Recipe Thread

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Piobaire, Oct 2, 2011.

  1. mordecai

    mordecai Immoderator

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    Nice or interesting Hanukkah recipes?
     
  2. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    The wild and the pure.

    This is what I like to do as well. Basically, bone the fish through the belly so it is like a circle when pressed down flat. Marinade the fish in olive oil and saffron for 20 minutes or so, mash the liver with a little butter and tapenade. Saute the fish, then put the mash on the center of a warm plate and the fish on top. Simple is best with rouget.

    Also, there were some questions in the other thread about what kind of rouget and from where. There are a lot of different kinds deven in the Med. Three, I believe, at least without counting rouget grondin. You can tell the difference based on whether there is a stripe on the dorsal fin. I think the ones in NY all come from Senegal, which is fine, but not the best of the best. Still excellent fish. Ones imported from France are generally 2-3x as much per pound.
     
  3. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    Hm, I boned them from the top, making two cuts on either side of the dorsal fin. Next time I'll try going through the belly. Quite a lot of pin bones, but it is certainly worth the labor involved.

    Is it possible to get ones from France? I know around this time is the best for them.
     
  4. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Senior member

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    I've had whale curry rice and whale jerky before. Why, and why? :fu:
     
  5. edinatlanta

    edinatlanta Senior member

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    An ex-gf of mine's grandmother makes a really good noodle kugel. what's wrong with gefilte?
     
  6. mordecai

    mordecai Immoderator

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    These are names of food items, not recipes.
     
  7. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    Other than latkes and pastrami sandwiches, I've never had Jewish food. Is any of it good?
     
  8. mordecai

    mordecai Immoderator

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    Jewish cuisine usually resembles that of the regions it comes from, so Ashkenazis like myself were raised mostly on gross Eastern European fare (+Kung Pao Chicken), but Sephardics got great Mediterranean food. Matzo balls and kugel can be very good, but I don't think of them as especially interesting.
     
  9. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    Surprisingly, I've never had a matzo ball. I don't know what I am missing.
     
  10. philosophe

    philosophe Senior member

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    I don't know if this counts as an "interesting" Hannukah recipe, but I've been making more vegetable latkes than potato latkes in recent years. It really expands the taste and color range. Most of the root veggies work well. For something lighter, I'll do zucchini and some spinach; adding a little ricotta cheese helps the greener recipes along.

    Almost everything I cook these days is vegetable-driven, but I do occasionally get a craving for the gross Ashkenazic treats. A new bagel shop here has Katz's pastrami (attention Philadelphia chowhounds!), and I've been known to make my grandmother's brisket recipe now and then.
     
  11. philosophe

    philosophe Senior member

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    MGM, your situation is a shanda.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2011
  12. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    Oy vey, I know
     
  13. constant struggle

    constant struggle Senior member

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    Does anyone have a really good pizza recipe that I can make in a normal oven?
     
  14. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Having a Ball

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    No "good pizza" can be made in a normal oven.
     
  15. Quatsch

    Quatsch Senior member

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    Pizza - here's the best way to handle it. When I want to make dough the right way I use an adaptation of Jeff Varsano's recipe and when I'm lazy or want a quick fix, I buy dough from Trader Joe's - its good enough. You'll need a large cast iron pan. I have a large rimless cast iron griddle by Lodge, so I preheat it in the oven rather than on the stovetop. However I used to do it in a ~10" cast iron skillet. You want it really hot, but not outrageously hot. It takes some practice to figure out the line between getting a little char on the bottom and burning it. The point here is that the bottom of the crust begins to cook and has a head start on the top of the pizza, and they both end up at the finish line at about the same time.

    Move the top rack as close to the broiler as you can get while still having room for your pan. Preheat your oven as hot as you can go for at least a half hour, then throw the broiler on, and when broiler's at max temperature and your cast iron is ready, stretch the dough, carefully put it on the cast iron, top it, and slide it under the broiler. It'll cook in maybe 2-3 minutes. Its important that all the ingredients be roughly room temperature, especially the cheese. For sauce I squeeze the extra juice out of canned san marzano tomatoes and puree it with a little garlic, salt, oregano, and a touch of sugar. This brings the best results I've found short of oven-hacking. With some practice, you'll make small pies with some nice char on the bottom and top, nicely melted cheese, and decent crust texture. As long as you stay minimalistic on toppings, this should give you a reasonable approximation of a Neapolitan or central-Italian pie, depending on how you roll.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2011

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