Recent commissions (Petrocchi boots from Rome)

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by naturlaut, Nov 7, 2004.

  1. naturlaut

    naturlaut Senior member

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    Custom boots from Petrocchi Leather: burgundy grain [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] Fit: it fits my foot very well, being custom. Â It's my first time having made high-ankle boots, and I don't know if the ankle should fit this way --- right now the ankle is a bit roomy. Â Arch support is pretty good, and the toe box is comfortable. Â It sits pretty close to the contour of my foot, especially at the crease --- you can tell if it's a good custom job if it creases at the exact same place on each foot. Â I requested for full leather sock for easy 'sliding in'. Â The leather came out to be pretty tough, and I was told it will soften up quite a lot with wear, so I am trying to break them in right now. Â I have a large bone at the foot of my pinky toe, and the last has compensated that with a bit room there. Â They are certainly not light, but not as heavy as other English boots I have either. Â It looks long, but when I compare measurements with my other shoes (from Lobb or Green) they are actually about 1/4" shorter. Â Fortunately I requested a squarish-toe, otherwise they would look even longer with a pointy-toe. Â I can't remember exactly how much they were, but they were definitely less than 1000 Eur. Â The shop keeper/measurer is a very lady, and my first order was accompanied by a string of leather samples and a thank you letter. Â I will definitely order from Petrocchi again. Rating: **** Value: *****
     
  2. jcusey

    jcusey Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I always like a good chukka boot, and these are very attractive. I think that a loose fit at the ankle is imperative -- since they hit right at the ankle, they would dig into your leg evey time you moved your foot if they weren't.

    How did you find Petrocchi and what do you know about them? Euro 1000 seems like a reasonable price for a good-quality machine-made bespoke shoe (and the fact that these are Blake-stitched indicates that they're machine-made).
     
  3. naturlaut

    naturlaut Senior member

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    Just wore it again today (at home) and it is starting to feel more comfortable. Â I am definitely enjoying them --- and I'm planning to pick up a burgundy belt to go with the shoe. Petrocchi is actually a pretty famous shop in Rome, although they maintain a very low profile. Â Their production is kind of like Green: a combination of human-guided machine work (not mass-production machine work) and some real hand work, especially on the Norvegese models. Â There is no discount for subsequent pairs, even though your wooden last is already made. Â You can buy the shoes they have on display, although they are not really sized in our common sizing system. Â Here are some more pictures from the shop. [​IMG] [​IMG] I will be posting my Bonora later. Naturlaut
     
  4. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I'm not sure that they are machine Blake stitched. They look welted to me, but in a hybrid fashion. Normally a welted shoe has a feather cut, which avoids any stitches showing on the insoles. The different length of the stitches (shorter in the curves, longer in the straights) indicates hand stitching to me. I believe that the welt was not stitched onto a feather, be it cut or glued, but was stitched right through the insole with a row of hand stitching.

    I have seen occasionally (on the Japanese sites) pictures of Italian bespoke shoes with a row of stitching on the insoles. Maybe there is a tradition of constructing shoes that way, rather like Blake-Rapid with an additional row of stitching (either hand or machine made) holding the outer sole in place. Just a guess.
     
  5. brescd01

    brescd01 Senior member

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    Again, I really enjoy and appreciate this critical evaluation of acquisitions. The shoe is beautiful, really lovely. I once said that I had only one Alfred Sargent model to recommend (the full brogue), but actually their chukka is also quite nice, mine is the Quorn, which is black with Dainite sole. It is also available with a leather sole. Of course, it is much less expensive, 205 dollars delivered.
     
  6. T4phage

    T4phage Senior member

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    Again, nice shoe Naturlaut.  Did you design the shoe or choose from a selection of their models?

    Is Petrocchi the bespoke maker on the via del Corso, near where it crosses Condotti?

    brescd01, yes the AS is considerably cheaper, but then again, it is not bespoke...... You do not have the choice options as in bespoke, nor will the fit be anywhere as good (of course the lastmaker must be competent.)
     
