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Reasons why New York Sucks

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Manton, Aug 26, 2012.

  1. sugarbutch

    sugarbutch Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    But it's the transit union which is bringing down the city... :sarcasm:
     
  2. aravenel

    aravenel Senior member

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    Exactly--if I was going to pay that kind of money, I wanted to at least feel like the guy had done some service for me. It was far too much money for the service provided, but at least he provided a service.

    The ones where you find the listing are the absolute worst. A few years back, I found a place on Craigslist and went to look at it. Didn't like it, but asked the broker if he had any similar. He shrugged his shoulders. The next day, I found another place and went to check it out and it was the same exact broker. I didn't rent the place just because I refused to write a check to a broker that lazy and worthless.

    Another time, I was all ready to sign a lease, had cashier's checks for brokers fee and everything in hand, and the broker was an hour late showing up to the lease signing (at least, that's how long I waited before leaving). Eventually, I found an open house near there and just left--ended up taking that apartment. Ugh, brokers.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2013
  3. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

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    is it at all possible to find a place on like street easy then use the powers of the internet to find the landlord and just contact them directly?
     
  4. aravenel

    aravenel Senior member

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    I've always heard of people trying that, but I'd guess most landlords use a broker because they don't want to deal with it, so it's probably a crapshoot.
     
  5. NORE

    NORE Senior member

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    Yes, that's what I did. The problem is many of them get poached by brokers who run the same searches as you would and then contact the broker and start showing the apartment. This is why many ads state, "No Brokers, please"
     
  6. GreenFrog

    GreenFrog Senior member

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    When's the best time to find a good deal for an APT in NYC? Apr - May? Oct - Nov?

    I'm sure like any other major city, there are seasonal fluctuations in supply and demand, and therefore, price. Or is NYC in a league of its own where Shit Is Just Always Expensive?
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2013
  7. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

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    I've heard that months that aren't May, June, July (influx of new graduates) can be slightly cheaper, but only slightly. I haven't ever noticed this, I've only noticed the relative lack of availability when comparing options in December vs. June.


    And there basically aren't deals for those coming to live in the city for the first time.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2013
  8. aravenel

    aravenel Senior member

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    This. Most apartments come on the market in May, June, July. They can be a bit more expensive, but there is a lot more selection.

    Also realize that the apartment market is very fast moving here. Most places aren't listed on the market until 4-6 weeks out from the start of the lease, so you can't really start looking now for a place for this summer. Gotta wait a few more months.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2013
  9. GreenFrog

    GreenFrog Senior member

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    Oh, wow. Okay, thanks guys.

    Just trying to figure out how to time my job search process and how to juggle that with my newly-extended lease in Dallas that ends in August. Was thinking about making moves now with the goal of moving to NYC by May / June, but I might just stick it out a couple more months and try to move by September.
     
  10. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

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    selling your car should cover the costs to sign
     
  11. GreenFrog

    GreenFrog Senior member

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    At first I laughed.

    Then I serious'd.

    And then I frowned.
     
  12. aravenel

    aravenel Senior member

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    The other good thing about the May/June/July stock is that it's where a lot of the cheaper apartments are in my experience, given that it is so oriented towards college grads.

    I will say that finding an apartment is far and away the worst part about moving to the city. Prepare yourself for despair and wondering what you have gotten yourself into. However, if you can get through it, everything else will be (relatively) smooth sailing.
     
  13. aravenel

    aravenel Senior member

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    Yeah, no, he's serious.
     
  14. poorsod

    poorsod Senior member

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  15. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

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    the more I think about it, I realize that my broker fee has actually saved me money. Ads may say "no fee" but that's rarely the case since they just build it into the rent. My current place was "no fee", but of course our broker wasn't working for free, so I offered to pay it and the landlord reduced the rent by the equivalent fee amount over one year. So the first year was a wash. The next year, I was still paying the reduced rent, and I still am (granted, it has gone up every year since). I think this may be the first year where the rent I pay matches the original price from 4 or 5 years ago.
     
  16. aravenel

    aravenel Senior member

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    Well, I wouldn't say it saves money (mostly because the whole thing is absurd to begin with, and most people don't stay in places long enough for it to break even), but I agree that most non-fee places are more expensive to cover it. Also, the stock of non-fee places tends to be worse. Occasionally you'll find a nice place in an owner-occupied brownstone or whatever, but that's the exception.

    The thing that really kills me about having to pay a broker's fee this summer is that this will likely be our last year in New York, and so amortizing that fee out over one year is a serious increase in the real cost of the apartment.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2013
  17. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

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    yeah, it sucks to pay it, but I've def. saved money with the lower rent over the course of a few years.




    when I said "no deals for newbs", it's because the types of places like this are usually sapped up by NYers first since putting them on Craigslist or something tends to be a last-case scenario for the owner. It's word of mouth at first. We were very close to moving to Bleecker and Sullivan this way.
     
  18. aravenel

    aravenel Senior member

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    Definitely, those types of places are gone in a second, and usually through word of mouth. Which makes sense--if someone is living in your house, you kinda want to have some sort of reference from someone you know.

    Thought it's not all rainbows and unicorns. We lived in an owner-occupied brownstone in Park Slope for a while, and the owner turned out to be crazy, and to have children who were the spawn of Satan. We were very happy to leave.
     
  19. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

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    we also looked at a place in Brooklyn that was owned by one of my wife's co-workers. They did a full gut and redesign on it, and it turned out f'ing beautiful. Two-one bedroom units on floors 2 and 3, and then the ground floor + lower level was another giant unit with something like 4 bedrooms. The apartments themselves were wonderful, but I was a little meh on the area. This was just over 3 years ago, and they were starting to build that stadium nearby (yep, Barclays).

    Now they're getting $3,500/month for those one bedroom units.
     
  20. aravenel

    aravenel Senior member

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    Whoa, that is a good sum for a 1BR in that area. Must have really done a good job on the reno.
     

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