is all that is going to be asked from a prospective executive hire.......
     


  7. ashpool

    ashpool Senior member

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    I think volunteering / extra-curricular are important even if you have other job experience. Good conversation pieces.
     


  8. pseudonym

    pseudonym Senior member

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    I've talked to almost all of my professors about my resume and received a ton of tips/suggestions.

    After spending some time revising it over the break, I think I have my overall resume. Anybody care to take a look? I'm a sophomore trying to find a summer internship (major is Finance/Accounting).

    Thanks.
     


  9. Jr Mouse

    Jr Mouse Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I have been in the process of re-writing my own resume. Currently I think it's "good," but could be stronger. I'm not an expert and have a few questions myself, but I will give a little advice what I have learned over the years first.

    1. Yes, keep it to one page! Unless you have 15+ years of experience under your belt and have had multiple jobs, you are not writing an effective resume if you can't keep it to a single page. I think someone here said they are having trouble with space now that they are on their 4th job. That's nothing, to be blunt. Streamline and rewrite things as needed. Cut out the fat. Only senior level people in their careers should have a resume over a single page.

    2. Don't use a MS Word Template. Everyone uses those and your resume will have less of a chance of standing out.

    3. I send my resume as a PDF file whenever possible. Why? It guarantees my formatting will look correct when it is opened. I have seen too many errors with the .doc format over the years and you can believe that the person who opens your resume will assume the messed up formatting is your fault and shows a lack of attention to detail.

    4. Don't include your college GPA unless it was really good. If it was not, try to avoid even bringing it up.

    5. Try and keep your resume focused on experience relevant to your career or the job you are applying for. If you had to take a job waiting tables or working at Best Buy to pay your bills while job hunting, DON'T include it on your resume.

    6. Have two to three people proof read it for spelling and grammer. Just make sure you tell them that it is the only help you need. There is nothing more frustrating then finishing a resume re-write and having people nitpick your format. If you are happy and confident with it, then move forward.

    Now, I do have a question myself and would like some advice from the crowd. For the last last year and a half I have been working at a job outside of my career field. I'm a marketing/ad guy and am currently working at a financial office. It's something I kind of fell into when I got laid off from an old job and the economy was tanking. My concern is how to frame this on my resume so it does not show a lack of focus. I have also been doing some freelance work in my career field, but it's something I do part time when the work comes in.
     


  10. justinsmnz

    justinsmnz Senior member

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    I'm a third-year Advertising major and I'm currently sending out resumes for what will be my second summer internship at a large agency. I've cut my resume down to just three sections: Education, relevant experience, and relevant activities. By using these titles it's obvious that I have other experience and other activities, but only chose to share what applies for the specific position.

    Advertising is a far more creative field than finance/banking and even we are told to absolutely never go over a page (by career counselors at uni and HR reps at many agencies I've spoken with.) If you have additional info that you want to include but do not have room for, then either mention it in your cover letter or cut out some information from other positions to make room.

    As far as formatting goes, my resume is one sheet with .375" margins and the font size is approx. 11pt Adobe Garamond Pro with some bold headings. I print on a 100# matte white cardstock for both my cover letters and resume. It's heavy enough to stand out when shuffling through a stack, but not an obnoxious color or texture like most other stocks.
     


  11. HelloIDistance

    HelloIDistance Senior member

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    Here's the deal..my school has a site exclusively for alnumi and current students where employers hire from. In order to get your resume on the site it has to be submitted and approved. Mine got denied and the comments were. "I suggest using Times New Roman font as it's the standard resume font." WTF? I'm using Veranda, it looks fine. Is this real life? Does anyone else think this is over the top? It's not like I'm using comic sans or something ridiculous. [​IMG]
     


  12. Artisan Fan

    Artisan Fan Suitsupply-sider

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    Spend less time on the resume and more time completing your LinkedIn profile. [​IMG]
     


  13. patrick_b

    patrick_b Senior member

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    Spend less time on the resume and more time completing your LinkedIn profile. [​IMG]

    http://education.newsweek.com/2010/1...s-of-2010.html

    The Worse RÃ[​IMG]sumÃ[​IMG] Cliches of 2010

    Are you a results-oriented team player with a proven track record as a problem solver?

    So is everyone else on LinkedIn.

    The professional networking site today released its list of the most overused "buzzwords" from users' profiles, and the report reads like a laundry list of rÃ[​IMG]sumÃ[​IMG] clichÃ[​IMG]s. Topping the list for American users was "extensive experience," followed by such stalwarts as "innovative," "motivated" and "results-oriented."

    The company's analytics team also explored the most popular profile terms for users in other countries as well. Canadians shared Americans' emphasis on experience, while Brazilians sought to communicate to potential employers that they were "dynamic." And over in Europe, the French, Germans, Italians and Dutch all liked to emphasize how "innovative" they are.

    Here's the full list of overused Buzzwords by LinkedIn users in the U.S.:

    1. Extensive experience
    2. Innovative
    3. Motivated
    4. Results-oriented
    5. Dynamic
    6. Proven track record
    7. Team player
    8. Fast-paced
    9. Problem solver
    10. Entrepreneurial

    If your LinkedIn profile or rÃ[​IMG]sumÃ[​IMG] includes more than a couple of these words, you might want to consider using more original language to set yourself apart from the crowd. And be sure to check out MainStreet's list of other costly rÃ[​IMG]sumÃ[​IMG] mistakes.

    "” Matt Brownell, mainstreet.com




    http://blog.linkedin.com/2010/12/14/...ile-buzzwords/

    Did you use one of these 10 most overused buzzwords in your LinkedIn profile this year?

    "Wonder what really makes people cringe when they look at your LinkedIn Profile? It's those clichÃ[​IMG]d words and phrases. You know what they are "” those ambiguous ones that really don't tell you anything.

    As we head into 2011 our Analytics Team decided to take a crack at finding the most clichÃ[​IMG]d and overused phrases for the past year using over 85 million LinkedIn profiles. Here are our 2010 top 10 buzzwords used in the USA."

    Wonder what really makes people cringe when they look at your LinkedIn Profile? It's those clichÃ[​IMG]d words and phrases. You know what they are "” those ambiguous ones that really don't tell you anything.

    As we head into 2011 our Analytics Team decided to take a crack at finding the most clichÃ[​IMG]d and overused phrases for the past year using over 85 million LinkedIn profiles. Here are our 2010 top 10 buzzwords used in the USA.
     


  14. jfclarky

    jfclarky Senior member

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    I am a little late to this discussion. While some people have given you some great tips I use UPenn career service website for all my resume needs.

    http://www.vpul.upenn.edu/careerserv...documents.html

    most of the information people have posted, only the good stuff, is at the UPenn website.

    If you looking for a new job network, network, network, network. Have people check for grammar that is going to be your biggest mistake.

    Other than that I hope the website helps.
     


  15. ramuman

    ramuman Senior member

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    I hate serif fonts on resumes - they seem too pretentious. I prefer the sans serif fonts like Verdana, Tahoma, etc. I'm a bit of a typography nut though.
    Stick with Arial. Any attempt to look different by varying font will make you look insecure. Omit the objective statement. Omit your hobbies too.
    Not true. I use Tahoma (Verdana would be ok, but I think the character body is too wide and imposing) on my resume. There's nothing wrong with a little bit of individuality as long as it's within reasonable bounds. Also, I put one line (just a single line) about my hobbies in a professional, but witty manner at the end of my resume right before the references on request stuff. It came up in nearly every round of interviews (not with every interviewer, but with at least one of three) between the two companies I recently interviewed for...and it was always a great 30-60s conversation.
     


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