  7. jcusey

    jcusey Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    (jcusey @ 06 Nov. 2004, 10:37) a good-quality machine-made bespoke shoe (and the fact that these are Blake-stitched indicates that they're machine-made).
    I'm not sure that they are machine Blake stitched. They look welted to me, but in a hybrid fashion. Normally a welted shoe has a feather cut, which avoids any stitches showing on the insoles. The different length of the stitches (shorter in the curves, longer in the straights) indicates hand stitching to me. I believe that the welt was not stitched onto a feather, be it cut or glued, but was stitched right through the insole with a row of hand stitching.
    I'm perfectly willing to bow to your expertise, but I don't see how a human hand could get the stitches on the inside of the shoe like that. You can seel the welt strip on the side shot of the sole, but that's not definitive -- you can have a welt without the shoe being welted.
     
  8. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    jcusey - You're probably right; I didn't think it through. I was thinking of stitching on the welt while the insole is still unattached and flat, resting on the bench. But that's not possible as the uppers need to be pulled over the insole and then the welt holds them in place.

    As you said, one would have to go with the needle inside the shoe to stitch on the welt and that can't be done. Oh well, some thoughts were running away with me.
     
  9. shqiptar

    shqiptar Well-Known Member

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    This too, is a very thoughtfull purchase. I like the shape of the shoe and the fact it's moderately square. This detail helps the timelessness of the design. The pointed design makes a shoe a bit too long (sometimes like a canoe), and throws the overall look of the man out of proportion. This shape makes for an overall more harmonious outfit.

    Whether with a suit, jeans, khakis/chinos, or thick tweed winter slacks, the shoes provide all the style the gentleman needs. For a cold sunny autumn/winter day they are perfect.

    Enjoy them.
     
  10. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    I agree completely. As a matter of fact, I have a pair of black Prada laceups with nearly an identical toebox, in a very similar looking material. In fact, except for the fact that my shoes are oxfords (a variation on the traditional blucher) there appear to be hardly any differences in the design at all. Great shoe. Love it. I'm sure you'll love those too. A great, classic and stylish design.
     
  11. naturlaut

    naturlaut Senior member

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    Mr. T4phage: It was modified from one of their models on display. I was specifically looking for an ankle (chukka) boot and I have been looking around for an elegant toe box --- I don't want them to look like construction-workers' boots or something straight out from a Gucci runway. Petrocchi is in a rather hidden side street (via dell Orso 25) close to the river on the right bank. There is a shop a few steps away that specializes in mosaic, it was another interesting visit there.


    To Mr. Bengal-Stripes: I have seen a good-year machine before, it's a very complicated piece of equipment and it really requires expert handling. I wonder what a blake-stitch machine is like. Any ideas?

    I understand the value in handstitching. However, knowing that some of these machines are equally difficult to handle, I have no less appreciation for these artisans.
     
  12. T4phage

    T4phage Senior member

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    Originally posted by Naturlaut:
    [​IMG] I thought we were on a first name basis here [​IMG] Anyway, I now remember... It's near Piazza Navona right? I've been to the store about 2 years ago. Oh, if you are at Navona, drop by at Rance (end of the piazza towards the river), they have excellent soaps.
     
  13. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I tried to find on google a picture of a Blake machine, but I had no luck. All the machinery in factory shoe production are pretty big monsters and they are all ancient (at least 50 if not 100 years old). Here is an article on the impact of machines on shoe production in Norwich (I believe the entire industry in Norwich has gone). http://www.museums.norfolk.gov.uk/de...t=400.740.50x1
     
  14. MPS

    MPS Senior member

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    They're possibly the nicest Chukka's I've seen.

    Speaking of Rome, I saw a tiny shoemakers on a small street leading up to the Quirinale when I visited in July. I didn't note the name. Does this place sound familiar to anyone?
     

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