Resoling your shoes

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by retronotmetro, Jun 23, 2004.

  1. grimslade

    grimslade Senior member

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    For those that have used the AE resoling service, how did you go about specifying Rendenbach soles? If you sent in channeled soles, did they come back channeled, or stitched aloft? How would you know what soles were actually put on? Much as I like my AEs, I wouldn't want to mail in C&J handgrades (for example) and get back AE-soled shoes...
     


  2. well-kept

    well-kept Senior member

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    The repair shop in NYC is 'Shoe Service Plus' and they are very good. .

    Meaning no disrespect to your expertise and judgement but merely adding my own experience... I have NEVER had a pair of good shoes treated as barbarically anywhere. After what Shoe Service Plus did to a pair of my custom Lobbs I wouldn't allow them to change the laces let alone do a resole.
     


  3. well-kept

    well-kept Senior member

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    Rendenbach are much more expensive. Also, Rendenbach, at least in the past, insisted on stamping the grain side of their outsoles with their logo, which I doubt A/E would want on their work.

    AE uses them on their shell cordovans and they are so marked.
     


  4. LabelKing

    LabelKing Senior member

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    The repair shop in NYC is 'Shoe Service Plus' and they are very good. Specialty is ladies shoes, but do work on mens equally as well. I sent them a custom remake of a 70's zipper boot for a customer to have Cuban Heels done and they did it just the way it should be. However, there used to be a family operation in DC with a spot around Farragutt North Metro stop (forgot the name, but was Italian I believe). Are they still there? They used to be very good as well. There is another point to be made here. Shoes are not made as they once were - even the highly regarded factories are using materials and techniques that would have not been employed years ago. We have a local guy who does most of my work and he inherited the shop from his father. He has been repairing shoes for many, many years and shakes his head every time I go back in the shop as he shows me examples of constructions and leathers that make it very hard to repair in the 'proper' way. Shortages in fine materials are probably mostly to blame, and a manufacturer can't control that, but many times there is only so much a cobbler can do, at the price most will pay. One example he deals with every day is heel lifts. Used to be a good shoe's heel base was built up of good quality (i.e. consistent) leather and was an easy and common job to remove the top-lift and replace while the customer waited - usually during lunch break. Now, you peel the top-lift off and it pulls half the heel base with it as they are using 'paper' layers that are mainly glue. 'Paper' meaning cheap, thin leather - splits that used to be discarded. He had a pair of Alden shoes yesterday he showed me where they had run the stitch so close to the edge of the welt around the toe that it is virtually impossible to stitch a new sole on. There is as much a chance of blowing out the welt as getting the job right. Now this customer thinks he has a great shoe - rightfully so - but what can the cobbler do? He explains the situation and the customer walks out thinking the repair guy just can't do the work, he's no good. So, it's not always the repair people. It's a combination of declining manufacturing quality, decreased customer awareness of quality and what is reasonable, tremendous decrease in availability of quality materials, while prices increase every season which makes the general customer that much more demanding of the product. It aint easy...
    This is interesting and rather telling.

    So how do makers like Edward Green and Silvano Lattanzi utilize efficently old resoling methods in relation to a presumed decrease in quality?
     


  5. lhooq

    lhooq Senior member

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    Considering that I just got a brand new pair of RLPL Mackays for $285, and the pound's at $1.94, I'd be better off just buying a new pair of shoes instead of shipping them to EG for resoling (if and when that time comes).
     


  6. dirk diggler

    dirk diggler Senior member

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    Considering that I just got a brand new pair of RLPL Mackays for $285, and the pound's at $1.94, I'd be better off just buying a new pair of shoes instead of shipping them to EG for resoling (if and when that time comes).


    cha-ching!
     


  7. Niels

    Niels Well-Known Member

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    EG are up marked shoes however £118 seems expensive.

    I had a pair of Church's send to factory resoling (repair they called it) for 700 Danish crowns (about 93 Euro) and they did a great job with the shoes.
     


