Dismiss Notice

STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

Repair of solid state guitar amp

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by j, Jan 12, 2007.

  1. j

    j (stands for Jerk) Admin

    Messages:
    14,914
    Likes Received:
    93
    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2002
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    I have a little Fender 30 that's been slammed around a lot (I like crashing the reverb spring [​IMG])... anyway, it doesn't work too well anymore - there's a constant hum and one of the inputs doesn't work at all. All the sites I can find are trying to sell repair services, and from what I hear it probably wouldn't be worth the money to fix the amp. I'm pretty handy with a soldering iron, so I thought I'd crack it open before giving up. Does anyone know of a site or somewhere I can get info on what I need to look for in there?
     


  2. Matt

    Matt [email protected]

    Messages:
    11,179
    Likes Received:
    114
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2005
    Location:
    Sunny Saigon
    random idea J - you could take it in to one of those repair places, see what they think.

    You may get an answer to the effect of 'sounds like your X is shot' at which point you both agree that its not worth replacing on a litle old amp like this, and you walk away knowing which part needs to be replaced.

    Then - to eBay with you...
     


  3. Stax

    Stax Senior member

    Messages:
    858
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    May 31, 2006
    Location:
    Bay Area


  4. Violinist

    Violinist Senior member

    Messages:
    1,907
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    May 12, 2006
    I have a little Fender 30 that's been slammed around a lot (I like crashing the reverb spring [​IMG])... anyway, it doesn't work too well anymore - there's a constant hum and one of the inputs doesn't work at all. All the sites I can find are trying to sell repair services, and from what I hear it probably wouldn't be worth the money to fix the amp. I'm pretty handy with a soldering iron, so I thought I'd crack it open before giving up. Does anyone know of a site or somewhere I can get info on what I need to look for in there?

    go to www.guitargeek.com

    It's like styleforum for guitars.

    If someone there doesn't know how to fix it, it can't be done.
     


  5. Get Smart

    Get Smart Don't Crink

    Messages:
    12,158
    Likes Received:
    67
    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2004
    Location:
    A town called Malice
    if it's solid state, you're probably gonna be out of luck getting it fixed. The problem is most likely in the circuit board, which would need to be replaced completely.

    I used to post quite a bit on the Harmony Central forum, which is a vast resource of geek info on guitars and amps and from my memory among threads like yours, the general consensus was any repair wasnt going to be worth the cost
     


  6. freakseam

    freakseam Senior member

    Messages:
    151
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2003
    the problem hasn't been identified, so i wouldn't presume the worst case and that whatever is the problem commands abandoning the amp. the hum might be resulting from the broken input, a loose wire solder joint. check all the obvious wires. you might want to check your guitar connections, too.
     


  7. fareau

    fareau Senior member

    Messages:
    311
    Likes Received:
    5
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2004
    I have a little Fender 30 that's been slammed around a lot (I like crashing the reverb spring [​IMG])... anyway, it doesn't work too well anymore - there's a constant hum and one of the inputs doesn't work at all. All the sites I can find are trying to sell repair services, and from what I hear it probably wouldn't be worth the money to fix the amp. I'm pretty handy with a soldering iron, so I thought I'd crack it open before giving up. Does anyone know of a site or somewhere I can get info on what I need to look for in there?
    Have you checked out www.harmony-central.com? Very cool website with all sorts of information for musicians; certainly worth a look since I think they have various fora and links pertaining to guitar/amp repairs. Edit: Woops, I see that Get Smart already mentioned the website...
     


  8. MCsommerreid

    MCsommerreid Senior member

    Messages:
    497
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    Oakland, California
    Hum on a solid state would be a loose input or other wire. From what I know of solid state audio if the circuit board had went the thing wouldnt work at all.

    IMO not really worth fixing. Solid state amps are cheap, and abundant.
     


  9. j

    j (stands for Jerk) Admin

    Messages:
    14,914
    Likes Received:
    93
    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2002
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    Well cheap is relative - I can't find another one of the same amp for less than about $100 in working condition. Messing with it a bit though, it may very well be just the input(s) or even the cable, so I'll open it up when I get a chance and take a look in there. Thanks for all the links.
     


  10. Mr. Checks

    Mr. Checks Senior member

    Messages:
    1,279
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2006
    Location:
    Here
    I would add the Fender Forum (not the company site) too; I used to post there a lot and those guys know everything about Fenders
     


  11. ComboOrgan

    ComboOrgan Senior member

    Messages:
    352
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2006
    Location:
    Ann Arbor, MI
    There are two problems I always check out myself before sending stuff to my repair guy. They're both relatively common, and can be easy to fix

    1. Check any point-to-point connections for loose solder joints.

    Cheaper new amps tend to have very little point-to-point wiring. Instead, the knobs and jacks are probably just attached to a circuit board. Still, you can look for point-to-point connections between PCBs, or to-and-from the reverb.

    2. Check for blown capacitors.

    They're the most likely single component to fail. Look for capacitors that have a bubble in their casing, or are otherwise misshapen or discolored. If the capacitors are surface-mounted (as most inexpensive electronics are), you probably don't want to attempt a repair unless you have experience with SMT.
     


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by