  8. Almighty1

    Almighty1 Well-Known Member

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    Speaking about NYC repair shop, what about this place that seems to be highly rated from a site that sells Women's shoes:
    http://www.bnelsonshoes.com/
     


  9. dah328

    dah328 Senior member

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    I've used B Nelson many times for minor things such as adding taps to my better shoes (EG, C&J Handgrade, etc). They've always been appropriately careful with my shoes. I've had bad experiences with Shoe Service Plus, same as well-kept above. I wouldn't have either place do a resoling, though. I like a high-quality, channeled sole too much to accept a functional but second-rate resoling job.

    dan
     


  10. hye

    hye Well-Known Member

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    ...I've had bad experiences with Shoe Service Plus, same as well-kept above.

    According to this article, Shoe Service Plus is entirely overrated:

    "Yes, Manolo sends its clients, and all those fashion girls march in with their Sergio Rossis. But Shoe Service’s reputation as a rehab unit for high-end leather far exceeds its grasp. The unsupervised, unruly line snakes out the door at lunchtime. The monosyllabic men behind the counter hustle you out after informing you that it will take five days to replace your heels. The prices are too high for basic services. And about those reputed miracles: One client recently brought in a python wallet with a tear inside the pocket, and was told by Mr. Monosyllable that nothing could be done; her local place then stitched it up neatly for all of $10. Without the attitude."

    http://nymag.com/nymetro/bony/servic...491/index.html
     


  11. dah328

    dah328 Senior member

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    That's funny. Shoe Service Plus spent years on nymag's Best Of list. They must have ruined the editor's Blahniks or something.
     


  12. Old School

    Old School Member

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    For the most part, I wear A/E shoes. Invariably I am disappointed with both heels and LEATHER soles replaced by my local cobblers. I would consider returning my shoes to A/E for repairs, but at $90.00, it makes more sense for me to just buy new A/E shoes on eBay. So, when my leather soles need replacing, I have them replaced with Vibram rubber soles and I'm always happy with that change. I've had B. Nelson place Vibram soles on a pair of A/E Chester and was quite satisfied. I've also had them replace the crepe soles on a pair of Alden Wet Weather Walkers (Norweigian toe - very nice) and I was impressed with those repairs as well. I have no reservations in recommending B. Nelson. However, I've also had my local cobbler place Vibram soles on a pair of A/E Bradley and could see no difference between B. Nelson (who charged quite a bit more) and the local cobbler. Cobblers are now more comfortable working with rubber than leather, so the relative results for rubber are higher. I have a wonderful pair of A/E Shelton just about ready for new soles and I think they're going to look great with a heavy duty Vibram Montagna sole.
     


  13. heavyd

    heavyd Senior member

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  14. fritzl

    fritzl Senior member

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    For the most part, I wear A/E shoes. Invariably I am disappointed with both heels and LEATHER soles replaced by my local cobblers. I would consider returning my shoes to A/E for repairs, but at $90.00, it makes more sense for me to just buy new A/E shoes on eBay. So, when my leather soles need replacing, I have them replaced with Vibram rubber soles and I'm always happy with that change. I've had B. Nelson place Vibram soles on a pair of A/E Chester and was quite satisfied. I've also had them replace the crepe soles on a pair of Alden Wet Weather Walkers (Norweigian toe - very nice) and I was impressed with those repairs as well. I have no reservations in recommending B. Nelson. However, I've also had my local cobbler place Vibram soles on a pair of A/E Bradley and could see no difference between B. Nelson (who charged quite a bit more) and the local cobbler. Cobblers are now more comfortable working with rubber than leather, so the relative results for rubber are higher. I have a wonderful pair of A/E Shelton just about ready for new soles and I think they're going to look great with a heavy duty Vibram Montagna sole.

    I'm sorry, but you compare apples with pears.
     


  15. chorse123

    chorse123 Senior member

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    I just had B. Nelson completely resole a pair of C&Js and they did a pretty good job. Well worth the $65. I expected it to cost more.
     


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